!!

Not Registered?

Welcome!  Please register to view all of the new posts and forum boards - some of which are hidden to guests.  After registering and gaining 10 posts you will be able to sell and buy items on our N'porium.

If you have any problems registering, then please check your spam filter before emailing us.  Hotmail users seem to find their emails in the Junk folder.


Thanks for reading,
The NGF Staff.

Author Topic: Wrenton  (Read 125734 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline rogerdB

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 27380
  • Posts: 903
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Wrenton
« Reply #285 on: November 06, 2017, 09:38:09 PM »
It occurs to me that this is not a railway layout at all,but  a very splendid model of a village that happens to have a railway running by it.

Thanks - exactly my intention!

Offline rogerdB

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 27380
  • Posts: 903
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Wrenton
« Reply #286 on: November 08, 2017, 02:30:27 PM »
I've painted and assembled more Peco wagon kits. A couple each of the tarpaulin wagons, plate wagons and five and seven plank opens. They've been added to a short train shown in an earlier post to make it up to a reasonable length. I'll try to do some closer views of some of the wagons when I next get the lights and camera in action.


Offline rogerdB

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 27380
  • Posts: 903
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Wrenton
« Reply #287 on: November 09, 2017, 10:35:46 PM »
Here are a couple of closer views of the wagons in the previous photo. The opens with tarpaulins were described in an earlier post. After them are three opens with Peco wagon loads. To avoid having each load looking the same I cut one in half and swapped the two parts around.



A couple of tarpaulin wagons made from Peco kits come next. As with the opens the tarps are made from tissue paper. I coated the paper with PVA before painting.


Offline lil chris

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23889
  • Posts: 3255
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Wrenton
« Reply #288 on: November 10, 2017, 12:10:25 AM »
Looking good there, I need to make some of those tarpaulin wagons, mind you there is a lot I need to do especially too catch up to your standard of modeling.
Lil Chris
My new layout here, Irwell Valley Railway. https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=47127.0

my old layout was East Lancashire Lines.

Offline mitch99

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 21
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Wrenton
« Reply #289 on: November 10, 2017, 09:22:44 PM »
Wonderful modelling, some of the pictures could be the real thing. The village scene is particularly inspiring, if I can achieve something one tenth as good I’ll be a happy man! Thank your for sharing you layout

Offline Delboy

  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 822
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Wrenton
« Reply #290 on: November 11, 2017, 12:39:56 PM »
Hi Roger,
Tarps look great. To save anyone searching for the Tarp thread method it is described by Roger on Page 15.

 :beers:
She who must be obeyed says I am spending too much time on this forum. I love her dearly but what does she know?

Offline rogerdB

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 27380
  • Posts: 903
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Wrenton
« Reply #291 on: November 12, 2017, 08:00:15 PM »
Here are  a couple more photos to show more of the train shown in my last post. First a couple of plate wagons, built from Peco kits.



The plates are a couple of pieces of 20thou plastikard for each wagon and the chains were made by tightly twisting together a couple of strands pulled from a piece of hook-up wire.

Three loaded opens come next.



The first wagon has a load of pallets, the second has some Faller barrels and the third carries some large timbers – matchsticks! A Peco kit built, and rather tired looking, brake van complete the train.

Offline Mito

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2317
  • Country: es
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Wrenton
« Reply #292 on: November 12, 2017, 09:19:26 PM »
Not being pedantic, but do you know when pallets were first introduced?
I'm sorry, I've run out of superlatives for you layout. Just great.
You know you're getting older when your mind makes commitments your body can't meet.
https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=40567.0 125x60 and a bit.
https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=24101.0 Off on a journey

Online RailGooner

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 17356
  • Posts: 2966
  • Country: gb
  • I'm supporting Soldier F
    • Ebay
    • my Flickr Albums
    • Awards
Re: Wrenton
« Reply #293 on: November 12, 2017, 09:27:37 PM »
..
 do you know when pallets were first introduced?
...

They've been around since the 1st millennium BC if not earlier.
“We are indebted to those soldiers who served with courage and distinction to bring peace to Northern Ireland,” UK Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said. “The welfare of our former service personnel is of the utmost importance.”

Per Ardua ad Astra | Mens Agitat Molem | Victoria Concordia Crescit | Utrinque Paratus | Caveat lector

Offline Mito

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2317
  • Country: es
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Wrenton
« Reply #294 on: November 12, 2017, 09:41:33 PM »
..
 do you know when pallets were first introduced?
...

They've been around since the 1st millennium BC if not earlier.

I wondered why mine were so rotten. :D
You know you're getting older when your mind makes commitments your body can't meet.
https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=40567.0 125x60 and a bit.
https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=24101.0 Off on a journey

Offline rogerdB

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 27380
  • Posts: 903
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Wrenton
« Reply #295 on: November 12, 2017, 10:36:16 PM »
Not being pedantic, but do you know when pallets were first introduced?

According to https://www.1001pallets.com/the-history-of-pallets/ what we think of as a pallet dates from the 1920s with the invention of the forklift truck.

Offline pape_timmo

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23256
  • Posts: 507
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Ebay
    • YouTube
    • Awards
Re: Wrenton
« Reply #296 on: November 12, 2017, 11:11:55 PM »
You learn something new every day. Didn't know that about pallets.

Such excellent modelling on this layout, it all looks so real. Hugely impressed.

Cheers, Timmo
There’s the right way, the wrong way, and the Railway...

My YouTube channel
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxeUUCqEw_rWo229kmnizFQ

Offline keithbythe sea

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1314
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Wrenton
« Reply #297 on: November 13, 2017, 08:07:38 AM »
..
 do you know when pallets were first introduced?
...

They've been around since the 1st millennium BC if not earlier.

I think it’s earlier. How else did they deliver the materials to build the pyramids?  :hmmm:

Offline Innovationgame

  • Larger Gallery
  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 26531
  • Posts: 3130
  • Country: gb
    • The innovationgame
    • Awards
Re: Wrenton
« Reply #298 on: November 13, 2017, 08:58:24 AM »
 :offtopicsign: The pyramids, Stonehenge and the Inca buildings were probably built using what were known as skids, which would have been sledge-like objects.  The Pallet website stated that pallets, which were specifically designed for the new-fangled fork lift trucks, where develpoed from skids: "Boards were fastened to stringers to create a platform for the product to sit on and a space underneath that could easily accommodate the prongs of the forklift’. In 1925, bottom planks were added to the design. This addition led to the concept of stacking, which allowed goods to be moved, stored and stacked with extraordinary speed and versatility."
With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
Coventry Corporation Transport Society: www.cct-society.org.uk
Hessle: www.hessle.org.uk

Offline rogerdB

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 27380
  • Posts: 903
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Wrenton
« Reply #299 on: November 13, 2017, 09:27:13 AM »
:offtopicsign: The pyramids, Stonehenge and the Inca buildings were probably built using what were known as skids, which would have been sledge-like objects. 

Got there before me, Laurence! In books about Egypt they usually use the word sledge and the shape is often used symbolically in items which would never be dragged - see for example a photo of the container of Tutankhamun's canopic jars http://www.ancient-egypt.co.uk/cairo%20museum/cm,%20tutankhamun,%20burial/pages/tutankhamun%27s%20canopic%20jars%202.htm. A common theory relating to pyramid construction is that they built trackways of hardcore and railway-like sleepers covered with mud. It's then not too difficult, they say, to drag large stones along without any sledge, or pallet. Though I'd prefer not to try! Even more off topic, sorry...

 

Please Support Us!
December Goal: £60.00
Due Date: Dec 31
Total Receipts: £15.00
Below Goal: £45.00
Site Currency: GBP
25% 
December Donations


Advertise Here
anything