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Author Topic: Oxcott [Thames valley 1989/Network SouthEast]  (Read 7777 times)

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Offline Tank

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Re: Oxcott [Thames valley 1989/Network SouthEast]
« Reply #30 on: January 31, 2019, 08:43:19 AM »
Great looking collection.  Similar to mine!  :thumbsup:

Online njee20

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Re: Oxcott [Thames valley 1989/Network SouthEast]
« Reply #31 on: January 31, 2019, 09:39:31 AM »
That's a neat storage solution. I can never decide what to do with mine and just use the original boxes, which actually means that I just put stock on the layout until it was full, and then basically everything bought since is still in its box totally unused because putting everything back in the original boxes is a massive PITA. 7.50 per insert though, I'm not sure I can make myself spend a couple of hundred quid on foam!

Offline jamespetts

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Re: Oxcott [Thames valley 1989/Network SouthEast]
« Reply #32 on: January 31, 2019, 10:47:12 AM »
Great looking collection.  Similar to mine!  :thumbsup:

In which case, you have excellent taste in models.

That's a neat storage solution. I can never decide what to do with mine and just use the original boxes, which actually means that I just put stock on the layout until it was full, and then basically everything bought since is still in its box totally unused because putting everything back in the original boxes is a massive PITA. 7.50 per insert though, I'm not sure I can make myself spend a couple of hundred quid on foam!

I do recommend these boxes - it makes storage so much easier than the manufacturers' boxes. The amount of time and effort required to put things in and take things out of the manufacturers' boxes is huge.

As to the foam, you are not paying for the materials so much as the labour of cutting and sticking it. You could probably make your own with some foam slabs, a saw and some glue.

Online njee20

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Re: Oxcott [Thames valley 1989/Network SouthEast]
« Reply #33 on: January 31, 2019, 02:34:12 PM »
Yep, which is why I never bother, and have entire rakes of wagons that have never come out of the boxes!

Where did you get the trolley from, my Google fu is weak today? You may tempt me yet! Wasn't particualrly disputing the value in the foam, the JB Storage ones are cheaper, but only 8 slots, although they do also do smaller ones for 4-wheeled wagons etc.

Offline jamespetts

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Re: Oxcott [Thames valley 1989/Network SouthEast]
« Reply #34 on: January 31, 2019, 02:54:11 PM »
Yep, which is why I never bother, and have entire rakes of wagons that have never come out of the boxes!

Where did you get the trolley from, my Google fu is weak today? You may tempt me yet! Wasn't particualrly disputing the value in the foam, the JB Storage ones are cheaper, but only 8 slots, although they do also do smaller ones for 4-wheeled wagons etc.

It is not actually an independent trolley: it is the Really Useful Boxes stacking system with castors. One can order it on the Really Useful Boxes website, as I did.

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Re: Oxcott [Thames valley 1989/Network SouthEast]
« Reply #35 on: January 31, 2019, 02:59:39 PM »
I use JB Models, and I always buy the larger foam trays that allow two carriages side by side.  I also have the larger Really Useful Boxes (50L?) to put them in.

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Re: Oxcott [Thames valley 1989/Network SouthEast]
« Reply #36 on: March 03, 2019, 01:15:26 PM »
Here is the Inter-City Executive HST on the Model Railway Club's test tracks:

Dapol HST by James Petts, on Flickr

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Re: Oxcott [Thames valley 1989/Network SouthEast]
« Reply #37 on: April 08, 2019, 10:16:39 PM »
The people building my baseboards tell me that they should be ready to install them on the 23rd of this month.

In readiness for this, I have been reviewing the track plan and trying to work out where the track occupancy sections should be for the purposes of reliable automation. This is what I have come up with:



You will have to right click and select "view image" to see this clearly. The purple lines are the occupancy section breaks. Assume that all turnouts are isolated on both rails on all roads so that all turnouts are effectively in their own occupancy section.

If anyone who has any experience of automation can spot any flaws with this design, I should be most grateful.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2019, 10:18:12 PM by jamespetts, Reason: More information about the image »

Offline jamespetts

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Re: Oxcott [Thames valley 1989/Network SouthEast]
« Reply #38 on: April 24, 2019, 08:46:04 PM »
The baseboards for this (which I had professionally built and installed) went in yesterday. This is what they look like:

Shed by James Petts, on Flickr

Shed by James Petts, on Flickr

Shed by James Petts, on Flickr

Shed by James Petts, on Flickr

The bracket on the wall above these baseboards show the height of the other, 00 gauge, layout that I also plan to build in the shed (with the same baseboard suppliers).

The baseboard builders recommended, sensibly I think, laying at least the fiddle yard tracks for this layout before installing the boards for the 00 gauge layout otherwise it would be very difficult to reach all the way to the back for long periods of time.

This is potentially complex, as the code 40 flatbottom turnouts that I need for the scenic section have not yet been released by British Finescale (although at least the plain track is available now). This involves either:

(1) building the fiddle yards (which are to use Peco track) now and leaving the scenic section until later (possibly after work on the 00 gauge layout has started);
(2) attempting to find a way to build these N gauge flatbottom turnouts in code 40 myself (perhaps using 2FS equipment?) - I am sceptical of my ability to do this, however;
(3) seeing if I can get the flatbottom turnouts built for me by Keith Armes or similar; or
(4) using the existing Finetrax bullhead turnouts instead of flat bottom turnouts on the main line (but using the concrete sleeper flatbottom plain track for the main lines).

I am not sure which of those is preferable at present - either (1) or (3) seem the most appealing, and I am leaning towards (1).

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Re: Oxcott [Thames valley 1989/Network SouthEast]
« Reply #39 on: April 24, 2019, 09:14:28 PM »
like the photos of the office james,superb well constructed boards and a light airy office. chris

Online Newportnobby

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Re: Oxcott [Thames valley 1989/Network SouthEast]
« Reply #40 on: April 24, 2019, 09:28:06 PM »
a light airy office

A light airy office?! I've been operated on in hospital theatres not as clean :goggleeyes: :no:
Good luck with the build, James.

Online crewearpley40

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Re: Oxcott [Thames valley 1989/Network SouthEast]
« Reply #41 on: April 24, 2019, 09:31:47 PM »
thats what it looked like to me mick / james

Offline jamespetts

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Re: Oxcott [Thames valley 1989/Network SouthEast]
« Reply #42 on: April 24, 2019, 09:34:41 PM »
thats what it looked like to me mick / james

It is, I suppose, a sort of operating theatre for model railway equipment. I regularly perform surgery on locomotives and carriages, and my trusty scalpel is most useful for cutting transfers from their backing paper for renumbering operations.

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Re: Oxcott [Thames valley 1989/Network SouthEast]
« Reply #43 on: May 03, 2019, 01:48:01 AM »
Some further progress: a large quantity of Peco track for the fiddle yard arrived this afternoon, although I am still short of a number of necessary turnouts and most of my cork has not been delivered yet, so I cannot commence track laying work. I am still hoping that British Finescale will release the flat bottom turnouts sometime soon so that I can start work on the scenic section before too long, but may have to consider alternatives if this transpires not to happen any time soon.

I experimented with removing the PCB from a Farish class 47 and hardwiring a Zimo MX622 decoder, the aim being to fit more stay alive capacity. Although I was able to get the class 47 to work with a hard-wired decoder (after hours of trying to work out how to wire the LEDs), the large number of resistors needed and the mass of wires made the shell still unable to fit on the chassis with a stay alive fitted; moreover, I managed to destroy the decoder by accidentally bridging the gap between the solder pad for the ground and a programming pad when fitting the stay alive. I have posted about this in more detail on the MERG forum.

However, a more successful operation has been the renumbering of a Farish class 101 and other modifications.

One of the more challenging aspects was replacing the destination blinds, which come as supplied with the rather out of area "King's Lynn" and "Cambridge". These destination blinds work by having a two piece transparent plastic insert into the recess in the cab front. On the back of the outer piece of plastic is printed the destination indicator.

I had some custom transfers for suitable destination indicators made up by Railtec, and initially tried to have replacement bits of transparent plastic 3d printed to get a very precise size and shape, but it transpired not to be possible to make one this small, so I resorted to the more traditional method of fabricating these parts from an A4 sheet of 1mm thick transparent plastic sheet with a sharp knife. The transfers were then inserted into the gap between that and the rear transparent plastic piece, which I retained, and, if the plastic sheet was cut so as to be a press-fit, the destination blind will readily stay in place.

Graham Farish class 101 by James Petts, on Flickr

Graham Farish class 101 by James Petts, on Flickr

I also renumbered the set to L207 (in its 1989 condition without subsector markings, which had appeared by the time of the Martin Loader picture in the link previously, taken in 1990).

1989-06-10 54396, 51221  Windsor & Eton Central by John Carter, on Flickr

Graham Farish class 101 by James Petts, on Flickr

Edit: I have just noticed that set L207 did not have NSE flashes in 1989; I think that I shall have to get the Brasso out to remove these.

After renumbering the set, however, I realised that the Farish DMU represents a power twin, whereas L207 is a DMBS+DTCL pair, so I had to convert the DMCL to a DTCL. I did this by removing many of the motor gubbins underneath the chassis and repositioning some of the other non-motor gubbins to their correct positions. The battery box had to be cut in two and positioned one half on each side. Still missing are the prominent vacuum brake cylinders, hangers and tanks visible in pictures such as this:

L207-54396-51221 by darren reay, on Flickr

as these are not something that I can simply re-purpose from some of the motor carriage gubbins. I may well have to have these 3d printed, although the underframe does not look too far off now; one can at least easily tell that it is a DTCL rather than a DMCL.

Graham Farish class 101 by James Petts, on Flickr

Graham Farish class 101 by James Petts, on Flickr

Graham Farish class 101 by James Petts, on Flickr

A slightly trickier job than anticipated was removing the exhaust pipes on what became the DTCL, as these were quite firmly glued in place and removing them removed much of the black paint surrounding them. I had to use Milliput to fill the holes and file it down, then paint over with black. I am not entirely happy with the brushed finish on this paint, but I am not sure whether it is worth the effort to mask and spray the ends as these are barely visible when the units are coupled.

I also fitted a stay alive to this unit. The decoder is a Zimo MX622N and the stay alive is a Zimo SACC16 kit with 5 220uF tantalum capacitors, giving 1.1mF capacitance in total. Two of the capacitors are soldered directly to the solder pads on the SACC16, the other three are soldered to a pair of scrap pieces of brass that I had earlier used for solder practice, wired to the terminals on the other side of the SACC16 and covered in thin electrically insulating tape to prevent shorts. It was done this way because the body would not fit over the chassis with double height capacitors. The extra capacitors are in the recess near the guard's door in the DMBS unit; a slight downside is that these are just about visible through the door, although they may be less visible if I use black rather than yellow electrical tape. I believe that I could probably fit another 2-3 capacitors soldered to the other side of the brass strips, as there is a reasonable amount of space in this area.

Performance with the stay alives is good; I am able to get the unit to go at least a fair distance around my little test layout, including over points, at speed step 1 without stalling.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2019, 01:51:00 AM by jamespetts »

Online crewearpley40

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Re: Oxcott [Thames valley 1989/Network SouthEast]
« Reply #44 on: May 03, 2019, 03:31:31 AM »
looking good james with the class 101, a favourite unit of mine !!!

to give asuggestion to think through


you noticed that set L207 did not have NSE flashes in 1989; I think that I shall have to get the Brasso out to remove these.


it applies to n gauge too but i read up on :

http://www.replicarailways.co.uk/transfers/transfer-application

t cut remover from a motorist's shop, cocktail stick

just had that thought. chris
« Last Edit: May 03, 2019, 07:35:21 AM by crewearpley40 »

 

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