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Poll

Would you be interested in purchasing if available in RTR format the JGA Bulk Cement Wagon?

Less than 5 in a single livery
5 (18.5%)
Less than 5 in multiple liveries
3 (11.1%)
Up to 10 in a single Livery
4 (14.8%)
Up to 10 in a multiple Liveries
5 (18.5%)
More than 10 in a single livery
1 (3.7%)
More than 10 in multiple liveries
9 (33.3%)

Total Members Voted: 27

Author Topic: Suggestion for Revolution: JGA-M/N (Buxton Lime Industries) Bulk Cement Carrier  (Read 1980 times)

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Offline acko22

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JGA-M/N (Buxton Lime Industries) Bulk Cement Carrier

:censored:NOTE AS YOUR READ THIS I HAD TO DO IT TWICE AS I REFRESHED THE PAGE AND LOST IT SO HAD TO START AGAIN :dunce:


OVERVIEW

The JGA - M Bulk Cement carrier was introduced to service in 2003 at the request of Buxton Lime Industries for its new loading terminal at its Tunstead site to bulk storage sites around the UK. Since introduction there has been 3 separate batches produced with the latest one been in 2016 and a complete fleet size of around 70 wagons all based from Tunstead.
The orignal batch was built by Arbel-Fuuvet of France based on the JGA Bulk Aggregate hoppers which were introduced in the 1980s and 1990s (The most recognizable of JGA fleet been the Orange former RMC wagons), however the second batch differed from the first and last as these were conversions from aggregate to powder cement variants.

The wagons carry the JGA prefix due to the commonality of the wagon design to the aggregate variant although as it is a tank wagon and not a hopper the TOPS prefix JCA or JDA would be more appropriate (It still confuses staff today why its a JGA wagon - which identifies it as a hopper wagon).

Since been introduced the wagons have changed operators when in late 2010 Tarmac acquired Buxton Lime Industries, at this time the company running the JGA services also moved from EWS to Freightliner Heavy Haul. To date there are approximately 70 of these wagons in daily use on the network which makes it one of the more sizable specialist fleets running on the network. Although operated by Tarmac the wagons are leased from 2 different companies the first two batches are leased from VTG and the final batch is from Ermewa.

DESIGN

The JGA Bulk Cement Carrier, was based around the design of the successful JGA bulk aggregate hopper, sharing the same Y25 bogies that have become almost standard for heavy good trains and the same chassis, although due to design differences of the storage compartments between the 2 wagons element of the braking systems have had to be moved to be better accommodated.

The design specifications begin:

Wagon details JGA-M; BLI11701-30 to Design Code JG016A; dimensions 13.84 x 2.82m; cap. 64.0t, tare 26.0t; 60mph. Registration code 32BLI.
As part of this design the wagons had to be capable of been transported through the channel tunnel for any service customer on the European mainline, although to date there has been no such workings.

The design allowed for a total weight of 90 tonnes carrying 64 tonnes of goods per wagon, with 2 access / loading hatches on the roof and 4 discharge valves on the bottom of the stowage compartment. The stowage compartment dips to the center bottom to allow for gravity discharge from the wagons on reaching its unloading point.

The first batch were built in France with an initial order of 30 wagons arriving in the UK in 2003 they were placed in storage at Tunstead under Canvas until accepted into traffic by Network Rail, these first 30 wagons were numbered 11701 to 11730.

The second batch was purchased in late 2010 after Tarmac took over Tunstead, but unlike the first batch were not new builds but using the knowledge that the chassis and bogies were the same were constructed by using Bulk Aggregate hoppers which were begin made surplus by HOA wagons as donor chassis instead with the work been done by Davies Wagons services of Immingham.

The final batch of 16 were a new build purchased in 2016 and these wagons differ from the first 2 batches, while cosmetically appearing 95% the same as the first batches, been no larger in external dimensions the latest batch have a maximum weight of 100 tonnes with a capacity of 72 tonnes. This is in part to an redesign that made the wagons stronger and capable to carry the extra weight.
The exterior difference between the batches (discounting livery) is on one end of the wagon when a compressed air line is fitted into the top of the tanks so that compressed air can be pumped in during unloading of the wagons to ensure faster unload times and ensure all the powder is discharged.
Also there are a few extra lugs on the side of the newer wagons to aid in maintenance as it was identified that fixed lifting points on the main body of the wagon would aid in lifting as required,  due to the difference in weight capacity these wagons were classified as JGA-N

LIVERIES

Since its introduction in 2003 the wagons have carried 3 general liveries and there has been one unique wagon.


Wagon 11716 received Buxton Lime Industries markings in 2003 as it was been used as an exhibit at the Hillhead trade show/exhibition, and carried that until it was repainted in early 2011.


The original batch arrived in the UK in a plain light grey livery with White identification markings on the side of the main tank, over half the original fleet remain in this livery the others been repainted into Tarmac livery, although the white identification markings (which have to be visible) require frequent cleaning off due to a light dusting of cement makes them unreadable.


On Tarmac taking over the second batch arrived in the Tarmac White, Green and Yellow livery and as of spring 2011 some of the original batch were painted into this livery.


The most recent livery is on the final batch which arrived in 2016, this is a plain grey but with the new corporate markings of Tarmac and the Ermewa logo on the side of the wagon, but using lesson learn't choose to have the identifications markings in black to stand out when the cement dust covers the wagons!

WORKINGS

PLEASE NOTE THAT NOT ALL CURRENT WORKINGS MAY BE 100% ACCURATE - THESE WORKING WHERE UNCERTAIN WILL BE IN RED AND HAVE BEEN TAKEN FROM UNDERSTANDING OF THE ROUTES, TRAIN CLASSIFICATION AND WEIGHTS BY SOMEONE WHO WORKS ON THE RAILWAYS

Original flows (August 2003):

Tunstead - Willsden (2/3 trains per week)
Tunstead - Walsall (2/3 trains per week)
Tunstead - Bredbury (1/2 trains per week)
Tunstead - York Up good Yard (1/2 trains per week)
Tunstead - Westbury (Added since original post - unknown trains per week)

However these could be increased if / as / when required.
They normally operated in rakes of 10 - 15 wagons however at times they were noted running in as little a rake a 4 to Bredbury.

Current workings (May 2018):

Tunstead - Willsden (2/3 trains per week)
Tunstead - Walsall (2/3 trains per week)
Tunstead - Bredbury (1 train per week)
Tunstead - Pendlton (ad hoc basis although generally 1 per week)
Tustead - Seaham Harbour (2/3 Per week)
Tunstead - West Thurrock (2/3 Per week)
Tunstead - Brentford Town Days (2-4 per week)
West Thurrock - Owwellmains (Added since original post - unknown trains per week)

They normally operate in rakes of 10 - 15 and up to 20 or as little as 2 have been noted.

Theses services see the wagons regularly on the WCML and around parts of Manchester with the Bredbury, Pendleton coming from the peak district via Romiley and Hyde with the Pendleton service going around the east and northern sides of Manchester. The Willsden service heads through south Manchester on the former CLC route passing through Altrincham en route to Crewe Basford Hall to join the WCML.

PROs AND CONs

PROs
  • The wagons are relatively young (in usage terms) only been in service since 15 years giving the possibility of multiple runs as the wagon sees out it's service life
  • It shares the same Y25 Bogies as the TEA, KFA and HOA
  • The livery options are simple and limited preventing any issues with livery options
  • It has a large geographical coverage both in real terms and in modelling terms as bulk freight can appear anywhere unlike passenger stock which is can be limited to a region or route
  • As older wagons are taken off the network there is a high likely hood that more of this design may be ordered by Tarmac making this a more noticeable wagon on the railways and as such for modelling
  • Similar fleet size to the Castle Cement JPA wagons, which have proven popular (around 62 JPAs on the network)
  • Not produced in N gauge or OO in any format
  • Can be used to model rakes from as little a 2 all the way to 20 wagons
  • Been hauled by various operators EWS and Freightliner the most prevalent
  • Unique look compared to other bulk powder wagons (especially on the ends)
  • Complements the HOA wagons and other models such as the PCA

CONs
  • Currently a smaller fleet when compared to other fleets such as the HOA and PCA*
  • For 100% authentic modeler this wagon may not be of interest due to its more North west England and southern basis of usage
  • Only of interest to modern image modellers
  • Unlike other wagons this wagon has only been known to operate in rake of the same design
* The PCA wagon is one of the wagons looking at been replaced on the network due to the bogie design (Gloucester Mk4 Pedestal Suspension), which doesn't comply with current design regulations and is in the top bracket for track access charges making it less economic per ton compared to newer designs.

SUMMARY

The JGA-M/N is a specialist wagon that sees daily usage on the network and with the withdrawal of older less cost effective designs becoming closer is likely to become the mainstay of this type of working for Tarmac and potentially other operators I see this as a very good choice of wagon for Revolution Trains to consider.

While there are number of Cons against this model the main one I feel been the small real life fleet size which may be an issue for some modelers I feel that due to its very generic livery it can be used by pretty much any modern image modeler for any region whilst also looking strikingly different to any other bulk powder carrier actually on the network and is currently not available in N gauge or OO gauges which gives it a great potential market.
While its design is very limited in the sense that It is designed to carry one type of cargo (bulk powder) and the issue that it doesn't run with any other variant (to my knowledge), I feel that it is a great design to select as in its real life running it can be used as a large rake right down to just a few wagons meaning it doesn't isolate modelers who may want a number but don't have the layout to run a 15 wagon rake.
On looking at similar types of wagons (Castle Cement JPA - Produced by Farish) this type of wagon has proven popular and sold over multiple runs, something I feel this wagon has the potential to do extremely well all whilst complementing existing models.
Finally going through imagery this wagon has been seen with multiple locomotives hauling (Class 60, 66, 90, 92) which adds value to the myriad of scenarios this model could be placed and adds to its versatility which can be replicated as a model.

Thanks for reading and if there is an error or omission please let me know!

Cheers

Gareth 
« Last Edit: June 11, 2018, 11:48:44 PM by acko22 »

Offline njee20

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A very detailed proposal, and makes a reasonable amount of sense. Theoretically right in my area of interest, but... I’d never heard of them, nor seen them in the wild, so not sure i’d get a rake quite honestly. Perhaps one or two, but then if they only work as block trains that’s not very likely.

They look quite interesting though.

Offline Ben A

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Hi all,

Thanks acko for that proposal - really well presented and thought through.

Your point about the bogies is very valid; and they are certainly eye-catching.  I saw some of these up at Peak Forest a couple of months ago.

One other 'con' I would add is the complexity of the design and shape. I am thinking particularly of the underside ribs and end strengtheners - there seem to be quite a few undercuts that can be very difficult to mould.

Having said that, all that detail if well represented would make the wagons very attractive once done.

Definitely one to think about!

Cheers

Ben A.



Offline red_death

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Sheer, utter filth- I love it! These wagons are right up my street and I'd love to be able to do them.  I even have some drawings of the original batch.

To reinforce what Gareth has said these wagons pop up in the most bizarre places - I often see a rake around various parts of London.

We haven't done a cement carrying wagon yet so over to our customers is this something you'd be interested in.

Cheers, Mike



Offline Vonzack

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Great idea, I'd go for some, they look quite different.

27 behind EWS 66s here - https://youtu.be/VuKuO6KeZKo and here - https://youtu.be/rzQ_pUxFCmg

Online RailGooner

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A very interesting read Gareth, on a wagon that's new to me.
 :thankyousign:

I particularly like the Tarmac white/green/yellow livery. Would probably run to:
1x BLI exhibition livery
3x Tarmac white/green/yellow livery
3x 4x Tarmac/Ermewa livery
« Last Edit: June 11, 2018, 11:26:55 PM by RailGooner, Reason: ITALICS »
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Offline acko22

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One other 'con' I would add is the complexity of the design and shape. I am thinking particularly of the underside ribs and end strengtheners - there seem to be quite a few undercuts that can be very difficult to mould.



Ben,

you make a very valid point it certainly does make it a rather challenging one to be polite! Having a look I had brief ideas on how I would try to make it work but been honest it probably wouldn't work so if this wagon were to go ahead at some stage I'd leave it completely to the professionals, of which I am not!

@Vonzack them videos are great and I spotted one glaring issue now the unique BLI livered wagon was still carrying that livery in 2012 (seen in the Stafford video, so now its back to my contacts to see if we can find out exactly when it was repainted!  :doh: If any thing that for my personal understanding if nothing else as that will pester me!

@njee20 Until Christmas time I had no idea these existed until a service passed me at Atrincham, but they caught my eye and interest which has led to this, according to my old man they are rather regular visitors these days through Altrincham. But fairly as you say if it was a large rake only I would discount the wagon for a lot of people, but with it also operating in smaller rakes down to the 2 wagons it makes it a much more palatable proposition.

And finally as I have had a bit more info - There was also a flow in 2004 / 05 from Tunstead to Westbury, Wiltshire on a Sunday only service.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2018, 03:07:51 PM by acko22 »

Offline NTrains

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These are local to me, passing through Stockport on a regular basis on their way via Altincham, so I would certainly be interested in a rake of these.

Offline westie7

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IIRC I've seen these behind Colas 60's either uddingston or oxwellmains

Offline acko22

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IIRC I've seen these behind Colas 60's either uddingston or oxwellmains


Hi @westie7
Your are indeed correct I used youtube as I know the the JPAs are used a lot up there but I found a video of a Colas 60 on a West Thurrock to Oxwellmains service with the JGA



So i will add it to the original list

Offline njee20

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Mmm, that is interesting. My Colas 60 is devoid of something to pull :hmmm:

Offline westie7

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Mmm, that is interesting. My Colas 60 is devoid of something to pull :hmmm:

For now, PCAs and Cargowaggons 😉

Offline NGS-PO

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Out of interest, what made you pick the JGAs of the JPAs? It's well out of my era, I was just wondering what the thought process was......
PLEASE NOTE: Unless where obviously posting on behalf of the NGS, all posts and views are my own and not connected/endorsed by the Society.

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Offline njee20

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Farish already do an excellent JPA. They've not yet done the slightly tweaked Tarmac variant, but it's not enough of a variation on the Lafarge/Castle ones to justify a totally new product.

Offline NGS-PO

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Ah, okay. Thanks.
PLEASE NOTE: Unless where obviously posting on behalf of the NGS, all posts and views are my own and not connected/endorsed by the Society.

“Having anxiety and depression is like being scared and tired at the same time. It's the fear of failure, but no urge to be productive. It's wanting friends, but hate socializing. It's wanting to be alone, but not wanting to be lonely. It's feeling everything at once then feeling paralyzingly numb.”

We're not crazy, or insane, we're just people living with a condition.

 

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