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Author Topic: An early attempt...  (Read 922 times)

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Offline Stevie DC

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Re: An early attempt...
« Reply #15 on: March 18, 2020, 08:43:27 AM »
Thanks for the advice Steve, definitely looks like a 'less is more' approach is needed for the solder!

I great tip I was given is to cut small bits of solder (between 0.5mm and 1mm lengths) flux the joint and place the solder into the joint using tweezers. Then apply the iron to make a tack joint and check the alignments before reintroducing the iron and turning the tack(s) into a seam. Also wherever possible, try to solder from inside the model, that way most of the mess (if any) will be hidden and the amount of cleanup is lessened.

Most of the brake van below (a hacked 2mm Association kit), was done using this method and cleaned up with the glass fibre brush. However, I'm sure more mess will ensue when I solder the handrails into place - I've been putting this off for far too long!



So far you're doing a great job and I'm looking forward to seeing the brake van completed.

Offline Eggmarine

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Re: An early attempt...
« Reply #16 on: March 18, 2020, 11:24:49 AM »
Thanks for the advice Steve, definitely looks like a 'less is more' approach is needed for the solder!

I great tip I was given is to cut small bits of solder (between 0.5mm and 1mm lengths) flux the joint and place the solder into the joint using tweezers. Then apply the iron to make a tack joint and check the alignments before reintroducing the iron and turning the tack(s) into a seam. Also wherever possible, try to solder from inside the model, that way most of the mess (if any) will be hidden and the amount of cleanup is lessened.

Most of the brake van below (a hacked 2mm Association kit), was done using this method and cleaned up with the glass fibre brush. However, I'm sure more mess will ensue when I solder the handrails into place - I've been putting this off for far too long!



So far you're doing a great job and I'm looking forward to seeing the brake van completed.

Great model! Very neat and clean. Photos like that keep me inspired, thanks.  I did try the chopped up bits of solder method you suggest but i didn't get anywhere, perhaps due to the flux i was using which looks primarily for whitemetal but says it can also be used on brass.

I've also been using a pointed solder bit which i know isn't ideal for conducting heat, a chisel tipped one has just arrived however so i'm about to have another try.  Thanks again for the advice.

Offline Stevie DC

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Re: An early attempt...
« Reply #17 on: March 18, 2020, 08:16:09 PM »
Great model! Very neat and clean. Photos like that keep me inspired, thanks.  I did try the chopped up bits of solder method you suggest but i didn't get anywhere, perhaps due to the flux i was using which looks primarily for whitemetal but says it can also be used on brass.

I've also been using a pointed solder bit which i know isn't ideal for conducting heat, a chisel tipped one has just arrived however so i'm about to have another try.  Thanks again for the advice.

Thanks, it is quite messy on the inside though! I'm currently using Carrs Yellow flux and find that working above 310 degrees with the iron works best for 145 solder (my preference solder). A small tip will require more time to heat the metal sufficiently to get a good solder flow but give you much more control over where the heat is applied. I like to use a 3mm (or larger) tip whenever possible, going down to the small sizes for detail work and/or confined spaces.

Offline Eggmarine

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Re: An early attempt...
« Reply #18 on: March 21, 2020, 01:24:17 AM »
A further session on the queen mary this evening, i added to the rudimentary brake hangers with some nickel silver wire left over from the mineral wagon and some vacuum cylinders fabricated from some left over brass fret. They're bottomless but once it's on the rails no one will know!

The instructions suggest a plasticard roof but since all i had with me was brass i decided to make up a brass roof salvaged from another unstarted kit. It was bent to shape by rolling it under the curved edge of a large padlock of all things because it was what i had handy. The drain strips are more left over bits of fret.

The roof is tacked on so i can return and paint the internal bits and possibly glaze the model too. Not sure yet if i'll do that. The model needs bogies and buffers, bogies from the ngs shop as they have a suitable plastic effort and i'm eyeing up some buffers on ebay.











No handrails as yet due to no wire. I've got a guitar somewhere that comes with a stash of strings, not sure if a top E will be too thick i'll check tomorrow.

I'm interested to see how this will look after a coat of primer, the patchwork of solder and brass looks a bit shabby but i'm hoping she'll scrub up and take paint well.

Offline Eggmarine

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Re: An early attempt...
« Reply #19 on: April 18, 2020, 01:17:14 PM »
The task of applying the handrails didn't go well and ended up being a bit of a mess. I'm going to salvage the better parts of the brake van and rebuild using the lessons i've learned and the second backup etch bought from the ngs.
I'll add my workbench thread to my signature and put any further updates there. Thanks all!

Offline Stevie DC

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Re: An early attempt...
« Reply #20 on: April 19, 2020, 12:11:15 AM »
Handrails are always a bit of a swine in this scale. You'll find it much easier to solder them from the inside of the van and fix the roof as the last job - far less mess and cleaning up that way around. With what you've learnt so far, the next attempt should be an absolute stonker!  :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: An early attempt...
« Reply #21 on: April 19, 2020, 09:32:02 AM »
Handrails are always a bit of a swine in this scale. You'll find it much easier to solder them from the inside of the van and fix the roof as the last job - far less mess and cleaning up that way around.

@Stevie DC
That's the typical logical sort of solution that would never have crossed my mind and, apart from physical ability, is why I do very little bashing/building :-[

Offline Eggmarine

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Re: An early attempt...
« Reply #22 on: April 19, 2020, 09:40:45 AM »
Handrails are always a bit of a swine in this scale. You'll find it much easier to solder them from the inside of the van and fix the roof as the last job - far less mess and cleaning up that way around. With what you've learnt so far, the next attempt should be an absolute stonker!  :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Thanks Steve i think i'll try the next attempt by doing the hamd rails fairly early in the assembly.

Offline Stevie DC

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Re: An early attempt...
« Reply #23 on: April 19, 2020, 11:27:17 AM »
That's the typical logical sort of solution that would never have crossed my mind and, apart from physical ability, is why I do very little bashing/building :-[

Mick, how exactly do you think I ended up deciding that it was the best method?  :smiley-laughing: At only 5, the BHE LNER wagon body kits are a good way of making mistakes learning without too much of a pain financially.  ;)

Thanks Steve i think i'll try the next attempt by doing the hamd rails fairly early in the assembly.

No problem, don't add them too early as they might get damaged. I tend to put them on after everything else is assembled but before the roof. If you have one, use a fine bit in your soldering iron to keep the heat localised and reduce the chance of disturbing anything else.

Don't get disheartened, you're doing much better than I did for my first efforts.  :thumbsup:

Offline belstone

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Re: An early attempt...
« Reply #24 on: April 19, 2020, 11:56:33 AM »
Guitar wire is steel and probably won't solder very well.  Nickel silver is much better - I get mine in straight lengths from Nairnshire Modelling Supplies and use it for all sorts of things.  0.45mm is a little bit large diameter but easy to work with and not too fragile.

It's good to see someone having a go at etched kits and learning new skills along the way.  If you are going to make a habit of this, look at buying a resistance soldering unit (RSU).  It's like magical soldering.

Richard

Offline Stevie DC

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Re: An early attempt...
« Reply #25 on: April 19, 2020, 03:45:05 PM »
Guitar wire is steel and probably won't solder very well.  Nickel silver is much better - I get mine in straight lengths from Nairnshire Modelling Supplies and use it for all sorts of things.  0.45mm is a little bit large diameter but easy to work with and not too fragile.

It's good to see someone having a go at etched kits and learning new skills along the way.  If you are going to make a habit of this, look at buying a resistance soldering unit (RSU).  It's like magical soldering.

Richard

Hi Richard,

I use the non rusting wire which is nickel plated. I've not had a problem with soldering it so far.

 

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