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Author Topic: Beginner troubleshooting farish class 37  (Read 401 times)

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Offline gavin_t

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Beginner troubleshooting farish class 37
« on: November 09, 2019, 08:35:02 PM »
 :helpneededsign:

Hi all complete novice here so apologies if any silly questions.
Basically having some running issues with my layout. Unfortunately I only have one locomotive so am not 100% sure if track of loco issues. However I have given the track a good clean and it is not isolated to any particular area so I am pointing at the locomotive itself....
It's a DCC farish 37 and has trouble pulling away on occasions due to the way DCC pulls away slowly/realistically it sometimes stalls before it gets going. Little touch on the roof and off she goes usually. When running with the lights on they go off when this happens so it is clearly a conduction issue.

Now since owning the locomotive  (couple of months) I have never cleaned the wheels so assume this would be a good way to start? Best method of doing this? Although they are a dark metal to start with the don't look dirty to me  :uneasy:

Only curve ball to the issue is if you run the locomotive at a moderate speed for 5 mins and then stop and start it the behaviour is much better. Strange!

 :thankyousign:
« Last Edit: November 10, 2019, 04:05:35 PM by gavin_t »

Offline daversmth

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Re: Beginner trouble shooting farish class 37
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2019, 09:13:21 PM »
I am sure there are many more on here more experienced and qualified to answer than I am but I am happy to offer my opinion. There are three places where power is transferred. One is from track to wheel as you have already mentioned. The second is from the wheel to the bogie, through sprung copper contacts touching the inside of the wheel. The third is from thd two pins that stick up at thd top of thd bogie and contact with sprung copper strips in the loco body. There could be a poor contact at any of those three places. I have found that locos, even from the factory, can be over oiled or over greased which in time gets into the contact points mentioned and can cause a problem like you are seeing. You should be able to remove the bogies, which then can be taken apart to allow access to clean the backs of the wheels. I use IPA for this ( Iso Propyl Alcohol ) as a degreaser but be careful not to get it on any loco paintwork because it will damage it.  I havd a perfect finger print on the side of one of my locos from that.

Hope that helps.

I have found nearly all my poor running issues have been resolved by cleaning as described but as a relative novice am more than happy to be contradicted if others think differently.

Offline MacRat

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Re: Beginner trouble shooting farish class 37
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2019, 10:45:01 AM »
Random off topic, but I found the OP title very confusing and worrisome at first sight.
Is it "beginner-trouble shooting class 37" or "beginner troubleshooting class 37". I feel reassured to see it's the latter.

Offline Bob G

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Re: Beginner trouble shooting farish class 37
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2019, 03:21:05 PM »
I dont have any problem with the subject title :)

Can I suggest that the loco has not even been properly run in yet. it needs a good hour each way (preferably on DC) on a circular test track at about half speed just to bed in and get rid of high spots on gears, and clear some of the crud that the factory put on the loco. This includes overspray on the current collecting parts of the wheels etc.

Secondly, running a loco from cold is bound to be a worse experience than when it has warmed up a little.

Put these two things together and I think that might be problem solved.

HTH
Bob

Offline gavin_t

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Re: Beginner trouble shooting farish class 37
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2019, 04:05:05 PM »
Thanks all. I will have one more long running session first and see how things go.
What is the preferred method of wheel cleaning? Anything I have searched online just refers to off the shelf dedicated cleaning stations. Are they worth an investment or is there an easier diy way. I thought I had some ipa but apparently not. Will go and aquire some more.

Ps title edited to avoid worrying people  :-*

Offline ntpntpntp

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Re: Beginner troubleshooting farish class 37
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2019, 04:17:12 PM »
Like so many aspects of the hobby, people have different opinions! 

I'm not a fan of "potions" to clean wheels so I avoid IPA etc.  Personally I've used the Minitrix wheel cleaner "block" for decades.  It's a pair of long and thin soft brass wire brushes mounted on a block which sits on the rails to draw power.   Also available as re-badges from Gaugemaster, Conrad and others, so shop around!

https://www.amazon.co.uk/M%C3%A4rklin-739-66623-Trix-N-Reinigungsbuerste/dp/B0000WRG6E


Some folk fear it scratches the wheels but in all the years I've used them I've never observed any effect like that. The trick is to set at about half to three-quarters speed, sit the loco's powered wheels on top and move gently forward and backward.  DO NOT PRESS HARD, and try and avoid the traction-tyred wheels (not always possible!)
Nick.   2016 celebrating the 20th anniversary of "Königshafen" exhibition layout!

Offline gavin_t

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Re: Beginner troubleshooting farish class 37
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2019, 04:52:10 PM »
Those are what I have seen online. I was worried about taking coatings off wheels etc but sounds like they are OK if used properly then.

My two don't have traction tyres so should be easy enough to use   :)

Offline Malc

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Re: Beginner troubleshooting farish class 37
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2019, 07:03:51 PM »
One cheaper way is to put some kitchen towel over a straight piece of track and holding the loco so it is half on and half off. Power the track and let the kitchen towel clean the wheels at one end. Turn the loco round and do the other end. I do use some isopropyl alcohol on the towel to help with the cleaningl
The years have been good to me, it was the weekends that did the damage.

Offline bridgiesimon

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Re: Beginner troubleshooting farish class 37
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2019, 07:22:53 PM »
One cheaper way is to put some kitchen towel over a straight piece of track and holding the loco so it is half on and half off. Power the track and let the kitchen towel clean the wheels at one end. Turn the loco round and do the other end. I do use some isopropyl alcohol on the towel to help with the cleaningl

Other than using a different cleaning solution, this is exactly what I do, I even have a small length of track on a length of wood specially for the job, ideal for wheel cleaning in the warm before a show rather than using the layout out in the log cabin.

Best wishes
Simon

Online Trainfish

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Re: Beginner troubleshooting farish class 37
« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2019, 09:26:49 PM »
Wouldn't this allow fibres from the kitchen towel to go into the motor?  :goggleeyes:
John

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Offline njee20

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Re: Beginner troubleshooting farish class 37
« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2019, 10:26:48 PM »
I’ve got a couple of locos that do that - move about 1mm and then stop. Repeat until I prod them to get them going. Worse when cold. Annoyingly two of them are sound ones, so they go through start up cycles again if you’re not quick to prod.

Have never quite worked out the cause, not exclusively dirty wheels, but certainly won’t help.

Offline gavin_t

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Re: Beginner troubleshooting farish class 37
« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2019, 10:27:28 PM »
Wouldn't this allow fibres from the kitchen towel to go into the motor?  :goggleeyes:

That would be my thoughts also. Something like a "Jay cloth" be better?

Offline gavin_t

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Re: Beginner troubleshooting farish class 37
« Reply #12 on: November 10, 2019, 10:28:32 PM »
I’ve got a couple of locos that do that - move about 1mm and then stop. Repeat until I prod them to get them going. Worse when cold. Annoyingly two of them are sound ones, so they go through start up cycles again if you’re not quick to prod.

Have never quite worked out the cause, not exclusively dirty wheels, but certainly won’t help.

Exactly what I have here!

Offline ntpntpntp

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Re: Beginner troubleshooting farish class 37
« Reply #13 on: November 10, 2019, 10:42:11 PM »
I suppose the commercial equivalent of the kitchen-roll-on-track  method  are devices like the Woodland Scenics Tidy Track and similar

https://www.amazon.com/WOODLAND-SCENICS-TT4560-Cleaner-WOOU4560/dp/B0062VH6RQ


https://www.hattons.co.uk/47136/gaugemaster_gm50_locomotive_wheel_cleaner/stockdetail.aspx?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIg8XjiNvg5QIVDcjeCh1yFwUQEAQYCCABEgJhuPD_BwE


I have one sold by TGW which is identical to the Gaugemaster one above (and I'm sure there are other clones / rebadges). To be honest I've not really tried it much as I'm perfectly happy with the good old Minitrix block as I posted earlier.
Nick.   2016 celebrating the 20th anniversary of "Königshafen" exhibition layout!

Offline Graham

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Re: Beginner troubleshooting farish class 37
« Reply #14 on: November 11, 2019, 03:39:56 AM »
I have the same problem with a number of Farish loco's. I clean the track, service the loco's to make sure they are spotlessly clean and still I get the stall happening. On the Dapol's I can creep really easily.

Starting to think I need to put "stay alives" in to see if that helps, also starting to read up on the acceleration curves to see if that will help.

Any pointers from the DCC experts in the group would be much appreciated.

 

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