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Author Topic: Factory weathering  (Read 8133 times)

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Offline Karhedron

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Factory weathering
« on: October 23, 2012, 01:48:18 PM »
This musing was prompted by the recent announcements at the Dapol open day that their class 22s would be available with factory weathering based on work of Mercig.

http://www.mercigstudios.com/news

This follows on previous offerings from Dapol such as their weathered 9F and silver bullets (or should that be "muddy bullets").

This kind of finish is a huge step up the factory weathering of just 2-3 years ago where a spray of grey-brown around the frames was considered sufficient. Now we are getting different shades and textures as well as details such as streaking and even limescale deposits.

Farish are upping their game too. The reecent WD had a couple of different shades of weathering applied quite finely (although for my money they are not as good as the latest Dapol weathering).

With ever increasing numbers of classes available RTR in N gauge, weathering is the new frontier. This (along with renumbering) was the classic first step on the road to improving out-of-the-box models. Now that weathering to Mercig standards is available RTR for just a few extra pounds, where does that leave the hobby?

Now granted some people like their locos ex-works and there is nothing wrong with that (remember rule #1  :NGaugersRule: ). Others will still enjoy the challenge of doing something themselves. But with factory weathering this good, it does mean it will take even more courage for people to take their brushes to pristine models.

On the other hand, will it act as encouragement? Will such good factory weathering provide modellers with a good template to follow with their own initial efforts? Will seeing how good well-weathered models look on a layout encourage people to try out on some of their own models?

I don't know the answers but I am interested to hear other people's thoughts on these very positive developments.
Well, that's just not good enough. Some fount of all knowledge you are!  :no:  ;)

Offline trainsdownunder

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2012, 02:44:19 PM »
A step in the right direction I would certainly agree for some of the less brave modellers. Locos with weathering will make all the difference, but will it be followed by weathered wagons to avoid the 'dirty' loco with sparkly clean wagons, and will those wagons then have to come in different guises for the differing loads around - clay, coal, ore, etc.

It could add a whole set of profit product lines or maybe lead to a mass explosion in the sale of airbrushes and related goodies.

However, won't it look a bit odd if all your diesels have the same dirty mark in the same place  :hmmm:

Offline Karhedron

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2012, 02:54:55 PM »
However, won't it look a bit odd if all your diesels have the same dirty mark in the same place  :hmmm:
Not necessarily as long as those dirty marks are in obvious places like around the exhaust.  ;)
Well, that's just not good enough. Some fount of all knowledge you are!  :no:  ;)

Offline Matthew-peter

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2012, 03:46:07 PM »
The problem I have is renumbering, If I want to get, for example with Delfryn i want 2 - 3 Regi rail 101's in which case Ill need to renumber two out of the box which after I will need to weather them.
However if I like a weathered version I will normally be stuck to getting just the one because i wouldnt be able to renumber it and get the same standard of finish of that which it already had applied, so for me unless they start bringing regular different running numbers out, which so far they dont seem to do, Id better stick with unweathered mainly. On another note though, I do have to admit that it would give me the right push to start weathering more and who knows, eventually I may be able to renumber weathered versions.

This is not to say they are not good looking, I do think they look fantastic and i would happily buy one for the layout and stick to renumbering non weathered versions.


Hope all the above makes sense  :laughabovepost:
OK who took my cake?

Offline 4x2

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2012, 04:49:01 PM »
Factory weathering has got better, the farish B1 was done rather well in my opinion. Diesels do seem to be harder to weather convincingly - too many large flat areas and faded paint work for example. I think it's better to do it yourself, i practiced on a couple of del prados (they do have a use) until i felt i'd got it about right or get a mate to do it for you !

This Atlas SD35 belongs to me, but my good friend Elvinley did the weathering - rather well me thinks !
If it's got rails... you have my full, undivided attention - Steam, diesel and electric, 'tis all good !

Mike

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2012, 05:39:47 PM »
Sorry for repeating myself, but as a cack-handed old numpty I will ALWAYS buy factory weathered versions of what I'm after, despite having seen some inspirational weathering by other members of the forum. Not being a fan of pristine, and not really having the time to attempt weathering as I have too much other stuff to do, it suits me there is a proliferation of weathered models - including wagons.



Maybe, just maybe, when I have the track laid & ballasted, scenery done, buildings built, electrickery er wired etc, I will turn my attention to having a stab at it when there's nothing else to do but detail things. Sad to say that's going to be a long ways off :-[

Offline tim-pelican

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #6 on: October 23, 2012, 05:49:26 PM »
Weathering is probably first on the list of things I'd be willing to try in terms of altering a model from the factory, but it's nice to have the option of buying them like that too - both to pander to my laziness / cack-handedness, and as an example if I do decide to have a try.


Offline Tank

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #7 on: October 23, 2012, 06:59:14 PM »
You see, this is why I chose Network SouthEast, as their trains were ALWAYS spotless. :angel: :smiley-laughing:

Offline Pengi

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #8 on: October 23, 2012, 07:47:01 PM »
There is an article about NSE in Modern Rail and it shows their quality improvements from 1986 (when NSE started) to 1987. In 1986 the daily exterior wash was 21% compared with 94% in 1987 and the monthly heavy interior clean went up from 53% of target to 96% of target. As Tank says, they were pretty much spotless.

I recall Bachmann bringing out two versions of its OO Southern Turbostar (I had both) - one pristine and one weathered. The weathered version attracted criticism on the grounds that the trains rarely look grubby.
Just one Pendolino, give it to me, a beautiful train, from Italy

Offline bluedepot

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #9 on: October 23, 2012, 08:22:53 PM »
i think it's good if they produce both weathered and pristine versions of locos  (and dcc fitted, dcc sound)

some people, myself included, are not brave enough to weather a loco yet or just don't have the skills. i have weathered a few cheap wagons because it doesn't matter if they go wrong. to weather a new loco is too risky though.


tim

Offline trainsdownunder

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #10 on: October 23, 2012, 11:59:29 PM »
Quote
I think it's better to do it yourself, i practiced on a couple of del prados (they do have a use)

So there is a purpose for these after all  :D :D

Offline Elvinley

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #11 on: October 24, 2012, 12:15:40 AM »
Factory weathering often looks nice, but a bit too nice. Real weathering is pretty unsightly at times.

Offline Matthew-peter

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #12 on: October 24, 2012, 12:20:24 AM »
Factory weathering often looks nice, but a bit too nice. Real weathering is pretty unsightly at times.

I have to admit, sonetime ago I saw a photo if a class 60 that had blown an engine or something and all around the grill was pure black, will try find it in the morning. I guess what I was trying to say was I agree about real weathering can look pretty unsightly haha.
OK who took my cake?

Offline Elvinley

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #13 on: October 24, 2012, 12:23:07 AM »
Definitley. I have seen photos of locos and real life examples that you wouldn't particularly want going round your layout, and if you did copy them someone would be bound to think you had done a bad job  :confused1:

Offline Elvinley

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #14 on: October 24, 2012, 12:24:08 AM »
Sorry for repeating myself, but as a cack-handed old numpty I will ALWAYS buy factory weathered versions of what I'm after, despite having seen some inspirational weathering by other members of the forum. Not being a fan of pristine, and not really having the time to attempt weathering as I have too much other stuff to do, it suits me there is a proliferation of weathered models - including wagons.



Maybe, just maybe, when I have the track laid & ballasted, scenery done, buildings built, electrickery er wired etc, I will turn my attention to having a stab at it when there's nothing else to do but detail things. Sad to say that's going to be a long ways off :-[


If only they could be bothered to move the loco so the weathering doesn't leave a stencil impriint of the con rods!

 

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