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Author Topic: Averingcliffe  (Read 257 times)

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Offline dannyboy

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Averingcliffe
« on: January 07, 2019, 07:56:17 PM »
I have mentioned in a few posts my layout 'Averingcliffe', so I thought it was about time I gave some information.

The layout is approximately 12 feet in length by 2' 6", with the last 2 feet at either end extending to 4 feet. Basically there are two loops and each of the 4 feet pieces at the ends will have a length of track that goes....er....nowhere really. Actually, the one at the left goes to a little seaside halt, whilst the one at the right goes to a harbour, but I have that side set up so I can attach cassettes.  Inside the two loops to the front, there will be lines to a station with two, (three?), platforms, a head shunt to the left and a line to a turntable and workshops etc to the right. To the rear, there will be a line from the inner loop which will feed a 'Royal Mail' depot and a dairy. Before you all ask, no there is no track plan, although this was what I originally envisaged.



Things have changed a lot since then! That is one big advantage of using Kato Unitrack - I have changed the layout quite a bit since the plan was first formed about 2 years ago.  :o. One of the biggest changes is that there are no tunnels in the corners. There is a large mountain at the rear, just over 4 feet in length, which rises between 2 roads, with two single track tunnels. Travelling clockwise, both loops rise and the outer loop stays at that level through the mountain, whilst the inner loop drops to road level when it exits from the mountain. Talking of roads, they have been changed a lot as well!

What I intend doing is showing my layout 'in bits', together with a bit of history of the area, which is set 'somewhere in England', in an indeterminate, (Rule 1), era.  :-\

The first bit is as follows, ( with some poetic licence) -

This is a photograph of the original dairy on my layout ‘Averingcliffe’. The photo’ was taken in 1909, a few years after the dairy was opened by the two brothers Daniel and Edward Wakefield, in 1903. As you can see, the building is in need of some repairs, including the re-covering of the roof. The brothers were just about managing to run the dairy, with milk being brought in by horse and cart from local farmers and by rail from some of the outlying stations – many of which were nothing more than little halts on the line. Cheese and butter were the mainstays of production. However, within five years, things were to change big time.



Prior to the outbreak of WW1, Daniel and Edward met two sisters who had come to the UK at the turn of the century as teenagers. The sisters, Maria and Sofia were from Italy and met the two brothers at the home of a mutual friend.  Maria and Sofia had worked on the family farm near Naples, so had some knowledge of the dairy industry, although Maria had more business acumen than Sofia, who was always ‘hands on’ on the farm. Daniel married Maria in 1912, whilst Edward married Sofia a year later.

Because of the First World War, there was a huge increase in the demand for condensed milk which increased the Wakefield Dairies cash input enormously.  In 1915, the British Government started issuing condensed milk to troops as part of their emergency rations. This further helped to increase revenue at Wakefield Dairies, with the Government awarding a lucrative contract. Due to the Government contract, the workforce was increased with some workers being brought in by train to a nearby small station, with the Wakefield’s paying for a tunnel to be constructed, connecting the station to the dairy. The Wakefield’s had to fight off a strong challenge from the American company Nestlé, who tried to buy them out, having acquired numerous companies and who also had a supply agreement with companies in Australia.

Due to the profits made by the Wakefield Dairy, plans were drawn up for a new dairy and production facility to be built a short distance away. Work started on the new buildings in 1919.


I will release part 2 of the 'Wakefield Dairies' story shortly, when the electrician has done some more work, (I am awaiting some fibre optic cable!). Thank you to those who have read to the end.  :thumbsup:
David.
I used to be indecisive - now I'm not - I don't think.
If a friend seems distant, catch up with him.

Offline port perran

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2019, 08:02:20 PM »
I really like the story and the building. The rickety roof is really good.
So......is the layout finished or is it still under construction?
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline dannyboy

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2019, 08:07:07 PM »
I really like the story and the building. The rickety roof is really good.
So......is the layout finished or is it still under construction?

Thank you for those comments.  :thumbsup:
Q: "is the layout finished or is it still under construction?"
A: Why do you think you are getting the story in bits?  :smiley-laughing: :no:. Now that I am retired, hopefully the progress will be, (a bit), quicker than it has been these last two years.
David.
I used to be indecisive - now I'm not - I don't think.
If a friend seems distant, catch up with him.

Offline Train Waiting

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2019, 09:22:07 PM »
Very interesting story and a good picture.

Many thanks.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)


The Table-Top Railway is a train set trying and failing to be a model railway.

I believe that train sets and model railways are fun.

Offline cornish yorkie

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2019, 10:45:08 PM »
 :hellosign: Really like the story, love the old dairy building & looking forward to your next update
    regards Derek

Offline dannyboy

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2019, 03:15:29 PM »

Part II
The new dairy buildings were completed in 1923. The two following photographs were taken a couple of weeks before the official opening, which occurred on 30th June. The weather was fine and dry, with temperatures reaching 73° Fahrenheit according to the local newspaper report. Numerous dignitaries from the county attended, along with the workers, who were given a days wage. Many people from the surrounding villages were invited and travelled in charabancs provided by Daniel and Edward. The new buildings were officially opened by the Lord Lieutenant of the county Sir Theodore Saurus, known to his friends as ‘Theo’. Sir Theodore was a man of many words; in fact, it took him nearly half an hour to officially declare the buildings open! Unfortunately, no photographs of the official opening survive due to bomb damage during World War II, (more details to follow in a later episode).

The new buildings were much larger than was required for the current workload and work force, but the Wakefield’s rationale was that this course of action would allow them to expand the business at a later date, without incurring too much expense. This was to prove an astute move, as later events will show. The loading bay on the side of the building facing the old dairy building, was used for loading horse drawn carts with produce and, increasingly, by the relatively new motorised vehicles. Daniel and Edward decided that it would be more prudent to run a second private siding, between the original siding and the loading bay, to facilitate extra movements. This was finally built in 1929 and as no service was provided by any railway company, they were informed by their lawyers that the provisions of the Railway Act 1921 did not apply.

Edward and Sofia had a son, Robert, exactly nine months to the day after their wedding, which did cause a few raised eyebrows, although Robert was a true ‘honeymoon baby’. Daniel and Maria’s first child, also a son, who they called John, was born three months later. This pleased both sets of parents, as it meant the cousins could grow up together. Daniel and Maria had another child, a daughter, Mary in 1917, whilst Edward and Sofia had a daughter, Margaret, in 1920. It was a real family occasion at the official opening, although the children were in the care of their respective Nanny’s while the parents mingled with the visitors.


The two surviving photographs -







David.
I used to be indecisive - now I'm not - I don't think.
If a friend seems distant, catch up with him.

Offline port perran

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2019, 07:11:21 PM »
Great photographs - being B&W really creates the period feel.
And I love the back story which helps to build a believable picture.
Keep up the good work.
Thanks
Martin


If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline cornish yorkie

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2019, 12:18:23 AM »
Hi by by
Great photographs - being B&W really creates the period feel.
And I love the back story which helps to build a believable picture.
Keep up the good work.
Thanks
Martin




:hellosign: Totally seconded   :thumbsup:

 

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