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Author Topic: The Coniston Railway  (Read 3890 times)

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Online chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #165 on: November 25, 2019, 05:23:33 PM »
I googled  it. Five arches viaduct coniston photos. Excellent shot at TrainSimDev.comư

That's either a painting or a computer generated image - and it looks nothing like the original unfortunately. The location looks close but the house is wrong and the viaduct itself even more wrong. It shows the arches curving smoothly into the piers, whereas they should join at an angle. It also shows the arches much too flat.

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #166 on: November 25, 2019, 05:29:53 PM »
Ah okay. Be interesting to find  photos to aid resources, somethibg that interests me in my modelling

Online chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #167 on: November 26, 2019, 06:46:14 AM »
Ah okay. Be interesting to find  photos to aid resources,

It certainly would, a problem I've found generally with this project. The only place with lots of photos is Coniston - presumably because it was a) the terminus and after which the line was named, b) a more interesting place generally, and c) the superb architecture of the train shed.

All the other stations are somewhat devoid of many photos, no more than a handful of each that I've found thus far and, as I said, only one of the viaduct. Therefore, all I can do is the best I can with what I have found - which should be acceptable considering that I have had to make tweaks to all the other stations to fit them onto the room I have available. Torver has been shortened a fair bit, Woodland likewise with a little accentuation of the general curve as well, and Broughton will also be shortened and curved a bit more than it really was.

So long as they give a decent impression of what they were like, I'll be happy with that.

We've had to do the same at the club - Haverthwaite is close to scale size, Lakeside will be close to scale length but more curved than the original and Greenodd will have to be quite significantly shortened to fit it into a practical length.

Online crewearpley40

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #168 on: November 26, 2019, 06:51:50 AM »
Thanks chris. Something i have had to bear in mind planning my layout , compromise. Look forward to the next instalment. Be interesting how you manage five arches

Online chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #169 on: November 26, 2019, 07:27:43 AM »
Be interesting how you manage five arches

It'll probably have to be an element of guesswork based on the only photo I've found, which is a similar view to that image you found.

However, there's Woodland to finish first and then I'll be changing emphasis to operation as opposed to building. Before the next Club open day, I need to get all three current layouts able to be set up so that they can be run together in the correct geographic order - and operated from the rear. I can fit any two of them in line in my long lounge downstairs so I'll move them down two at a time and;

1) sort the linking boards,

2) check that everything works on Coniston with the control panel at the back - I split the wiring to give connecting sockets front and rear but haven't used the rear ones recently "in anger" so need to be sure that they do all work properly. For the other layouts I put single connectors in the middle so the same cables will reach to either front or rear.

3) assess the practicalities of operation from the rear. On Coniston at least I know that I won't be able to see all the track from the back. Even without a backscene in place the coal siding will be hidden by the cliff above and with the backscene fitted pretty well everything will be hidden from view, so the thinking is to rig up a lightweight mirror above the layout so that the view from the rear is looking directly down onto the tracks, which will be very handy for spotting the uncoupler locations too. The mirror frame would be fronted with nameboard & information panels and could also include some lighting.
Whether or not I'll need similar for the other stations remains to be seen.

4) Get the uncoupling sorted properly - location identifiers for and optimum polarity of the uncouplers, optimum number of magnets on the couplings for all stock that will have them, fitting magnets to the stock that doesn't currently have them, etc., etc.

5) Work out an operation sequence of what runs where and when - and whether or not I'd need to train up an assistant operator or two so that we could have things happening in all three stations at once. We could, for example, have a train arriving at Woodland whilst, at the same time, one is either passing through or doing some shunting at Torver and some shunting or, at least, running around goes on at Coniston. Could be fun  ;)

That little lot will likely keep me occupied for some time so Broughton will have to wait, along with Five Arches - because that would be the link board between Broughton and Woodland.



Online chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #170 on: December 03, 2019, 09:08:37 AM »
Woodland has started to gain foliage - and a proper level crossing!

Lady Lyons has decided to take her new Jaguar SS for a spin around The Lakes, but has been held up at Woodland whilst a 4F clanks past with a mixed freight to Coniston. The postman has just dropped off a consignment at Woodland Post Office (which is in the end of the yet to be built station building) and pauses to watch the train go past.




The freight train having cleared the crossing, the gates have been opened and Her Ladyship can continue her journey, over the crossing to follow the postman up the hill to the main Broughton-Coniston road.




Later, the coal man has come down the hill but has also been held up while the branch local train to Foxfield departs.




Now, a general view of the station looking south along the tracks....




and one looking from more of an angle....




with another looking at the crossing and goods wharf, which is now complete with the cattle pen and whatever the timber-built shed on the wharf was used for.
The yard area has still to be surfaced, when my new supplies arrive. It'll be either a rough earth surface or slate chippings depending which I decide to use. The chippings will definitely be used for between the end of the down (far) platform and the crossing, and for the path from the crossing to the end of the up platform.

The backscene will probably be familiar to those who followed the build of Coniston because it's the same one I used before having the opportunity to take some photos to make the proper one for Coniston. It may well end up being the finished backscene for Woodland because all that can be seen looking from the east across the station is trees, there aren't any high fells visible because we're further south now and left the high fells once we got through Torver.




Now, because I'm particularly pleased with it, another view of the level crossing. The gates are as close as I can get them to matching the prototype, complete with a different number of vertical bars below the diagonal brace on each gate as shown in photos of the real ones.
I designed the gates in Photoshop and printed them out onto 160gsm card before cutting them out veeeery slowly and carefully. I then added thin strips of the same card to each side to thicken the end posts, top rail and diagonal brace before glueing the whole lot to a length of square tube which slips over the square drive shaft from the motor below the baseboard.




And, finally, another view of the partially lifted siding, now with some ground foliage, and, next to the 4F, my simulated catch point - because I previously said I'd try to remember to include it in the next photo update. As I said before, it doesn't line up with the lifted siding but my excuse is that they shifted the point when they took the siding out of use so that any runaways from the yard wouldn't get deflected into the down starter signal post which will be a short distance behind the catch point.






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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #171 on: December 03, 2019, 09:16:40 AM »
Simply stunning realistic chris. Level crossing looks good chris

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #172 on: December 03, 2019, 10:41:18 AM »
That's absolutely excellent, Chris.  I drove up that road earlier this year.  Sadly, I was not held up by a '4F' on a freight or a '3F' on the branch passenger.  And my motor-car is not quite as spiffing as that of Her Ladyship!

Great stuff; thank you.

Best wishes.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

Online chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #173 on: December 03, 2019, 11:07:08 AM »
Thanks guys.

That's absolutely excellent, Chris.  I drove up that road earlier this year.  Sadly, I was not held up by a '4F' on a freight or a '3F' on the branch passenger. 

Or, even an Ivatt 2MT "Mickey Mouse" tank on the branch passenger ;)

Quote
And my motor-car is not quite as spiffing as that of Her Ladyship!

You mean that you weren't the photographer in the 2nd pic in this post?
https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=38281.msg603992#msg603992
 ;)

I thought I'd spotted an SS on Poppingham, so I had to check.

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #174 on: December 03, 2019, 11:26:04 AM »
My, that has developed at an alarming (albeit wonderful) rate! :goggleeyes:

Brilliant work. You are Robby Rocket Pants!

The rate with which you are modelling bits of the former LMS is astonishing. I look forward to your rendering of St. Pancras.

Seriously though, the whole idea of building stations as separate modular layouts which can be connected to show a decent length of branchline is dashed clever. The level crossing and tree-lined cutting beyond is, to me, really picturesque. You are doing a fantastic job here.  :thumbsup:
Some situations in life are like dairy cows. When you see 'em you just gotta milk 'em.

Online crewearpley40

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #175 on: December 03, 2019, 11:36:33 AM »
Chris and chris p thought  coniston was built by the furness rlwy absorbed into the lnwr later lms whereas chris p , st pancras was part of the midland. . Woodland level crossing , is that the one with the working gates described in previous posts chris ? Chris

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #176 on: December 03, 2019, 11:38:58 AM »
Chris and chris p thought  coniston was built by the furness rlwy absorbed into the lnwr later lms whereas chris p , st pancras was part of the midland. . Woodland level crossing , is that the one with the working gates described in previous posts chris ? Chris

Indeed, you are right.
Some situations in life are like dairy cows. When you see 'em you just gotta milk 'em.

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #177 on: December 03, 2019, 12:13:28 PM »
I like your dry stone walls, Chris.  How did you make them?
With kind regards
Laurence
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Hessle: www.hessle.org.uk

Online chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #178 on: December 03, 2019, 12:15:07 PM »
My, that has developed at an alarming (albeit wonderful) rate! :goggleeyes:
Brilliant work. You are Robby Rocket Pants!

It really doesn't take much time to plonk some clump foliage down and plant a few trees (especially using superglue to hold 'em in place rather than PVA) so the rate of progress can easily be rapid once the groundwork is done. The only part of that which took extra time was selecting trees that would hide the curve around to the back and deciding whether they could be fixed or needed to have tubes inserted to allow them to be removed - else the baseboard wouldn't fit in the transport cases. Eight of the trees are removable at this end, whilst the tallest ones at the back are on a hinged section of the scenery so they can be folded down for transport.

The level crossing has taken rather longer. Most of the weekend was taken up just making the gates, for example, since they required some fiddly cutting out - one slip of the scalpel and it's move on to the second (or third) copy that I printed out.

Quote
The rate with which you are modelling bits of the former LMS is astonishing. I look forward to your rendering of St. Pancras.

I'll give that one a miss, thanks. I'm not even doing Foxfield because I don't have room - with careful positioning and accepting the wrong geographic order, the most I can fit in is Coniston down to Broughton, via Torver and Woodland.
Anyway, I reckon I can safely give St. Pancras a miss since my family had a hand in part of the real one - an ancestor of mine, Sir George Gilbert Scott senior, designed the Midland Grand Hotel  ;)

There's also a slightly tenuous family  link to Coniston too - the station and train shed was designed by Paley & Austin of Lancaster, Herbert Austin trained with Sir George before joining Edmund Paley as a partner.

Quote
Seriously though, the whole idea of building stations as separate modular layouts which can be connected to show a decent length of branchline is dashed clever.

Thanks. I'm sure I'm not the first to think of it though.
My plan/hope is that I'll get it all sorted so that they can be set up and run as individual layouts or groups of two, three or all four depending on space available. I'm also considering doing one link board as a very simple track layout (one track, no points, etc.) but high on scenic content - namely, Five Arches viaduct between Broughton and Woodland.

Quote
The level crossing and tree-lined cutting beyond is, to me, really picturesque. You are doing a fantastic job here.  :thumbsup:

Thanks, mate. It's worked out better than I'd anticipated. All I really aimed to do was to hide the track disappearing around the back, as well as hiding the road dropping off a precipice at the back of the built-up scenery - but it has come out quite nicely as a scene in its own right.

Working on the other end now, hopefully it'll work as well as the first.

Online chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #179 on: December 03, 2019, 12:22:38 PM »
Chris and chris p thought  coniston was built by the furness rlwy absorbed into the lnwr later lms

Not quite - it was built and briefly operated by The Coniston Railway Co., before being taken over by the Furness Railway. The takeover was almost inevitable, since most of the CR directors were also FR directors and most of the money to build the line came from shareholders of both railways.

The LNWR never got its hands on the FR, which survived as an independent company until the Grouping of 1923, when it was absorbed into the LMS.


Quote
Woodland level crossing , is that the one with the working gates described in previous posts chris ? Chris

It certainly is - and working very nicely too.

 

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