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Author Topic: Factory weathering  (Read 8134 times)

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Offline paulprice

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #45 on: July 19, 2015, 08:31:48 AM »
I must admit its a strange subject, I kind of like weathering on my stock, as it brings a bit of realism to the models, and it can hide a multitude of sins.

Really its not that difficult to do either, even without an airbrush, though I must admit I find it difficult to apply to some of my crimson Locomotives, but up to know only a couple have escaped :)

Its like everything though, our hobby has many different views and I think that is good, and people like many different things within it, I have even heard rumours that there are things called SR fans???


Offline PLD

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #46 on: July 19, 2015, 08:32:51 AM »
Happy (as ever) to be proved wrong, it's just that the pristine Reginal 158 is not listed at all in future releases.
Not a 'Future Release' but a past release! It is a perfect example of what I described - the Clean version came first, and perhaps you have unfortunately missed it...

Catalog no #8707. First released circa 1998 (Poole manufactured) plus at least two Chinese made re-runs the last c 2011.
You should feel sorry for those wanting a weathered version who have had to wait almost 20 years after the original clean release!!  ;)

Online njee20

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #47 on: July 19, 2015, 08:53:38 AM »
The Farish Colas HHA? Only available weathered, which is a shame because it get the 'all over brown' treatment, which isn't how the prototypes look when dirty.

I get your point PLD, but a 5+ year old model is far enough back for it to be a very valid criticism I'd say. Technically yes a pristine one was available, but practically no.

Offline Skyline2uk

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #48 on: July 19, 2015, 09:09:53 AM »
I am aware of the Poole version (dummy and powered) but I am also aware and very much looking forward to the new tooling version, hopefully improving the mechanism which was a bit prone to failure (my NSE version has been to BR Bob twice over the years).

Skyline2uk

Offline johnlambert

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #49 on: July 19, 2015, 09:54:18 AM »
I can understand the frustration some people feel when the only available version of a loco, multiple unit or a piece of rolling stock is factory weathered and they want a pristine version.  Last year I think the only maroon liveried BR Mk1 coaches in the catalogue were factory weathered (although I see pristine versions are now listed), which must be frustrating if you need a clean example.  Funny how you never hear people complain when weathered versions are not available.

My main gripe with the weathered maroon Mk1s was the lack of consistency in the level of weathering and the choice of running number.  Two (or is it three?) of the weathered Mk1s have weathering all the way up the sides of the coach while the latest coach (a BCK) had weathering just on the underframe.  Bachmann also chose to use different regional prefixes on the weathered coaches; although apparently it was common to see trains made up from coaches from all over the network (and you can't really see the running number unless you're very close to the coach).

Some models need weathering to look their best - the Dapol Siphons and Fruit Ds look a bit shiny in their factory, un-weathered finish.  The weathered Siphon looks much more pleasing (apart from the couplings but that's a different discussion) and I've given my Fruit D wagons a light dusting of matt brown to take away the 'plastic' appearance that they have out of the box.  I do worry a little about destroying the value of my stock, and then I tell myself that I'm supposed to be a modeller not a collector.

As for weathered locos; I have the weathered Graham Farish Fairburn 2-6-4 tank, which I chose because I found the appearance more pleasing than the non-weathered examples.  It isn't the best example of weathering - just a dusting of grey/brown - but I liked it.

It is great to have the choice of pristine or weathered models. 

Offline davidinyork

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #50 on: July 19, 2015, 10:34:29 AM »
Happy (as ever) to be proved wrong, it's just that the pristine Reginal 158 is not listed at all in future releases.
Not a 'Future Release' but a past release! It is a perfect example of what I described - the Clean version came first, and perhaps you have unfortunately missed it...

Catalog no #8707. First released circa 1998 (Poole manufactured) plus at least two Chinese made re-runs the last c 2011.
You should feel sorry for those wanting a weathered version who have had to wait almost 20 years after the original clean release!!  ;)

I think the point is that you are unlikely to find anywhere with stocks of something from 3 years ago (unless it's a poor seller), and with popular liveries they don't come up on ebay very often (and sell for a lot when they do). With Dapol the problem doesn't arise as they do weathered and unweathered versions in the same livery at around the same time, which works for everyone.

As for feeling sorry for those wanting a weathered version of something, it's much easier to add weathering to a model that it is to remove it...

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #51 on: July 19, 2015, 10:35:09 AM »
Last year I think the only maroon liveried BR Mk1 coaches in the catalogue were factory weathered (although I see pristine versions are now listed), which must be frustrating if you need a clean example.  Funny how you never hear people complain when weathered versions are not available.


Just for you, John, I'll whinge about non-availability of a weathered maroon Mk1 and that's the item 374-187C (showing on their website as Nov/Dec) which I've been awaiting for ages. ;)
I find the biggest issue is not being able to make a full rake due to the manufacturers not releasing the required items at the same time, but this is true regardless of weathered/pristine and I'm drifting off topic, aren't I.
Nurse....NURSE!

Online Bealman

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #52 on: July 19, 2015, 10:57:50 AM »
As a teenager, I distinctly remember seeing a clean maroon mk1 in a rake of "weathered" coaches behind a very dirty two tone green 47 at Darlington,  so there's a prototype for everything!
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 10:59:39 AM by Bealman »
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline johnlambert

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #53 on: July 19, 2015, 11:09:52 AM »
Funny how you never hear people complain when weathered versions are not available.


Just for you, John, I'll whinge about non-availability of a weathered maroon Mk1 and that's the item 374-187C (showing on their website as Nov/Dec) which I've been awaiting for ages. ;)
I find the biggest issue is not being able to make a full rake due to the manufacturers not releasing the required items at the same time, but this is true regardless of weathered/pristine and I'm drifting off topic, aren't I.
Nurse....NURSE!

Thanks, Nobby.

I can see your point about buying a complete train in one go.  I am waiting for 374-187C too and 374-130B (which I need for my parcels train).  While it is nice to spread the cost over several months it does leave you with the nagging doubt that the one coach you need will have sold out before you can buy it.

Offline johnlambert

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #54 on: July 19, 2015, 11:15:43 AM »
As a teenager, I distinctly remember seeing a clean maroon mk1 in a rake of "weathered" coaches behind a very dirty two tone green 47 at Darlington,  so there's a prototype for everything!

I think that's something I sometimes forget; in the 'good old days' train formations were much more flexible, so there's no reason to expect that an entire train will be uniformly weathered.  So it doesn't matter (not that it ever really matters) if you run a train that mixes weathered and unweathered stock. 

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #55 on: July 19, 2015, 11:32:01 AM »
Funny how you never hear people complain when weathered versions are not available.


Just for you, John, I'll whinge about non-availability of a weathered maroon Mk1 and that's the item 374-187C (showing on their website as Nov/Dec) which I've been awaiting for ages. ;)
I find the biggest issue is not being able to make a full rake due to the manufacturers not releasing the required items at the same time, but this is true regardless of weathered/pristine and I'm drifting off topic, aren't I.
Nurse....NURSE!

Thanks, Nobby.

I can see your point about buying a complete train in one go.  I am waiting for 374-187C too and 374-130B (which I need for my parcels train).  While it is nice to spread the cost over several months it does leave you with the nagging doubt that the one coach you need will have sold out before you can buy it.

Oh, you scoundrel, John. I hadn't seen that 374-130B so will now have to spend more dosh :doh:
(I have a couple of the pristine ones)

Offline Karhedron

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #56 on: July 19, 2015, 09:36:51 PM »
My view is that for weathering to work the locos and stock need to be done consistently, and a factory-weathered loco isn't really going to achieve this unless a whole set of stock is also available to go with it, weathered in the same style (which isn't normally the case).

Not necessarily true. Particularly towards the end of steam, coaches were clean regularly (on the sides at least) which the steamers hauling them were allowed to get into a filthy state.

I tend to buy pristine but i have a few weathered items, particularly the Dapol stuff, as some of it is much better than I could do myself. I agree that weathering is a skill that can be learnt but it would require investing in an airbrush and a lot of practice. With a young family, time and money are not as plentiful as I would like so I am happy to buy a few weathered items if it is done well (as the more recent Dapol stuff tends to be).

If someone wants to practice, working on photos of the real thing is the only way to go. Mind you, you could always try this class 66. Even an all-over coat with a rattle can of grime might not be heavy enough.  :smiley-laughing:

Well, that's just not good enough. Some fount of all knowledge you are!  :no:  ;)

Offline NeMo

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #57 on: July 19, 2015, 10:08:28 PM »
I agree that weathering is a skill that can be learnt but it would require investing in an airbrush and a lot of practice. With a young family, time and money are not as plentiful as I would like so I am happy to buy a few weathered items if it is done well (as the more recent Dapol stuff tends to be).
I think this is an important point. Many people don't weather their rolling stock because they're afraid they're going to mess things up, either in terms of appearance or by gumming up the mechanisms inside the model somehow.

Yes, you do need an airbrush, but a cheap (60) Chinese compressor and airbrush will do the trick nicely. But once you've got that, then you can practise on cheap stuff first, a short wheelbase wagon for example. You're unlikely to 'ruin' a 12t van, as these were pretty diverse in reality, and often covered in all sorts of grime. If you do make a mistake, white spirit or IPA will remove enamel paint while leaving the original paintwork more or less intact (sometimes a bit of the matt varnish is lost, but that's easily replaced). I'm not saying weathering is risk-free, but it's easily undone, and if we're talking about a cheap Peco wagon bought secondhand, what have you got to lose? Many of their older models are improved immeasurably by having some of that plasticky look airbrushed away.

Weathering is also a fun pastime in itself and one of the bits of the hobby I've found myself getting better at relatively quickly. I'd recommend anyone give it a go! I've recently been trying out paint-fading techniques, and while it took a bit of experimentation, done right it's very effective. Since factory weathered diesels are usually weathered with darker shades, my faded models of the same diesels add variety to my collection.

Personally, I think weathering is essential unless you're buying your models as collectables with possible resale down the line (a perfectly logical and understandable approach).

Cheers, NeMo
NGS Journal Editor

Offline woodbury22uk

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #58 on: July 19, 2015, 10:13:20 PM »



Have you got the full running number for that one please Matt?
Mike

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Offline Sprintex

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Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #59 on: July 19, 2015, 10:16:29 PM »
Looks like 66223 to me through the dirt :thumbsup:

On the subject of have-a-go weathering I've done a few wagons now and am quite happy with them, fairly easy with general grime and dirt just giving a little consideration to where dirt would accumulate depending on the shape of the wagon. I'll probably move on to my coaching stock as well but I doubt I'd do a loco though as it's much more specific and needs proper airbrushing as has already been said ;)


Paul
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 10:21:47 PM by Sprintex »

 

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