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Author Topic: Broadstone Junction - modern layout of Dorset station closed by you-know-who.  (Read 2098 times)

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Offline Bealman

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I have used a Fleischmann track rubber since 1990, (gone through two), but realise now it's not really the best answer.

It does make a fine dust mess that has to be vacuumed up, and inevitably damage the layout while doing that.

As John says, one of the "joys" of model railways.

No, I correct myself.

Ballasting.  :sick2:  ;)
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline Thebaz

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The spontaneous accumulation of muck on the track is one of the joys of two-rail electric model railways.  There are many ways of cleaning track and Laurence has made a very helpful suggestion.  In my view, it's best to avoid track rubbers in 'N' gauge, although a less abrasive alternative can be particularly useful.

My preference requires a visit to the wines section of a supermarket.  What appears to be ideal is something like Waitrose 'Good Ordinary Claret'.  French producers tend to avoid screw-tops.  More expensive wines will have natural corks.  The 6.00 - 7.00 price is about right and, if you are lucky, you'll enjoy the wine.  Thereafter, the synthetic cork will be perfect for cleaning your track.  And, when the cork wears out...

I have probably taken this approach to an extreme with my 'four cork system', but I like to keep the track on my little layout as clean as I can.

I hope all is well with your layout very soon.

Best wishes.

John

Thanks for the advice. If only I drank wine - Mind you having said that I have plenty of corked Belgian beers under the stairs so I guess I'll be breaking some of them out!

On a serious note, why are track rubbers bad on N gauge?

Offline Train Waiting

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In my view, for two reasons.

They are abrasive and I assume will leave tiny scratches on the head of the rail.  These scratches will be ideal places for that horrid track dirt to accumulate, making the use of an abrasive track cleaner paradoxically counter-productive.  Please note that I don't have a microscope to prove this.  The artificial cork I mentioned is non-abrasive.  Real corks work too, but not, in my experience, as well as the synthetic variety.

They also, as @Bealman mentioned, seem to create a lot of fine dust which, if not vacuumed up, goes who-knows-where.

Good electrical pick-up is important for a good tempered model railway.  The ways to achieve this are a lot of pick-ups on the locomotive (and tender if there is one), compensation (or springing), weight and cleanliness of track and stock.  The last one is easily within the modeller's control.  Incidentally, BR had a similar problem with some small diesel shunting locomotives not reliably activating track circuits (bad, very bad!).  The solution was akin to our additional pick-ups; attach a wagon to the locomotive!

Best wishes.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1930s to the 1950s.

For the made-up background to the railway and list of characters, please see here: https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=38281.msg607991#msg607991

Offline Thebaz

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IPA on clean card should do the trick, wiping over with fresh clean card afterwards.

Coming back to this, what do you mean exactly by 'on clean card'? I've not heard of this method before.

Online njee20

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You can literally use a piece of cardboard (or timber) to wipe the railheads.

Offline Innovationgame

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IPA on clean card should do the trick, wiping over with fresh clean card afterwards.

Coming back to this, what do you mean exactly by 'on clean card'? I've not heard of this method before.
I cut up old Metcalfe kit packets into stips and use the reverse side.  Using a syringe, I put a little iPA on one end and press it onto the rails with my finger behind it, running it around for two or three metres.  Then I take the other end of the card stip and repeat, without the IPA.  After that, I cut off both ends, which will be quite black by then, and start again on a new section of track with the same strip of card, which will be shorter, of course.  I continue until the strip of card is too short to be used any more and then start again with a new strip.  I clean the whole track like that.  For the branch line, because the locos are all tank engines, I then apply a graphite crayon to the rails to increase conductivity between the track and the wheels.  I don't do this on the mainline because the locomotives generally have move pickup points and the graphite causes wheel slip when the trains are long.

I hope this helps.
With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
Coventry Corporation Transport Society: www.cct-society.org.uk
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Offline Thebaz

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IPA on clean card should do the trick, wiping over with fresh clean card afterwards.

Coming back to this, what do you mean exactly by 'on clean card'? I've not heard of this method before.
I cut up old Metcalfe kit packets into stips and use the reverse side.  Using a syringe, I put a little iPA on one end and press it onto the rails with my finger behind it, running it around for two or three metres.  Then I take the other end of the card stip and repeat, without the IPA.  After that, I cut off both ends, which will be quite black by then, and start again on a new section of track with the same strip of card, which will be shorter, of course.  I continue until the strip of card is too short to be used any more and then start again with a new strip.  I clean the whole track like that.  For the branch line, because the locos are all tank engines, I then apply a graphite crayon to the rails to increase conductivity between the track and the wheels.  I don't do this on the mainline because the locomotives generally have move pickup points and the graphite causes wheel slip when the trains are long.

I hope this helps.

Thanks, I get it now. Also just discovered that I can use a fibreglass pencil, which seems to do a very effective cleaning job. How the trains run afterwards though, I won't know until I set it up to test again.

Offline Thebaz

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Been working on installing the third rail using tips provided by LA Steve and I have to say it works a treat. Bought some lengths of code 40 rail, painted with Railmatch oily steel and attached to track pins drilled into every 7th sleeper. It looks really good IMO. Any suggestions for what to use for the HV cabling between the gaps? I've tried. 7.0 electric wire but it's still too big.

Also will be looking to plan my buildings in AutoCAD. I have sourced some good B&W photos of the Broadstone Station buildings but of course I cannot fathom what the colour scheme might have been - the main - rather shabby looking - building would seem to be a bit of a hotchpotch. Of more interest is the island platform building which is clearly all brick - but what colour? Perhaps Dorset Mike might be ae to assist here?

Offline Gizzy

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Just found this thread.

I don't know the location at all, but it looks like a very interesting junction.

And I like the way you have split your base boards, with the fiddle yard on one board and the scenic on the other.
If only I'd thought of that for my layout Rhaetia, as I have to consider how I am going to model a river cross a baseboard joint!

Although I have solved how the track crosses the joins....
Gizzy

Gentleman, scholar, railway modeller....

Offline Dorsetmike

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The small brick building on the island platform was a fairly dark red brick. The bridge was still SR green and cream

IF you Google Broadstone station images there are a few useful images including one from what looks like an enthusiasts special in 1976 showing the platform 1 building  - also  green and cream - the line was still in use for freight.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=broadstone+station+dorset&hl=en-GB&gbv=2&biw=1383&bih=612&tbm=isch&ei=gtWBXo7BN9-ChbIPzvmw2AQ&start=0&sa=N
Cheers MIKE
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Offline Thebaz

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Just found this thread.

I don't know the location at all, but it looks like a very interesting junction.

And I like the way you have split your base boards, with the fiddle yard on one board and the scenic on the other.
If only I'd thought of that for my layout Rhaetia, as I have to consider how I am going to model a river cross a baseboard joint!

Although I have solved how the track crosses the joins....

Thanks! My baseboard design was due to the necessity of having it as portable as possible. Having to to be able to put it through the loft hatch out of the way lead to the lengthways split. Originally I want this layout to be end-to-end but it would have turned out enormously long (for my living space at any rate) so I went for the looped fiddle-yard which then give the option to run trains in a circuit as well.

Good luck with modelling Rhaetia - I went on the Bernina Express last year and the scenery is jaw-dropping!

Offline Thebaz

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The small brick building on the island platform was a fairly dark red brick. The bridge was still SR green and cream

IF you Google Broadstone station images there are a few useful images including one from what looks like an enthusiasts special in 1976 showing the platform 1 building  - also  green and cream - the line was still in use for freight.


Thanks for the info Mike, I'd forgotten I'd seen the main station building colour photo before. I previously found this picture https://www.railwaystationphotographs.co.uk/broadstone-railway-station-photo-wimborne-to-poole-and-hamworthy-lines-9-4967-p.asp of the island platform shelter. It's really help to know now that it was red brick, so I can now get on with my plans for the buildings.

 

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