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Author Topic: The Coniston Railway  (Read 12957 times)

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Offline chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #495 on: May 19, 2020, 06:51:10 AM »
The other issue is I guess like the gates those signals have mechanisms underneath which are in itself fragile and need minimal handling and care.

They do but they are pretty well protected, hanging less far down below the baseboard than the framing.
They are basically a bent wire coming down from the signal which slots through a loop on the end of a solenoid. The solenoid is fixed to a short length of wood glued to the underside of the baseboard.
When the solenoid is activated it moves up, pushing the wire and, hence, the spectacle plate of the signal arm up. The solenoids have spring returns so they drop and return the signal to danger when switched off.

In some cases, I haven't been able to get the travel adjusted correctly to prevent overtravel of the signal arm - because the link to the solenoid is loose, not a rigid fit - so I've had to put end stops in. If possible I do that under the baseboard but if that's not possible, especially for returning to danger, I have to resort to a thin wire above the arm and fixed to the post. I had to do that for both of Woodland's but on Broughton I had the wheeze of extending the relevant upright of the ladder and bending it over to serve the same purpose. It's not perfect but it works and is only visible if looking closely.


« Last Edit: May 19, 2020, 07:04:53 AM by chrism »

Offline swisstrains

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #496 on: May 19, 2020, 08:51:54 AM »
................................

Is there a reason for the signal at Woodland being reversed?

Reversed?


Isn't the red face of the arm pointing to the right instead of the left?

Ah, gotcha.
Practicality I'm afraid. The Up signal post is very close to the board edge so I didn't want the arm being even closer, especially as I wanted it to move which makes it more fragile than if it were fixed.


I appreciate your concerns but considering your obvious attention to detail it seems an unusual compromise to make. If you are happy with it then that is the main thing.
John

Offline chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #497 on: May 22, 2020, 08:24:02 PM »
The first fit testing of the print for Five Arches Viaduct.
Not many changes required. The parapet wall needs raising - although I made it according to the proportions in the photo it looks too low to me, only a scale foot or so above rail level. I also need to extend the ends of the print to provide the retaining walls between the end arches and the embankments either end.



The leftmost arch will be less than half its present height, with a minor road passing underneath and the second from the left will be even shorter with a rough ground slope coming down through it. The remaining three are anybody's guess until I have an opportunity to go and look at the site to try and get a feel for what it would have been like.

The baseboard is made, along with linking boards to fit it to the ends of Woodland and Broughton. The linking boards are hinged to their respective layouts and the viaduct board bolted securely to the Woodland link board so the whole lot can be folded down out of the way when required.
For use other than at home I will make different linking boards for connecting it between the two stations all in a straight line.




The trackbed is fixed in place on timber piers, which will ultimately be clad with the prints for the finished piers, and the track has been temporarily pinned down to test the fit. The next task is to get the track power connected, on the viaduct board and the two linking boards,so that it can be tested properly before securing the track permanently and complete the railway by providing me with a connection between Woodland and Broughton, thereby allowing me to run trains from Coniston right through to Broughton - except when I take the viaduct board down to work on the scenic aspect of it.



« Last Edit: May 22, 2020, 08:25:42 PM by chrism »

Offline crewearpley40

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #498 on: May 22, 2020, 08:36:01 PM »
Impressive. Guess work on 5 arches ? Have you reference material to work from  ?

Offline chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #499 on: May 22, 2020, 08:40:38 PM »
Impressive. Guess work on 5 arches ? Have you reference material to work from  ?

At present just one photo and the 1912 edition 25 inch OS map. That's why I need to get across to the location to see the current terrain and attempt to work out what it was like, if much different, when the viaduct was still there.

Offline Train Waiting

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #500 on: May 22, 2020, 09:28:47 PM »
That looks good, Chris.

I think at least some of the 'low parapet effect' will be due to our model railway track being rather higher than the real thing.

Best wishes.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1930s to the 1950s.

For the made-up background to the railway and list of characters, please see here: https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=38281.msg607991#msg607991

Offline chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #501 on: May 22, 2020, 09:37:16 PM »
That looks good, Chris.

Cheers, John.

Quote
I think at least some of the 'low parapet effect' will be due to our model railway track being rather higher than the real thing.

I think you're right - it may also be that I've got the trackbed a little high and/or a little thick, but if it were any lower it would encroach into the arches. It's no problem to tweak the photoshop images before I print the final versions for attaching - and not with drawing pins  ;)

« Last Edit: Yesterday at 06:31:11 AM by chrism »

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #502 on: May 22, 2020, 09:54:17 PM »
From your previous work I'd say it's going to be a great feature and a prime site for pics/vids ;)

Offline chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #503 on: Yesterday at 06:31:56 AM »
From your previous work I'd say it's going to be a great feature and a prime site for pics/vids ;)

Thanks, Mick. I'll do my best.

Online degsy_safc

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #504 on: Yesterday at 08:20:16 AM »
Hi Chris,

That looks great and Iím sure the finished item with all the scenics below is going to be a stunning addition.

Just out of interest you mentioned itís a print from a photograph & you edited it in photoshop. How did you work out the scaling ratio for reducing the photo to keep the aspect the correct size etc?

Cheers Derek
Cheers Derek

Offline chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #505 on: Yesterday at 08:51:46 AM »
That looks great and Iím sure the finished item with all the scenics below is going to be a stunning addition.

Cheers, Derek.

Quote
Just out of interest you mentioned itís a print from a photograph & you edited it in photoshop. How did you work out the scaling ratio for reducing the photo to keep the aspect the correct size etc?

No, this one isn't a print from a photograph - the only photo available is a poor quality (or poorly reproduced) monochrome one from when the viaduct still existed, so I've had to design it myself, with a little guesstimation.

I know, from a book, the span of the arches and I know the overall length, width and curvature from the 1912 edition OS 25 inch map. I also know the approximate heights of the viaduct, surviving embankment and the terrain around from more modern OS maps. From those I worked out the dimensions to use and scaled them at 2mm/ft for the outline.

I have had to cheat with the curvature of the embankment at the right-hand end because I wanted the cross-board join tracks to be at 90 degrees to the board edges and also because they needed to join up with Woodland and Broughton, via the link boards at each end. I'm also looking ahead to when I make the alternative link boards for setting all three up in a straight line as opposed to fitting around a corner of the room. This means that, instead of continuing the curve of the viaduct, the embankment has to curve the other way but from a practicality point of view needs must.

For the stonework, I've overlaid my usual slate stonework image - from a photograph of a surviving wall at Coniston. I've enlarged it to give larger stones for the structural stonework but not for the parapet wall.

The arch stones have come from my old faithful arch stones, a photograph of those on the surviving bridge at the southern end of Coniston, which I've used in all sorts of places where I needed a stone curve - that bridge itself, various doorways on Coniston's station building and loco shed, Torver's overbridge and  goods shed and, rather craftily laid flat and replicated to make a full circle for Coniston's turntable pit surround.

For the viaduct, I adjusted them for the required arch radius and scaled them so that they look about right compared to the sole photo of the viaduct. I've also straightened them to use for the front edge of the underside for the arches so I can give the appearance of the faces and undersides of the same stones since I anticipate taking more pics from a low angle so the underside of the arches will be visible.

It's not going to be 100% perfect due to all this guesstimation but it will give the right impression, which is my aim.



Online degsy_safc

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #506 on: Yesterday at 11:47:02 AM »
That looks great and Iím sure the finished item with all the scenics below is going to be a stunning addition.

Cheers, Derek.

Quote
Just out of interest you mentioned itís a print from a photograph & you edited it in photoshop. How did you work out the scaling ratio for reducing the photo to keep the aspect the correct size etc?

No, this one isn't a print from a photograph - the only photo available is a poor quality (or poorly reproduced) monochrome one from when the viaduct still existed, so I've had to design it myself, with a little guesstimation.

I know, from a book, the span of the arches and I know the overall length, width and curvature from the 1912 edition OS 25 inch map. I also know the approximate heights of the viaduct, surviving embankment and the terrain around from more modern OS maps. From those I worked out the dimensions to use and scaled them at 2mm/ft for the outline.

I have had to cheat with the curvature of the embankment at the right-hand end because I wanted the cross-board join tracks to be at 90 degrees to the board edges and also because they needed to join up with Woodland and Broughton, via the link boards at each end. I'm also looking ahead to when I make the alternative link boards for setting all three up in a straight line as opposed to fitting around a corner of the room. This means that, instead of continuing the curve of the viaduct, the embankment has to curve the other way but from a practicality point of view needs must.

For the stonework, I've overlaid my usual slate stonework image - from a photograph of a surviving wall at Coniston. I've enlarged it to give larger stones for the structural stonework but not for the parapet wall.

The arch stones have come from my old faithful arch stones, a photograph of those on the surviving bridge at the southern end of Coniston, which I've used in all sorts of places where I needed a stone curve - that bridge itself, various doorways on Coniston's station building and loco shed, Torver's overbridge and  goods shed and, rather craftily laid flat and replicated to make a full circle for Coniston's turntable pit surround.

For the viaduct, I adjusted them for the required arch radius and scaled them so that they look about right compared to the sole photo of the viaduct. I've also straightened them to use for the front edge of the underside for the arches so I can give the appearance of the faces and undersides of the same stones since I anticipate taking more pics from a low angle so the underside of the arches will be visible.

It's not going to be 100% perfect due to all this guesstimation but it will give the right impression, which is my aim.

Hi Chris,

Wow, what can I say, that is a lot of work youíve put in to get to the point of printing the images. Now youíve explained how you had the original dimensions it all makes sense how youíve scaled it down to fit NGauge, & having the old OS map gives you the aerial view for the curves, Itís all really clever how it comes together.

As Iíve never done any of this before itís all a learning curve for me and pretty steep at that lol, but all of these hints and tips are really great - when you think about it after itís been explained itís pretty obvious really, but without prior knowledge of how you would go about such a task, itís like staring into an abyss  :o

Thanks again

Cheers Derek
Cheers Derek

Offline crewearpley40

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #507 on: Yesterday at 11:49:14 AM »
One day 5 arches will be the next destination
 A field visit

Offline chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #508 on: Yesterday at 01:48:01 PM »
Here you  are, Chris  :D



The first trains (OK, not the initial test ones) to travel between Woodland and Broughton.

This means that;
a) I can now run trains between Coniston and Broughton,
b) I'd better go have a look at the site pretty soon, and
c) I've got to buy some more scenery materials.




Offline crewearpley40

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #509 on: Yesterday at 03:30:09 PM »
Chris. Impressive looking good. Hope you can achieve that site visit

 

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