!!

Not Registered?

Welcome!  Please register to view all of the new posts and forum boards - some of which are hidden to guests.  After registering and gaining 10 posts you will be able to sell and buy items on our N'porium.

If you have any problems registering, then please check your spam filter before emailing us.  Hotmail users seem to find their emails in the Junk folder.


Thanks for reading,
The NGF Staff.

Author Topic: Factory weathering  (Read 8132 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline EtchedPixels

  • Advertiser
  • Trade Count: (+44)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 16353
  • 2mm Association Number: 4412
  • Posts: 8382
  • Country: wales
  • Gender: Male
    • Ebay
    • Google+
    • Twitter
    • YouTube
    • Etched Pixels
    • Awards
Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #15 on: October 24, 2012, 12:50:23 AM »
Factory weathering often looks nice, but a bit too nice. Real weathering is pretty unsightly at times.


I have to admit, sonetime ago I saw a photo if a class 60 that had blown an engine or something and all around the grill was pure black, will try find it in the morning. I guess what I was trying to say was I agree about real weathering can look pretty unsightly haha.


Probably 60081 - it suffered a terminal engine failure and threw a piston

You might also need to remodel the body slightly on such a loco.

http://daves-trains.smugmug.com/Trains/Type-5-Power/16463052_bHwnKQ/1236315396_axE95#!i=1236315396&k=PdG5P4P
"Knowledge has no value or use for the solitary owner: to be enjoyed it must be communicated" -- Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden

Offline Newportnobby

  • Global Moderator
  • Trade Count: (+98)
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 21962
  • Posts: 33762
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #16 on: October 24, 2012, 08:02:18 AM »


If only they could be bothered to move the loco so the weathering doesn't leave a stencil impriint of the con rods!

Nice spot, Ian! I confess I hadn't even noticed that :doh:

Offline Matthew-peter

  • Trade Count: (+2)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23667
  • Posts: 561
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #17 on: October 24, 2012, 01:18:33 PM »
Factory weathering often looks nice, but a bit too nice. Real weathering is pretty unsightly at times.


I have to admit, sonetime ago I saw a photo if a class 60 that had blown an engine or something and all around the grill was pure black, will try find it in the morning. I guess what I was trying to say was I agree about real weathering can look pretty unsightly haha.


Probably 60081 - it suffered a terminal engine failure and threw a piston

You might also need to remodel the body slightly on such a loco.

http://daves-trains.smugmug.com/Trains/Type-5-Power/16463052_bHwnKQ/1236315396_axE95#!i=1236315396&k=PdG5P4P


It wasnt that one, although a good photo, although if someone gave me a model weathered like that I would ask to see a photo they had worked from haha

I wonder if this is considered too much..... http://www.scot-rail.co.uk/photo/scaled/12894/
« Last Edit: October 24, 2012, 02:15:41 PM by Matthew-peter »
OK who took my cake?

Offline Elvinley

  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1125
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • YouTube
    • Elvinley YouTube
    • Awards
Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #18 on: October 25, 2012, 12:45:05 PM »
When I did the sandite trains with DBS the locos got in this state regularly.

Offline Elvinley

  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1125
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • YouTube
    • Elvinley YouTube
    • Awards
Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #19 on: October 25, 2012, 12:48:35 PM »


If only they could be bothered to move the loco so the weathering doesn't leave a stencil impriint of the con rods!

Nice spot, Ian! I confess I hadn't even noticed that :doh:

On my weathered class 14 there is a similar thing with the section of the con rods hidden under the steps but strangely the wheels seem to have complete weathering.

Offline Newportnobby

  • Global Moderator
  • Trade Count: (+98)
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 21962
  • Posts: 33762
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #20 on: October 25, 2012, 12:53:53 PM »


If only they could be bothered to move the loco so the weathering doesn't leave a stencil impriint of the con rods!

Nice spot, Ian! I confess I hadn't even noticed that :doh:

On my weathered class 14 there is a similar thing with the section of the con rods hidden under the steps but strangely the wheels seem to have complete weathering.

Oh Gawd - I'll check mine too :doh:

Online davidinyork

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 887
  • Country: gb
    • Awards
Factory weathering
« Reply #21 on: July 17, 2015, 09:04:21 PM »
What do people think of Bachmann's practice of releasing models with factory weathering? This seems to be something they are doing with increasing number of locos in both gauges recently.

I buy mostly N, plus the occasional OO gauge loco if it's something I'm particularly interested in. There are a number of recent / current / forthcoming Bachmann/Farish models which I would have bought but won't because they are weathered - I simply don't like them weathered and given the cost of the locos it isn't worth the risk of trying to clean it off and risking damaging the paintwork.

My view is that for weathering to work the locos and stock need to be done consistently, and a factory-weathered loco isn't really going to achieve this unless a whole set of stock is also available to go with it, weathered in the same style (which isn't normally the case). If someone is serious enough about their layout to want the stock and locos weathered, they are likely to be able to do it themselves, and in most cases do a better job than the factory weathering.

Dapol don't (so far as I know) supply anything weathered, and Hornby only do it occasionally.

What do others think - are Bachmann doing it too much of late? I guess they must have done research on what people want, but I imagine I'm not the only one who won't buy the models as a result.

Offline Newportnobby

  • Global Moderator
  • Trade Count: (+98)
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 21962
  • Posts: 33762
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #22 on: July 17, 2015, 09:11:32 PM »
Many folks don't like the factory weathering for all the reasons you have given, but for cack-handed people like me it will do. Luckily, if I want some proper weathering then a fellow forum member (mk1gtstu) does commissions and makes a fantastic job of it.
BTW - Dapol do weathered locos. The 9F, Western, Hymek and class 22 spring to mind immediately.
The Western and the class 22 are very, very good.

Online Rabbitaway

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 637
  • Country: gb
    • Awards
Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #23 on: July 17, 2015, 09:14:32 PM »
I would always buy the non weathered versions if I can

I do dislike factory weathering

 :thumbsdown:

Offline NeMo

  • Trade Count: (+3)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23720
  • Posts: 2649
  • Country: gb
    • Awards
Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #24 on: July 17, 2015, 09:19:04 PM »
I like factory weathering if it's done well.

On the plus side, such models don't need additional weathering on the part of the owner, and that means you can run realistic-looking trains without reducing the resale value of your collectable model. It'd also useful for those modellers who want weathered stock but aren't comfortable weathering models or don't own the tools to do so.

On the debit side though it's true that not everyone likes weathered stock. Low quality weathering doesn't really add much to the realism of a model locomotive either (the weathered 'Hymek' from Dapol that was included with their milk tanker book set is one such example, and received little more than an all-over spray of grey-brown).

At the end of the day, weathered locomotives are an option. Comparing the two brands, I think Dapol seems to get the nod when it comes to weathering, their recent 'Western' and Class 22 diesels, plus the slightly older 9Fs and 'Silver Bullet' tankers are really superb examples of off-the-shelf weathering. For sure Mercig Studios would do even better jobs with these, but at something like 50 times the expense! Some Dapol weathering is pretty lame though (the 'Hymek' springs to mind, but the weathering on their cheaper wagons is a bit crude too). Bachmann seems to be somewhere in between: never clumsy, but as yet, nothing particularly exceptional either.

Cheers, NeMo
NGS Journal Editor

Offline austinbob

  • Trade Count: (+3)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23835
  • Posts: 4441
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #25 on: July 17, 2015, 09:22:01 PM »
To my eyes the factory weathering I have on three diesels and a number of wagons looks pretty good to me. I'm sure if it were hand done it could look better, but these items are so small I think an impression of weathering is good enough.
I take the points above about people preferring non-weathered stock but I find it nice to have the ability to  make up a couple of trains with weathered stock.
On my layout - when I get round to laying the track!! - I am modelling a preserved railway (North Hampshire preserved railway). The pristine stock is reserved for the punters and the weathered stock for daily maintenance and supply duties.
 :beers:
Size matters - especially if you don't have a lot of space - and N gauge is the answer!

Bob Austin

Offline austinbob

  • Trade Count: (+3)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23835
  • Posts: 4441
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #26 on: July 17, 2015, 09:24:39 PM »
On the plus side, such models don't need additional weathering on the part of the owner, and that means you can run realistic-looking trains without reducing the resale value of your collectable model.
Good point NeMo - never thought of that.
 :beers:
Size matters - especially if you don't have a lot of space - and N gauge is the answer!

Bob Austin

Offline Bealman

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23151
  • Posts: 18398
  • Country: au
  • Gender: Male
  • Promotion remains in the future
    • Awards
Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #27 on: July 18, 2015, 12:40:53 AM »
Yeah, I'm with  NPN on this one - it's good enough for me and certainly far better than I could do meself.

I must remind people at this point, though, that several of our members are very good at weathering, and have posted some excellent photos and tutorials on the subject.

So if anyone feels like having a shot at it, the information is here!  :thumbsup:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline JasonBz

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1120
  • Country: england
    • Awards
Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #28 on: July 18, 2015, 12:51:05 AM »
Most factory "weathering" is a dash of uniform dirty brown blown over from a air brush, its not weathering as such.
Why people pay so much extra for something so simple is so far beyond me I cant explain it!!

Online Ben A

  • Revolution Trains
  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 9835
  • Posts: 2138
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • NGS VP, Model Rail contributor, Revolution founder
    • Revolution Trains
    • Awards
Re: Factory weathering
« Reply #29 on: July 18, 2015, 03:01:58 AM »

Hello all,

Last time I asked Farish about this I was told they do weathered models because they sell.

In my view, is almost impossible to realistically weather a model - especially in N - without an airbrush and the skill to use it - and many people have neither the enthusiasm or space/cash/aptitude for this. For these people factory weathering is an ideal way to enhance the realism of their models.

I would add however that like anything, the weathering needs to be done well.  The Chinese are very good at copying something exactly, but not so good at producing artistic interpretations themselves.  The best weathered factory models in my view are the Dapol Westerns, 22s and silver bullets produced while Dave Jones was there. His methodology was to send a model to Ian at Mercig, get him to weather it properly, then send that model to China with the instruction "copy this" which they did brilliantly.

Cheers

Ben A.



 

Please Support Us!
April Goal: £60.00
Due Date: Apr 30
Total Receipts: £30.00
Below Goal: £30.00
Site Currency: GBP
50% 
April Donations

anything
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal