!!

Not Registered?

Welcome!  Please register to view all of the new posts and forum boards - some of which are hidden to guests.  After registering and gaining 10 posts you will be able to sell and buy items on our N'porium.

If you have any problems registering, then please check your spam filter before emailing us.  Hotmail users seem to find their emails in the Junk folder.


Thanks for reading,
The NGF Staff.

Author Topic: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread  (Read 522 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline AC

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 14125
  • Posts: 148
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
    • Awards
AC's Occasional Modelling Thread
« on: April 26, 2020, 03:16:38 PM »
I don't very often sit down and get any modelling done, it's been a while since I did anything to any of my layouts, but thought I'd start a thread for anything N gauge that I do that isn't destined for a specifc layout and doesn't deserve it's own topic.

Recently I've been going through a lot of my model railway stuff and sorting it all out so that it's better organised. Amongst the items not touched in a while, I found a box containing the parts and a rough sketch for a kit bash project I began in 2014. The project didn't progress very far at the time, but the intention was to combine the parts from three Kestrel Designs kits into a larger row of buildings as a single unit.

The photo below shows as far as I got when I originally started the project.



Top left are two walls from the corner shop kit glued alongside each other to make a longer wall section and top right is the front of the single shop unit kit cut into two sections, with the aim of using both halves in different places.

Below those are the two walls from a four house unit, with one of them cut down to reduce it's length. The lower wall section will need to be cut to the right of the doors in the middle to mirror the one above it.

My original plan was to build an L shaped unit with the shortened four house unit connected to one side of a modified corner shop and the shortened single shop kit extending off the other side of the corner shop kit.

One problem I found with the kits was that the brick courses don't all line up across the different buildings. So when lining up the rows of bricks where I've joined parts together along the faces, there are some height differences, which result in gaps below some of the wall sections once assembled.

The next photo shows all the required parts cut to size and glued together awaiting assembly into the single building.



And then the walls assembled into the single building. I had thought about repositioning the chimneys, but decided it would be easier to use the original locations as intended in the kits.



A number of the door positions are probably a little unrealistic, especially around the back, but it was never going to be perfect. Overall, I don't think it looks too bad though.

The next problem was putting together the roof. The right hand sections of the corner shop kit were used as intended with the left hand sections being used as templates to cut down the roof sections that came with the four house unit. Unfortunately, the roof on the four house unit is moulded in thicker plastic than the roof in the corner shop kit, and because of this, I found it difficult to get them to fit neatly together which resulted in some minor gaps where I misjudged the angles.



Since the above photo was taken, I've added the rest of the roof. The end wall on the right is at a slight angle due to the front and back walls being slightly different lengths, but I found it easier to get that section of roof to fit neatly than the one on the other side.

I'm not sure what I'll do to improve the appearance of the joints in the roof yet. Then there's still windows and guttering, etc to add when I get round to it.
My NGF Layout Thread: Stanley Yard; a Model Railway in a Toolbox
My NGF Workbench Thread: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread

My Modelling Blog (Multiple Scales): AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
My Old Website: AC's Stuff

Offline exmouthcraig

  • Larger Gallery
  • Trade Count: (+7)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1804
    • Awards
Re: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2020, 03:47:25 PM »
Nice job AC, well as my trade is Roofing I would hope to be able to help you out a bit here.

Presumably as the shape this has taken with the angled front door this would of been a Victorian / Edwardian build, so the roof will be slates. Assuming that you plan to model it with slates????

3 different hip types available to you on a slate roof.

A close mitred hip. These are created by cutting the adjoining slates on the same course on the angle of the hip over the top of a fishtail soaker. The fishtail is a piece of lead under every course to prevent rain getting in.

This unfortunately cant happen because of the gap that you have in the roof covering so that leaves us

A hip tiled roof, quite simply a run of ridge tiles in a straight line from the gutter and mitred into the ridge tiles, this should not sit above the line of the ridges. Traditionally these period slate roofs would have terracotta ridges rather then blue clay just to give you a contrast. However blue ridges are very common. This could be created using 2 pieces of very thin plastruct rod probably 2 x 0.8mm flat and then welded down the middle and filed to a point, original ridges on a slate roof would be angled and not round.

The third option is a no expense spared, however very cheap for us to recreate. A lead roll hip. This is achieved by nailing a wood core roll down the hip blade, the slates are cut into this roll course by course. The roll will stand about 3" above the finished slate, then lead aprons are fixed onto this and dressed down each side and then flat onto the slate forming the lead roll. Not uncommon to have normal ridges at the ridge of the building but many would have a lead roll ridge as  well. We can achieve this by glueing a piece of plastruct round rod about 1.2mm down the hip, and then covering with a slice of masking tape cut to cover the slates by about 2mm either side, this can then be painted a dull grey silver to reflect lead.

I will dig out some pictures to explain each one a bit better if you need any

Offline AC

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 14125
  • Posts: 148
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
    • Awards
Re: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2020, 04:09:17 PM »
Thanks for the information. I think I understand them, but some pictures to confirm what they look like would be great, thanks.
My NGF Layout Thread: Stanley Yard; a Model Railway in a Toolbox
My NGF Workbench Thread: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread

My Modelling Blog (Multiple Scales): AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
My Old Website: AC's Stuff

Offline exmouthcraig

  • Larger Gallery
  • Trade Count: (+7)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1804
    • Awards
Re: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2020, 04:31:43 PM »
Close mitre slate hip


That's the fishtail soaker but you should never see them once its finished, it should also be a very straight line to the ridge

Lead roll hip, just for good measure we have a terracotta angled ridge hip behind as well



With all of them note how they all finish inline at the bottom of the roof into the gutter. There are many shockers out there, in reality and the model world. If you need any more help, just shout  :thumbsup:

Offline AC

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 14125
  • Posts: 148
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
    • Awards
Re: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2020, 05:17:11 PM »
Thanks, those photos help a lot. Hopefully I'll be able to manage a decent enough representation of the lead roll hip without messing up any more of the roof.
My NGF Layout Thread: Stanley Yard; a Model Railway in a Toolbox
My NGF Workbench Thread: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread

My Modelling Blog (Multiple Scales): AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
My Old Website: AC's Stuff

Offline exmouthcraig

  • Larger Gallery
  • Trade Count: (+7)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1804
    • Awards
Re: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread
« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2020, 05:35:27 PM »
Just practice on some scrap first AC you'll be able to work out what width tape you'll need and draw lines on both sides, form the roll down the whole length before flatting out onto the slate, make sure you stick into all the profiles of the slate, as the picture shows we dress it into every course to prevent winter lift, that's what the folded tags are for, you could replicate those with cuts of tape stuck on top

Offline AC

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 14125
  • Posts: 148
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
    • Awards
Re: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread
« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2020, 10:01:12 AM »
I've not got around to trying to finish the roof off yet regarding the small gaps at the joints, but thought I'd share this photo in here showing a 3D printed shop name board with door and window surround that I designed, posed in place on the building in my first post above.



I've not fixed it in place yet and it'll need painting, but it hides the lower section of the joint to the left of the door nicely. Still a joint visible above it though, but I don't think it's quite so obvious as it was.

If anyone's interested, there's more info on the 3D printed bit in my thread here; https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=49060.0
My NGF Layout Thread: Stanley Yard; a Model Railway in a Toolbox
My NGF Workbench Thread: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread

My Modelling Blog (Multiple Scales): AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
My Old Website: AC's Stuff

Offline lil chris

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23889
  • Posts: 3934
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread
« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2020, 10:17:48 AM »
Nice buildings, good bit of kit bashing which is my limitation with buildings. And thanks should go to exmouth Craig for help with roofs, always worth knowing stuff like that.
« Last Edit: May 17, 2020, 11:24:11 AM by lil chris, Reason: Spelling »
Lil Chris
My new layout here, Irwell Valley Railway. https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=47127.0

my old layout was East Lancashire Lines.

Offline exmouthcraig

  • Larger Gallery
  • Trade Count: (+7)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1804
    • Awards
Re: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2020, 10:28:20 AM »
@lil chris I could bore you all to tears with roofs and farming  :(

That's the limit of my topics of knowledge I'm afraid  :dunce:

Online crewearpley40

  • Larger Gallery
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 6665
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread
« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2020, 10:57:12 AM »
Nbodger maybe to help AC @Nbodger . Impressive structures. Look forward to progress

Online Nbodger

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 8788
  • Posts: 605
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread
« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2020, 01:36:46 PM »
Nbodger maybe to help AC @Nbodger . Impressive structures. Look forward to progress

Thanks for the tag @crewearpley40
I am not sure how much I can help AC as I have little experience of kit bashing, as I nearly always scratch build where possible, as you can build what you want to fit a location on the layout.

I must admit I am not a fan of Kestrel kits my preference, however they do have a place in the hobby. On my layout Hillsden I had always struggled to build a station building I was happy with. My first attempt which stood in place for a few years was scratch-built, but got assigned to the bin. I did purchase my one and only Kestrel kit, the town station to see if I could make something of it, in a fashion I did, which included a new scratch built roof, repositioning of chimneys and changes to the stonework around the windows, but it never got finished, so I went back to the drawing board and designed the current buildings which I am very happy with.

Looking at your building, which does look good by the way and your comments about stone / brickwork not lining up at the base, I would have been tempted to overlay the kit with embossed plastikard, by doing this taken the opportunity to adjust the door positions and chimneys you were not happy with and scratch built the roof with strips of tiles to match up.

The above is a lot of work and one has to look at the bigger picture, have I got the patience, the time, what am happy with.

This is not a criticism of what you have done, but an approach I would probably have undertaken.

If there is any help required at anytime you know where I am, always willing  to help where I am able.

Stay safe and well

Mike H 8)

Online crewearpley40

  • Larger Gallery
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 6665
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread
« Reply #11 on: May 17, 2020, 01:41:00 PM »
Thanks mike. It was purely to see if we can help ac with his roof issues. And offer suggestions. It's looking fine thus far ac. I would aim at reply #1 craig ' s idea of the lead role hip. Maybe look at Laurence 's doors windows in Marton hindmarche
« Last Edit: May 17, 2020, 01:47:25 PM by crewearpley40 »

Online Nbodger

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 8788
  • Posts: 605
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread
« Reply #12 on: May 17, 2020, 02:14:07 PM »
A lead rolled or tiled hip, could be constructed from say 10 tho plastikard or paper. The lead rolled could just be a plain strip , and a tiled hip would be the same plus scoring for the tiles. If you are careful you could fold a strip of plastikard but the easiest way is to have two strips and bond the end together in place on the model, then lightly sand to remove any seam.

Where you have two roofs abut each other, and the join shows, you could assume that one property has been re-roofed and lay a strip over to form an tiled overband like the tiles hip, colour on properties roof as old and weathered and the re-roofed property as new.

Could a down pipe cover the vertical wall joints?

Stay safe and well

Mike H  8)

Online crewearpley40

  • Larger Gallery
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 6665
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread
« Reply #13 on: May 17, 2020, 02:49:47 PM »
That was what I was thinking. I used 10 thou and finished with a tiny strip of foil the stuff we bake on

Offline jpendle

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23638
  • Posts: 1696
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: AC's Occasional Modelling Thread
« Reply #14 on: May 17, 2020, 03:46:25 PM »
There are many shockers out there, in reality and the model world. If you need any more help, just shout  :thumbsup:

So to be prototypically accurate, you can get away with bodged models because there are bodged roofs out there  :D

John P
Check out my layout thread.

Contemporary NW (Wigan Wallgate and North Western)

https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=39501.msg476247#msg476247

 

Please Support Us!
July Goal: £60.00
Due Date: Jul 31
Total Receipts: £55.00
Below Goal: £5.00
Site Currency: GBP
92% 
July Donations

anything
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal