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Author Topic: Useless at soldering, best connectors?  (Read 811 times)

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Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Useless at soldering, best connectors?
« Reply #30 on: February 23, 2020, 03:21:20 PM »
True. I got some red ones from Maplins before they bit the dust :(

Offline Corbie

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Re: Useless at soldering, best connectors?
« Reply #31 on: February 23, 2020, 08:42:26 PM »
Pre-grouping steam / LNER / early BR.

Offline lil chris

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Re: Useless at soldering, best connectors?
« Reply #32 on: February 23, 2020, 09:10:04 PM »
I found out how to use the other Wago connectors, just push the wire in , they do seem to prefer solid wire over multi strand. Some other connectors which are quite good I bought from my model shop, Gaugemaster Kwikonnect, I bought some two pin and 3 pin ones. I have not used them for bus wires I much prefer to solder those but they seem very sturdy and easy to use for any one trying to avoid soldering. Re the fish plates with pre soldered wires, I prefer not to use those, they are not much use if on a point and you need isolated joiners for example. Also I would imagine they would have the same problems normal  fish plates can eventually get with a bad connection.
Lil Chris
My new layout here, Irwell Valley Railway. https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=47127.0

my old layout was East Lancashire Lines.

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Useless at soldering, best connectors?
« Reply #33 on: February 23, 2020, 09:24:52 PM »
Re the fish plates with pre soldered wires, I prefer not to use those, they are not much use if on a point and you need isolated joiners for example. Also I would imagine they would have the same problems normal  fish plates can eventually get with a bad connection.

Had them on my layout for over 5 years now with no issues

Online crewearpley40

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Re: Useless at soldering, best connectors?
« Reply #34 on: February 23, 2020, 09:28:39 PM »
Useful items for those who find diy hard, have health issues and I admit I have used them though I do wish the wires were longer. I brought some last year and just thought could do with longer length of wire please shops with pre soldered fishplates

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Re: Useless at soldering, best connectors?
« Reply #35 on: April 01, 2020, 01:48:28 AM »
I am new to this thread but read with interest.

Soldering - key skill, there has been really good advice on working to develop the skill.   (if you are in northern California, I'm available for lessons  :) )

I use a bunch of Tortoise motors, I use an off the shelf edge connector with crimp contacts - I recommend this approach.

Also, I concur with the advice about using "helping hands" to hold wires in the right spot.  I often use one of those "two croc clips and a magnifying glass" things to help with wiring up d-sub connectors)

Question - is there a need for one of us to come up with a soldering iron add-on which could provide controlled movement but avoid the problems that some folks face with have a less stable grip.  Perhaps an arm to which the iron could be clamped and a post/pivot such that the iron would land in a pretty consistent spot. 
Wouldn't work under the base board but might be useful for bench work?

Just thinking out loud.

Online longbow

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Re: Useless at soldering, best connectors?
« Reply #36 on: April 01, 2020, 09:57:47 AM »
Resistance soldering does make holding things a little simpler as you can hold parts with the tip of the iron before applying the current.

Offline Nigel Cliffe

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Re: Useless at soldering, best connectors?
« Reply #37 on: April 01, 2020, 01:49:53 PM »

Question - is there a need for one of us to come up with a soldering iron add-on which could provide controlled movement but avoid the problems that some folks face with have a less stable grip.  Perhaps an arm to which the iron could be clamped and a post/pivot such that the iron would land in a pretty consistent spot. 
Wouldn't work under the base board but might be useful for bench work?


Many people are able to do something with a load of thought about arm position, iron, size of grip on iron, arm support, and holding the job down with sticks, blu-tac, prodders, etc.   

I'm a huge user of the peg+skewer clamps, made lots of them, including numerous variations.  See this article:
http://www.2mm.org.uk/mag0897/clamps.htm

My most common variant is like the one on the right in photo, but with addition of second skewer leg at 45degrees downwards, to press down on the a job on the bench. 





Resistance soldering does make holding things a little simpler as you can hold parts with the tip of the iron before applying the current.


Agreed,  Resistance soldering units are one solution.   There was an Australian design (unfortunately no longer available) which was designed for layout wiring - hooking up droppers to rails, etc..    But, any RSU would do the trick provided one understands how they work. 

There needs to be a return path with high current capacity.  Usually a very fat connector to a fat wire. 
The heat comes from the resistance in the carbon probe, near its tip the resistance is high (lots of current through small cross-section of carbon), and that gets very hot, heating things in the immediate vicinity and thus able to melt solder.   Turn off the current and the heat disappears very quickly. 

RSUs can be a big expense, so think hard before purchasing.  Check that the probe material is cheap and readily replaceable.  Some use carbon rods used by welders, those are really cheap.   


 

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