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Author Topic: Woodcliffe.  (Read 8085 times)

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Offline The Yorkshire Pud

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Woodcliffe.
« on: December 02, 2012, 11:47:21 PM »
Evening all.   :D

Thought I would start a thread in here, now I've finally got something to show.


First up, a little bit of an intro .......


Well, I posted a while back in a thread in the Kato track section, about this guys efforts on RMWeb, and how I was going to give his adopted method a go.

Here's the link so you get the idea of what I'm after doing .......


http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/38509-japanese-prototype-n-scale-desktop-layout/


And also here's the link he posts, showing the site that basically inspired him (its all in Japanese, but keep clicking the links, and the oodles of photos speak for themselves!!)


http://space.geocities.jp/popoya2008/menu.html


As is often the case, I'm pushed for space at home ....... I was previously in the early stages of my very first layout (in 00 gauge) but changing circumstances at home halted progress, and to cut a long story short I switched to N gauge.

Originally I was going to build a smallish layout on a Foam Board, but after seeing this method, and trying out Kato track myself, I was sold on trying this.

The idea is to build a layout, but in small modules ....... the standard size is around a foot long, but in varying widths, and utilising the Unitrack to join them together.

In theory, you can build your layout as small or large as you like, and it can (because the modules can be interchanged) have a variety of looks, styles, industries ....... just a case of build it how you like ....... its a bit freelancy I grant you, but I'm in it for the modelling enjoyment, so I'll just see where it takes me !!    :whistle:


So this is what a typical module looks like with the Kato Unitrack glued down .......





I am using 18mm thick MDF ....... the pieces being accurately cut at my local DIY shop.

The pieces are then glued and nailed together to form the basic module, and the Kato track (1 off S248 and 1 off S64 in the case of this particular type of module) clipped together and glued down.

The track protrudes at each end of the module by around 1mm, so allowing just enough clearance for clipping each module together, and unclipping without damaging your work.



The next few pictures are the ones I posted in the other thread I mentioned.

They show my first ever efforts at brush painting the sleepers with a mix of Tamiya Acrylic Dark Grey XF-24 to which I added a little Red Brown XF-64 to warm it up a tad.

I also painted the rail sides with Red Brown XF-64, which is a pretty good stab at a rusty rail colour in my book.





Then I started to ballast the track (another first for me) using a mix of Woodland Scenics Fine Buff (1 full bag) to which I added Fine Grey (14 teaspoons looked about right to me) ....... my method was simple really ...... I painted in between the sleepers with neat PVA adhesive using a small brush, around 4 inches at a time, and then sprinkled the ballast on top.

The centre of the track was done first, and then each side in small sections ....... I found after and hour the excess ballast could be tapped off gently ( small module bonus ...... you couldn't do that with a large layout !!) and gently flicked away with a soft brush.

Here's my efforts ........ First the middle of the rails ........





Then the finished ballasting with my Class 66 sat on so you can see the size of the thing.




I was pleased with the end result ....... for my first go at ballasting I reckon its not too bad.    :bounce:

There were a few areas that I have subsequently gone over, but not to any great depth ....... just tidying up really.

Which brings me now up to date ........

Here is the same module I ballasted, but a month or so later (Its been slow progress due to lack of spare time, but recently things have eased, so its going great guns now)





I have basically borrowed the idea for my first module from the other guy on RMWeb, just to get the ball rolling ....... hey, its a good idea anyhoo, so why not !!

To say I'm well chuffed is a BIG understatement !!   :D

The front (brown painted) side of the hill is 6mm MDF, as is the right hand end and along the back.

The hill profile over the Tunnel and along the back is layers of pink foam board (actually the board I originally bought to make my layout on) which was carved with a long bladed craft knife ...... the disposable type with the long blades that you can snap off in sections.

The tunnel mouth is a Faller Foam one that came ready painted, and the retaining walls are from Noch...... also ready painted foam which were cut to size.

These are glued on with PVA, as was all the foam/MDF.

The grassy areas around the ballast are done using Gaugemaster (Noch) Meadow Grass Flock (again PVA glue and sprinkled on top, a bit at a time to get a variety of depths)

The bushes are Faller Premium Clump Foliage ...... mostly Light Green, but with patches of Intermediate Green here and there for variety, and there are a few small stones glued in places too.

I added a little of the Meadow Grass in between the rails too in a couple of places, just to give it some weeds, and also a little on the butresses of the retaining walls.

Here's a final pic with the same Class 66 sat on again ...... looks a bit different now !!





The module is 95% finished I reckon ...... just small details here and there to play around with ....... the major one being the Tunnel, which is still bare pink foam inside, so I need to sort out a lining for that.

Well, thats the state of play so far with module No. 1 .......  whadda' ya think ?

I'm hoping to make a start on the next one this week if all goes well.

Cheers !!

Bilbo.   
« Last Edit: December 14, 2012, 12:23:44 AM by bilbo baggins »

Offline scotsoft

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Re: Kato Modules.
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2012, 12:47:16 AM »
Hi bilbo,

I could take your own quote "To say I'm well chuffed is a BIG understatement !!" and leave it there.

You have made an excellent job of your first module and you have every right to be well chuffed.  No one would ever guess that this is your first attempt and I feel safe enough to say if you entered that into a competition you would definitely win a prize.

cheers John.

Online Lawrence

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Re: Kato Modules.
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2012, 09:47:32 AM »
I know exactly who you are talking about bilbo, it is an ingenious way of building a layout.  I take you will be doing more and connecting them up?
Super little module, nice work  :thumbsup:

Offline Tank

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Re: Kato Modules.
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2012, 10:07:25 AM »
Absolutely wonderful!  It just shows what can be done to mask Unitrack. :thankyousign:

Offline The Yorkshire Pud

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Re: Kato Modules.
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2012, 10:17:01 PM »
Thanks very much gents ...... you are all too kind !!   :thumbsup:

To answer your question Lawrence ...... Yes, the idea now is to do more modules , especially as the first one has turned out so well.

I'm aiming eventually for a roundy roundy layout, but the beauty of this system is that you can also link a few together to make a shunting plank, or whatever else configuration wise you can dream up.

Rather than a fixed layout, it can be a layout of many faces .......... the small nature of each module helped clinch the deal for me too ........ not having heaps of work to do ahead of me each time is of great appeal.


bilbo.   :thankyousign: 


Offline The Yorkshire Pud

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Re: Kato Modules.
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2012, 10:21:46 PM »
Evening all.   :wave:

Just a few more pics to post this evening.

Firstly a view showing the back of the first module, to give you an idea of the construction method.

Again, 6mm thick MDF was used as a back board to mark out the basic shape of the hill.





This next view shows the end of the module with the inside of the tunnel visible ....... still need to line this yet when I source some thin plastic sheet ........ probably stone effect to match the tunnel.





I recieved my latest goodies in the post today, courtesy of Hattons ....... I'm basically modelling Modern Image, but in my (model railway) world, the line will also see traffic in the form of an occasional Heritage Railway Steam excursion ....... and here she is .......






What a beaut of a model !!

Graham Farish Stanier Black 5 (early crest) pulling Mk1 carriages ....... 3 in Custard and Cream ...... plus one in Maroon.

I ran it in this afternoon and it was perfect, straight from the box ....... slow running was excellent too ....... this is my first close up of an N gauge steam loco (personally running one I mean) and I am mighty impressed with the complex running gear in something so small.    :thumbsup:

I got the idea for the particular train to model on my layout from years of seeing the NYMR running in and out of Whitby, and the Black 5 is such a lovely Steam Loco anyway, so it was a no brainer !!  :D

Here's another slightly higher shot of the train exiting the tunnel ....... looks mighty fine to me !!





I can't wait to get some more modules made, so I can enjoy this train running through the miniature countryside.

Well, thats me lot for now.

bilbo.    :thumbsup:

Offline scotsoft

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Re: Kato Modules.
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2012, 10:27:49 PM »
Very good Bilbo, from your comments I presume there will be a flurry of countryside building happening  ;)

Have you started your next module yet and have you an idea of what you are doing for it?

cheers John.

Offline The Yorkshire Pud

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Re: Kato Modules.
« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2012, 11:14:11 PM »
Hiya John mate   :thumbsup:

Ta for the post !!

I managed to make a start yesterday on the next module ....... I'm building the hill behind the tunnel (to the right).

It will be a slightly quicker (I hope !!) task than the first module, as I won't need to paint the rails/sleepers or ballast the track, seeing as it will be totally hidden.

Just need to remember to leave the back open in case of derailments !!

Behind this will then be a corner module which turns 90 degrees to the right, and the other end of the tunnel will exit after this.


I am also hoping to make a start on the module to the left too ...... I already have the track and the girder bridge that will be on it. (again, the idea is borrowed from the other guy on RMWeb)

The basic wood for this particular module will be upside down, to allow the dip in the ground to be modelled, over which the bridge goes.

Thats as far as my thinking goes at the moment  ........ as I've said before, I'm not working to any particular plan, just seeing where it all ends up !!

I'll post up pics when I've summat to show.

I reckon I'll need to think of a name for the layout soon though ....... Kato modules just doesn't quite cut it !!   :hmmm:

bilbo.


Offline scotsoft

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Re: Kato Modules.
« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2012, 11:33:58 PM »
Are you going to use the Kato girder bridge?
I have a couple of their double track girder bridges and I just think they are superb.
The hill you on the right having an open back is a sound idea just in case of derailments.
You sound as if you know where you are going for the next few modules anyway which will help for buying the pieces needed.

The naming does seem to give a few headaches though  :headbutt:
I hope you get a few suggestions to help you on your way  :help: :help:

cheers John.

Offline The Yorkshire Pud

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Re: Kato Modules.
« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2012, 01:09:57 AM »
Yes mate ..... the one I have is the Kato Deck Plate Girder Bridge S124T (single track) in a Red Oxide colour ...... very nicely made it is too.

I reckon I've enough to keep me occupied for a while !! ....... for running me trains at the mo' I'll just have to rely on the small oval I have from Kato set M1.

As for the name ....... well my previous attempt at a layout (in OO gauge) that stalled was called "Riverside Cement"

I had to put this project on the back burner, due to changing circumstances at home.

I lost my Dad last Christmas, and the project was just too much to be dealing with, so I decided to go smaller and less complicated for now.

I kinda got hooked on this Kato N gauge though !! ...... so I don't know when I'll get back to it.

Shame really, as I'd put a lot of work into it, but at the mo' as I said, its just been put to one side.

I posted the progress on RMWeb if you are interested in seeing my efforts.

Here's the link .......

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/53009-riverside-cement/page__fromsearch__1

I log in as The Yorkshire Pud on there (edit .. now changed to bilbo baggins over there too)  ...... not been on the site much lately though, as I said, been a bit preoccupied lately, but I'm glad to be on this site and modelling again, albeit in a smaller gauge !!

I'd like to incorporate some kind of water into this effort though, so the name might have "Riverside" somewhere in it, or maybe "Lakeside"

We'll see ...... get me thinking cap on eh ?    :hmmm:

Cheers John.

bilbo.    :thumbsup:
« Last Edit: December 09, 2012, 07:54:47 PM by bilbo baggins »

Offline Anthony Lloyd

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Re: Kato Modules.
« Reply #10 on: December 09, 2012, 09:09:02 PM »
I feel safe enough to say if you entered that into a competition you would definitely win a prize.
Quick sprinkle with some grated styrophome ... and you could win the Christmas Diorama competition  :D

It looks excellent and you should be proud of it. I like the concept of this modular system. I could build my little bit, you could build yours, and its small enough to sit on the seat of a car so when you want to play trains with a friend, just bring your bits round to mine ... or vice versa.

I look forward to seeing these progress.

Offline The Yorkshire Pud

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Re: Kato Modules.
« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2012, 09:29:26 PM »
Thanks very much Tony    :thumbsup:

It is rather a good concept ....... perfect for those with not much space for a bigger more permanent layout.

The ease at which the modules clip together and apart, also mean that any layout built using this method can be up and running in no time at all.

Once you accept the limitations on width for each module, its quite a nifty way of railway modelling.

Nice to have you following along mate.

cheers.

bilbo.



Offline intraclast

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Re: Kato Modules.
« Reply #12 on: December 12, 2012, 12:35:16 PM »
Hi Bilbo,

I find this very interesting as I currently have no fixed place to build my imagined model railway, which combined with the fact that I seem to be in a perpetual state of house renovation/decoration means I haven't got anywhere yet despite planning it for a year.  I've skimmed through the RMweb post you refer to and looked at the pictures (there is a lot!) on the japanese site and it looks really good. I would, as you say, have to get used to the narrow nature of the layout though.

My question is, do you think you have to use Kato track? I understand that it simpler to click together, but do you think the concept would work for regular track? I was hoping to use Wayne's code 40 track when I eventually get started. I was thinking of having dowels a fixed distance each side of the track for locating and alignment and using some kind of electrical connectors on each end of each module to link together to make the power bus. Can you think of any problems with this? should I be looking to use Kato track instead for a project like this?

Also, I was wondering where you were planning to lay it out when you have enough modules to run trains on it. Is it destined for desk or table, or will it be placed gently on the floor?

Thanks

Mark

Offline polo2k

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Re: Kato Modules.
« Reply #13 on: December 12, 2012, 03:59:40 PM »
Speaking of interboard connecitions, MERG`s CBUS would be ideal. On my YVRR I have 6 wires running as a Bus along the back of the layout and these do everything

DCC - left rail
DCC - Right rail
12v - Red wire
0v - Black wire
Cbus comms High
Cbus comms Low

Basically its like having USB on the layout. You need a "producer" module (i.e. a phisical control panel or pc program). Then each module would have a "consumer" module (combination modules exist for feedback).

Whit this system, only the modules that are plugged in are in use, the lack of the others does not matter. Modules can be linked in various ways.

By using a producer/consumer module on each board, you could use the outputs for points/ animations, signals etc and then the inputs could supply the system with info about the location of the train for signaling.

It seems really daunting at first, however I would take the same steps again, if I had to choose between learning how to use CBUS and wiring massive D-subs again, Id take the CBUS every day.

In terms of expandability and reliability, the communications protocol is the same as a lot of cars use for diagnostics.
Cheers
-Ash-



The only way to guarantee failure, is not to try

Offline The Yorkshire Pud

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Re: Kato Modules.
« Reply #14 on: December 12, 2012, 10:40:33 PM »
My question is, do you think you have to use Kato track? I understand that it simpler to click together, but do you think the concept would work for regular track? I was hoping to use Wayne's code 40 track when I eventually get started. I was thinking of having dowels a fixed distance each side of the track for locating and alignment and using some kind of electrical connectors on each end of each module to link together to make the power bus. Can you think of any problems with this? should I be looking to use Kato track instead for a project like this?

Also, I was wondering where you were planning to lay it out when you have enough modules to run trains on it. Is it destined for desk or table, or will it be placed gently on the floor?



Hi Mark   :)

I see no reason why other types or makes of track wouldn't work just as well with this modular system.

The only thing as you say, is having some form of dowel system for accurate lining up of each module ........ this is one of the reasons that Kato so appeals to me personally ........ the trackwork clicks together, thus negating the need for any other method of lining up.

Also you would need to link each module electrically, and there are many very good methods of doing this, as polo2k shows in his post ....... I would go down this route 100% if I was you and building a permanent layout, but for the small modules (if you plan on making them this small) the decision is yours to make !!  .......  :hmmm:

At the moment, I just wanted to be railway modelling without any extra work or hassle ....... Kato suits me fine !!

Also the need for a power bus or any extra wiring is done away with pretty much ........ granted, I am relying purely on the fishplates for electrical flow, but with the modules being so small, any power problems in the future should be minor, and pretty simple to pin down and rectify.

As for where I intend to run my layout ....... well like I said before, I can run some of the modules linked together (like a shunting plank) on my table, maybe with a small fiddle yard attached, but my intention eventually is to make the layout a full circuit, so I can run decent sized trains continuously.

My living room floor is just the spot ......... wooden flooring, and a nice open area which could accomodate a layout of around 10ft x 5ft ....... plenty sizable for N gauge !!

Thanks for the post.

bilbo.   :thumbsup:


 

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