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Author Topic: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)  (Read 55258 times)

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Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #195 on: September 12, 2016, 10:41:03 PM »
Hey Ho, Richard. We all learn by experimenting. I tried Woodland Scenics 'cement' sprayed over flock materials and did it stick? Did it :censored:
I had to revert to the good ole PVA dilute to get anything to stay put. It's worth getting one of those 'misting' bottles from your local chemist as that way you don't blast away the scatter materials.

I'm never afraid of failure, good job too.  If you want to build a really nice layout, read this thread and then do everything differently to how I have done it. You'll save a lot of time. Misting bottle is a good tip, I'll track one down.

Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #196 on: September 14, 2016, 09:31:13 PM »
I'm enjoying N gauge gardening a bit more than the real thing:



Hedges are the same as my previous layout - strips of green pan scourer soaked in diluted PVA, rolled in flock and left to dry. I have no idea what the plants in the vegetable patch are - just odds and ends stuck down, including some bits snipped from the really terrible ready made hedge strips that I bought a couple of years ago.  The bright green colour looks less offensive in small patches. There is also a rubbish heap - wonder if I can bury a small smoke unit in it?

I have been trying to think how the stationmaster would have kept the grass down, given that it isn't a very level garden.  The answer is a couple of sheep, so I will need to fence off the vegetable plot and evict the two dogs who shouldn't be in it anyway as they will probably wee on the cabbages. The fencing will also keep out the rabbits which live in the overgrown area by the buffer stop. I also have a tree on order - I gave up with my home-made one as it is just too big for the site.  Also to come, a small pre-fab garage, some fencing and a gate to stop the sheep escaping, and a garden shed.

I'm still not sure that the garden will impress the distinguished visitors from last week. I doubt it will feature on one of the station garden tours that the North-Eastern like to run in the summer.  In fact the whole station is looking a bit ramshackle, with weeds rapidly engulfing the cattle dock. Anyone would think the line was about to close.

Richard


Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #197 on: September 14, 2016, 10:12:50 PM »
Have you been growing the wrong sort of mushrooms? :laugh3: ;)

Online lil chris

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #198 on: September 15, 2016, 12:43:52 AM »
Looking good there, like Mick I am not impressed with the woodland scenics spray cement and I bought the spray bottle too for it. If your not carefull it blasts everything all over the place, a plant misting bottle is a lot more sensitive.
Lil Chris
My new layout here, Irwell Valley Railway. https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=47127.0

my old layout was East Lancashire Lines.

Offline Webbo

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #199 on: September 15, 2016, 02:33:24 AM »
I agree that the Woodland Scenics spray bottle is good for recreating a lunar surface. I've found a nice mister in an arts supply shop (no shades of Little Britain intended).

Looking good, Richard
Webbo

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #200 on: September 15, 2016, 05:50:41 AM »
Looking good there, like Mick I am not impressed with the woodland scenics spray cement and I bought the spray bottle too for it. If your not carefull it blasts everything all over the place, a plant misting bottle is a lot more sensitive.

I fully agree that an adjustable flow plant misting bottle and diluted white glue works very well and is very economic. All the ground cover at Cant Cove was done this way.

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #201 on: September 15, 2016, 05:52:48 AM »
Excellent scenic work, Richard; highly realistic. A washing line with clothes on it, next? (There is also a German N scale plastic set complete with housewife.)

Offline kirky

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #202 on: September 16, 2016, 06:38:43 PM »
Richard
Its beginning to look really really good. Im still salivating over the track work which is just superb. But I am wondering if you are going to paint the rails?
I think I've come up with a track plan for my own Finetrax layout. If I wasnt out of action with a knacked back I might have begun the project this weekend... oh well I'll just have to continue admiring Longframlington instead.

Cheers
Kirky
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Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #203 on: September 16, 2016, 08:09:09 PM »
It seems to be the season for ricked backs, Kirky.
You really need to either take more care with gardening/DIY or stop leaping off wardrobes ;)
@kirky

Offline kirky

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #204 on: September 16, 2016, 08:30:31 PM »
It seems to be the season for ricked backs, Kirky.
You really need to either take more care with gardening/DIY or stop leaping off wardrobes ;)
@kirky

Cheers (@newportnobby) Mick, I wish it had been as interesting as jumping off wardrobes. Sad truth is I took the kids swimming last Sunday and afterwards when getting changed I bent down to pick something off the floor and me back went. Bloody annoying I tell yer.
I now have a choice of two states, a) in pain but reasonably alert or b) in no pain but totally zonked out. Today I have chosen option 'a'.

Cheers
Kirky
Northallerton will make its next public appearance at the LINCOLN MODEL RAILWAY CLUB ANNUAL EXHIBITION Feb 29th -1st Mar 2020



Layout: Northallerton: http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=1671.msg16930#msg16930

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Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #205 on: September 16, 2016, 08:35:31 PM »
Very sorry to read that, Kirky. I hope that your back gets better, soon.

Offline kirky

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #206 on: September 16, 2016, 11:07:21 PM »
Hi Richard
@belstone
Ive got a couple more questions re finetrax Richard, I hope you don't mind?

Are all your points B6 turnouts?
How come you've got gaps between the sleeper base in the point work?, did you cut the point bases?
Have you painted the bottom of the frog? Yours dont look anything like the cast frogs I have. Mine are all B6 points with a cast frog.
Droppers: did you solder onto the frog directly or did you use a pin as per 2mil practice?
And finally, did you end up using 2mm Association Easitrack brass sleepers at all?

I've just watched the video you posted a couple of months ago, again tonight. I'm still in awe of that control at this scale. Just superb.

Cheers
Kirky
Northallerton will make its next public appearance at the LINCOLN MODEL RAILWAY CLUB ANNUAL EXHIBITION Feb 29th -1st Mar 2020



Layout: Northallerton: http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=1671.msg16930#msg16930

www.northallertonngauge.co.uk

Cleveland Model Railway club website: www.clevelandmrc.club

Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #207 on: September 17, 2016, 07:18:29 AM »
Hi Richard
@belstone
Ive got a couple more questions re finetrax Richard, I hope you don't mind?

Are all your points B6 turnouts?
How come you've got gaps between the sleeper base in the point work?, did you cut the point bases?
Have you painted the bottom of the frog? Yours dont look anything like the cast frogs I have. Mine are all B6 points with a cast frog.
Droppers: did you solder onto the frog directly or did you use a pin as per 2mil practice?
And finally, did you end up using 2mm Association Easitrack brass sleepers at all?

I've just watched the video you posted a couple of months ago, again tonight. I'm still in awe of that control at this scale. Just superb.

Cheers
Kirky


B6 turnouts, but with fabricated rail frogs replacing the cast ones, and two PCB sleepers (one under the frog and one at the inner end of the switch rails.  The PCB sleepers (correctly gapped) reduce the need for wire droppers, and the wires can be soldered direct to the sleepers. I ground away some of the top surface with a minidrill so they are the same height as the plastic ones. They look OK when painted. I also replaced the clever but fiddly tiebars with old-fashioned soldered PCB ones. If you are going to do this (I'm not sure it is necessary, but I didn't trust the very thin wires that attach the chairplates to the tiebar), use the thickest PCB you can find, and cut a channel in the trackbed to clear the tiebar.  I started off with PCB the same thickness as the plastic sleepers and broke two tiebars.

I built the station throat formation in a single lump, so the two outer rails are solid lengths which makes for smoother running.  Obviously you need some spare 500mm rail lengths to do this.

I pre-charged each rail with chairs, sliding the rail into the chairs while they were still on the sprue then cutting them off with a scalpel.  That way all the plain chairs will be the right way round - they are handed and once off the sprue it is very hard to see which way round they go.  The chair pins are a bit tight in the track base and I eased out the holes with a drill bit.

To answer your earlier question, rails and chairs will be painted once I have finished the mucky scenic stuff, the trackbed will need another coat of paint and a few weeds first.

Have fun, and hope your back gets better soon.  I had the same problem a couple of weeks ago so you have my sympathy.

Richard

Offline kirky

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #208 on: September 17, 2016, 09:35:23 AM »
@belstone
Thanks Richard, very useful info. Yes I was wondering whether I could get away with using a single length of rail through more than one point. You've confirmed that thanks.
So frogs then..... where when who how much?

And this all begs the question - have you done this sort of thing before, perhaps in a different scale?

Cheers
Kirky
Northallerton will make its next public appearance at the LINCOLN MODEL RAILWAY CLUB ANNUAL EXHIBITION Feb 29th -1st Mar 2020



Layout: Northallerton: http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=1671.msg16930#msg16930

www.northallertonngauge.co.uk

Cleveland Model Railway club website: www.clevelandmrc.club

Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #209 on: September 17, 2016, 02:33:55 PM »
@belstone
Thanks Richard, very useful info. Yes I was wondering whether I could get away with using a single length of rail through more than one point. You've confirmed that thanks.
So frogs then..... where when who how much?

And this all begs the question - have you done this sort of thing before, perhaps in a different scale?

Cheers
Kirky


Frog crossing noses are just two pieces of rail filed to a point and soldered together using a very simple jig, just two rail-width slots cut in a sheet of plywood at a 1 in 6 angle.  The wing rails are separate pieces of rail with a bend in them.  The small bend at the ends is done with fine nose pliers once the wing rails are in position. There is a bit of fiddling about slicing chairs in half around the crossing to make it all look pretty. I made one mistake in my description, there are actually three PCB sleepers - one each side of the gap between the wing rails and switch rails, and one under the crossing nose.  This holds all the critical bits in alignment with each other, probably rather better than plastic chairs alone would do.  The photo below hopefully makes this a bit clearer, and also reminds me that I never fitted the "cosmetic" chairs to the wing rails, although I did so on the turnout at the other end of the station. Bit late for that now. Note the PCB gapping - wing rails and crossing nose bonded together, and switch rails bonded to stock rails.



I have built PCB sleeper track and pointwork in EM gauge a long time ago, and also a short section when I dabbled briefly in 2mm FS.  The most important thing is to get the crossing flat and level, and the blades lying snugly against the stock rails.  I filed a small flat on the insides of the stock rails where the blades rest against them.

Richard

 

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