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Author Topic: Baseboard questions  (Read 1143 times)

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Online chrism

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Re: Baseboard questions
« Reply #15 on: September 13, 2019, 06:31:35 AM »
One thing I haven't seen mentioned about the extruded foam (eg Celotex/Kingspan stuff) is that it can shrink like heck after cutting.
I used it for the scenery on Coniston and one length I cut and carved to make the cliff behind the goods yard went like a banana surprisingly quickly because the underside was the original surface as manufactured and the upper side was carved.
Therefore it's important to seal any cut surfaces as soon as you can - you don't want baseboard edges shrinking away from their framing or from each other.

Offline The Q

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Re: Baseboard questions
« Reply #16 on: September 13, 2019, 09:04:15 AM »
Technically Celotex is not any form of Polystyrene, its polyisocyanurate Foam with a sheet of tin foil top and bottom..

 If you use Celotex, the strength is in the tin foil, if you remove one side it will turn into a banana. You have to use a complete sheet WITHOUT carving as a baseboard, Glue another on top and carve that.

I've not had any problem with shrinkage because once a board is cut to size, then edging is imediately glued on, including as a single piece that for the edges of any upper layers..

Offline Thebaz

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Re: Baseboard questions
« Reply #17 on: September 13, 2019, 02:14:58 PM »
One thing I haven't seen mentioned about the extruded foam (eg Celotex/Kingspan stuff) is that it can shrink like heck after cutting.
I used it for the scenery on Coniston and one length I cut and carved to make the cliff behind the goods yard went like a banana surprisingly quickly because the underside was the original surface as manufactured and the upper side was carved.
Therefore it's important to seal any cut surfaces as soon as you can - you don't want baseboard edges shrinking away from their framing or from each other.

What would you use to seal the edges? Should this be done after I split the boards (and before I add the ply frame?)

Online chrism

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Re: Baseboard questions
« Reply #18 on: September 13, 2019, 04:04:59 PM »
One thing I haven't seen mentioned about the extruded foam (eg Celotex/Kingspan stuff) is that it can shrink like heck after cutting.
I used it for the scenery on Coniston and one length I cut and carved to make the cliff behind the goods yard went like a banana surprisingly quickly because the underside was the original surface as manufactured and the upper side was carved.
Therefore it's important to seal any cut surfaces as soon as you can - you don't want baseboard edges shrinking away from their framing or from each other.

What would you use to seal the edges? Should this be done after I split the boards (and before I add the ply frame?)

A liberal coating of PVA seemed to fix mine OK. Obviously, being just scenery, it soon got paint, etc. on top as well.
I'd suggest you do it as soon as possible after cutting.

Offline The Q

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Re: Baseboard questions
« Reply #19 on: September 14, 2019, 04:28:40 PM »
One thing I haven't seen mentioned about the extruded foam (eg Celotex/Kingspan stuff) is that it can shrink like heck after cutting.
I used it for the scenery on Coniston and one length I cut and carved to make the cliff behind the goods yard went like a banana surprisingly quickly because the underside was the original surface as manufactured and the upper side was carved.
Therefore it's important to seal any cut surfaces as soon as you can - you don't want baseboard edges shrinking away from their framing or from each other.

What would you use to seal the edges? Should this be done after I split the boards (and before I add the ply frame?)
If you are putting the frame on then the liberal coat of PVA can be used to glue the frame on at the same time..

Offline Thebaz

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Re: Baseboard questions
« Reply #20 on: September 24, 2019, 05:09:17 PM »
Well, I've been doing my homework and I've settled upon a foam baseboard design which incorporates many of your suggestions from the dowels to the toggle catch. Utilised my AutoCAD skills to knock up a plan that I'm happy with and will be able to take off the quantities to make sure I'm buying the right amount number of bits (shouldn't be too hard tbh!!)

See pdf attachment for plans and let  me know if you have any comments  :)

Offline The Q

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Re: Baseboard questions
« Reply #21 on: September 24, 2019, 08:28:59 PM »
I note you've marked up for expanded polystyrene,  I would recommend extruded polystyrene it's much stiffer and better for baseboards..

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Re: Baseboard questions
« Reply #22 on: September 25, 2019, 01:33:58 AM »
Yes you absolutely need to use XPS, Extruded Polystyrene. Here in the US its used as wall insulation and is available 1/2", 1", and 2" thick. It is much denser than white polystyrene foam used as packing material, so it can be cut much more accurately, without a lot of mess.

Regards,

John P

Check out my layout thread.

Contemporary NW (Wigan Wallgate and North Western)

https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=39501.msg476247#msg476247

Offline Thebaz

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Re: Baseboard questions
« Reply #23 on: September 25, 2019, 09:04:41 AM »
I note you've marked up for expanded polystyrene,  I would recommend extruded polystyrene it's much stiffer and better for baseboards..
Yes you absolutely need to use XPS, Extruded Polystyrene. Here in the US its used as wall insulation and is available 1/2", 1", and 2" thick. It is much denser than white polystyrene foam used as packing material, so it can be cut much more accurately, without a lot of mess.


Thanks for looking at my plans and commenting. Truth is I haven't yet decided whether to use polystyrene or say, the Kingspan stuff. I've read of people making a success out of using polystyrene, so I wanted to keep that as an option especially as the XPS stuff is about 400% more expensive! I note your points about XPS being a lot easier and therefoere, neater to cut so I suspect I will probably go down that road in the end.

My main concern now is cutting the ply as I only have a manual carpenters' saw. Should I try to get hold of better cutting equipment or would I do fine with the manual saw. I've read about the correct side up to place it for cutting so presumably if I stick to that I should be okay?

Offline ntpntpntp

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Re: Baseboard questions
« Reply #24 on: September 25, 2019, 10:15:09 AM »

My main concern now is cutting the ply as I only have a manual carpenters' saw. Should I try to get hold of better cutting equipment or would I do fine with the manual saw.
Although I have electric circular saws, jig saws, and a band saw, I still prefer to cut ply baseboard frame pieces with a hand saw on a Workmate. Just make sure the teeth are in good condition and sharp. Cut with the teeth running on the outside edge of the cut line, go gently without lots of pressure and let the saw do the work.

Quote
I've read about the correct side up to place it for cutting so presumably if I stick to that I should be okay?
Don't think I've ever heard of that in all the decades I've been cutting ply. Presume it's maybe something to do with grain direction when cutting?  I've never had a problem.
Nick.   2016 celebrating the 20th anniversary of "Königshafen" exhibition layout!

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Re: Baseboard questions
« Reply #25 on: September 25, 2019, 10:19:50 AM »
I have cut  thick (9mm) ply with a jigsaw all me life without problem.

And that includes a circular hole for a Fleischmann  turntable!

However, eye protection is recommended.  :beers:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Online chrism

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Re: Baseboard questions
« Reply #26 on: September 25, 2019, 10:26:51 AM »
I've read about the correct side up to place it for cutting so presumably if I stick to that I should be okay?
Don't think I've ever heard of that in all the decades I've been cutting ply. Presume it's maybe something to do with grain direction when cutting?  I've never had a problem.

Since most ply is an odd number of layers, the grain will run the same way on both surfaces so I doubt it's that. Ive never had a problem either, cutting in whichever direction I wish.

Online Bealman

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Re: Baseboard questions
« Reply #27 on: September 25, 2019, 10:32:10 AM »
If it is warped, I cut from the up side, while trying to keep the ends level.

I do this on a driveway, which itself is on a slope!  :beers:

I think that have a clear game plan, and take care is the solution here.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2019, 10:34:56 AM by Bealman »
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline The Q

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Re: Baseboard questions
« Reply #28 on: September 25, 2019, 12:02:39 PM »
Some Plywoods are "Good One Side" that means the top layer one side should have no blemishes or patches. The really cheap DIY shed stuff is often of this type.
If you are using it varnished in furniture you need to cut and use the correct side visible.
For a model railway you're going to cover it in paint and polyfilla anyway so for a flat earth top it doesn't matter. If you are however going to use it for say a lighting arch facia. Then get the correct side facing out, you don't want the patches showing through the paint.

As for what to use, a electric jigsaw with a comparitively smooth blade is good for cutting precision smooth edges. But Chippendale used hand tools, you can produce quality work with hand tools, it just takes longer.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2019, 12:10:23 PM by The Q »

 

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