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Author Topic: Plague workbench: Super GUV  (Read 684 times)

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Offline Flakmunky

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Re: Plague workbench: Super GUV
« Reply #15 on: May 20, 2020, 07:07:18 PM »
Looking good. I've been using the Evergreen sheets as well. Expensive but worth it. I'm about to start a goods shed, so may steal this idea of using it for a roller shutter. Thanks!

Online crewearpley40

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Re: Plague workbench: Super GUV
« Reply #16 on: May 20, 2020, 07:16:46 PM »
Maybe worth this idea as the stuff from suppliers is for larger scales . I used 10  20 and 30 thou with stiff plasticard on the inside of a shed I have modelled

Online Jim Martin

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Re: Plague workbench: Super GUV
« Reply #17 on: Yesterday at 05:35:34 PM »
So, after a couple of evenings off, here we are again. The apertures for the shutters have all been done; while in other news, the body has not quite split in two! The current state of affairs is shown in these pictures. In the first, you can see how I've had to cut a recess at each door position for the shutter unit to rest in (as you can probably tell from the shoddy workmanship here, the shutters aren't actually going to be attached along their top edge, although I might fill the gap between them and the plastic behind them).



Here you can see just how floppy the body moulding has become. I'm wondering if it wouldn't be easier just to snap it in half now and work on each part separately until it's actually necessary to reattach them. None of the area where it would break is going to be visible on the finished model, after all.



Remaining work on the body is filling the windows (I did say that I was going to refit the glazing and paint over it, but I'm considering filling them with styrene and filler to get a smoother finish) and working on the ends.

A word on the ends: you can see in photos I've posted over the last few days that there's a load of filler all over them. That's because of how I dealt with the end detail. The GUV has end doors, which aren't needed for the Super GUV. The Farish end mouldings are tremendously thick and incorporate both the end profile (i.e. between the ends of the body sides, including the curve of the roofline) and the end doors, which have a lot of frame/hinge/strap detail and protrude a fair bit beyond the end of the body. After contemplating sanding the doors away, I decided to saw the entire face off the end of the body. This is a bit of a nightmare from a health and safety perspective, but it got the job done. Unfortunately, I ended up with a jagged trench down the middle of each end where I hadn't had the saw blade quite vertical. I didn't saw right through the end at any point, but I came quite close. Hence all the filler.

Next up is building the shutter units, then I'll get onto the remaining fiddling with the sides and ends. I took delivery of what might be a lifetime supply of 1200-grade wet and dry a few days ago, so I think that everything I need is on hand.

Jim


Believe me. These things always have a logical explanation usually

Online exmouthcraig

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Re: Plague workbench: Super GUV
« Reply #18 on: Yesterday at 05:45:38 PM »
DONT SNAP THE BODY JIM!!!!!

Can you not layer up some strips of plasticard inside the actual GUV itself to get some strength back?? You might even be able to drill out and square file the missing slots to clip the roof panel back in.

I would take measurements from the glazing and create a window sized block that can fit in to flush up and then have a bigger piece to glue around the back of the opening, this will get a bit of strength back and only need a smear of filler around the outside of the panel.

Online crewearpley40

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Re: Plague workbench: Super GUV
« Reply #19 on: Yesterday at 05:54:17 PM »
Seconded that view.

Online Jim Martin

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Re: Plague workbench: Super GUV
« Reply #20 on: Yesterday at 06:15:38 PM »
I certainly could add some reinforcement to the body. In fact, I don't have much choice: it's just a question of when it happens. I suspect that I'll end up practically lining the model with styrene to hold everything together :worried:. I was wondering if it might not be easier to work on the ends with the body in two halves.

I'm really coming round to the idea of filling the windows. The glazing isn't quite as deep as the sides, so when it's just painted over (as it is on Farish's RES-liveried GUVs) it shows as a window-shaped depression.
Believe me. These things always have a logical explanation usually

Online exmouthcraig

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Re: Plague workbench: Super GUV
« Reply #21 on: Yesterday at 06:42:04 PM »
I'm guessing that your glueing the roller doors into the body as well Jim???

I'd beef the roof up and get that straight and true, working from one end get both doors on and work your way down the van installing both pairs ensuring that your body is staying true and straight.

Get the window blanking panels in and secure to make sure that you can get a decent solid square true van back and that the roof panel fits.

Then when its solid I'd work on the ends filing back and get it into primer to see what fettling needs to be done.

Once this ones done the rest will be easy  :)

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Plague workbench: Super GUV
« Reply #22 on: Yesterday at 09:26:30 PM »
Me being me would fit full length floor to ceiling glazing e.g. overhead projector sheet to beef the whole thing up. The shutters will be covering the glazing anyway.
Just putting it out there. (And you thought I was mad :laugh3:)

Online Jim Martin

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Re: Plague workbench: Super GUV
« Reply #23 on: Yesterday at 09:35:54 PM »
Hi Craig, I think the question can be framed as "will what I gain from working on a smaller piece (and I think there would be some advantages) be outweighed by the difficulties of trying to reassemble the bits while working around parts that had already been completed, particularly the arrangement of end-to-end reinforcement of the body"?

To be honest, I'm leaning towards a sequence along the lines that you proposed. Fitting the shutters will restore a fair bit of structural strength, although I'll be adding something at roof level as well.

Jim
Believe me. These things always have a logical explanation usually

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Re: Plague workbench: Super GUV
« Reply #24 on: Yesterday at 09:37:55 PM »
A compromise with both suggestions would help

Online Jim Martin

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Re: Plague workbench: Super GUV
« Reply #25 on: Today at 07:53:36 PM »
Well there was literally zero love for my idea of letting nature take its course and allowing the body to break in two, then fixing it later. To be honest, I was tending away from it anyway, since the amount of faffing about that would have arisen around the middle of the body seemed to get more and more, the more I planned out the work to be done.

That means that the next order of business, which may or may not happen this evening, has to be sorting out the reinforcement, because the body is very close to splitting. The problem manifests at the centre of the vehicle because removing the original doors leaves only the width of the sub-roof holding everything together, and at the central doors that weakness coincides with a pair of holes where the roof clips on. At that point, then, the body consists of four tabs about 1mm wide, which is not a lot of styrene.

Jim

Believe me. These things always have a logical explanation usually

Online exmouthcraig

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Re: Plague workbench: Super GUV
« Reply #26 on: Today at 08:16:01 PM »
I get why you wanted to split it Jim but I think you will bring too many problems trying to get them back together.

I'd definitely reinforce the structure prior to working on the ends. Plastic will never go back the way it was before it split and when you have no tolerance for the roof fit and the chassis it's too precise to get everything back together.

Once you get the doors and reinforcements back in the ends will be rigid enough to work on.

Splitting them may work but I'm not going to suggest you try. You have the ability to strengthen up the existing which you know fits both roof and chassis which will save you alot of headaches later, as well as saving the actual model

Online crewearpley40

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Re: Plague workbench: Super GUV
« Reply #27 on: Today at 08:24:24 PM »
Reinforce. Prevention better than cure

 

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