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Author Topic: Sonmel  (Read 40875 times)

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Offline keithbythe sea

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Re: Sonmel
« Reply #690 on: September 24, 2019, 08:30:58 PM »
Thank you for the comments Martin, Weave, David, Laurence and Chris. My concerns with sandpaper (or wet and dry paper) for road construction is not related to the surface texture. It’s more to do with applying it to the model.

My previous attempts have used glue ( cheap and practical UHU in this case) to stick the road to the substructure. The substructure has been either plywood or plaster. On largish flat areas this has worked well, although I have had trouble with adhesion at edges and corners. When making a road, adhesion at the edges has been difficult. This is especially the case with roads in constricted locations ( e.g. up against rock faces). This is made worse when I have then painted the road surface especially if using emulsion or acrylic paint. The tendency is for the road edges to lift.

So, a solution would be to continue to use sandpaper but glue and paint this to a substructure “off layout”. This would allow even pressure to be applied across the road surface as the glue dries to ensure good adhesion. However, this does require pre-planning and may not easily solve the problem with roads in constricted locations. An alternative would be to continue road construction in-situ but develop a road shaped “press” than can be placed onto the road surface to apply even pressure across the whole road whilst the glue dries.

OR, use an alternative approach! I’m going to investigate using either plaster or modelling clay and use something like a wallpaper seam roller to create the road surface. If the surface texture is too smooth, it could  be roughened when set.

I welcome any comments. I will of course update you on progress and degree of success ( or not)!

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: Sonmel
« Reply #691 on: September 24, 2019, 09:09:43 PM »
I am currently using Speedbond to glue the wet and dry down.  I find it works best if I start off by sizing the substrate with weak PVA such as WWS basing glue, but any weak PVA would do.  I just paint it over the surface to be covered a day in advance.  I also use one of metcalfe's tiny droppers to apply the Speedbondond to the back of the wet and dry.  If there are any edges that don't stick down, I use the dropper to insert a little Speedbond under the edge and then press it down.  The Speedbond takes a few minutes to adhere properly and requires repeated pressure with the finger tips.
With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
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Offline dannyboy

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Re: Sonmel
« Reply #692 on: September 24, 2019, 09:10:32 PM »
Rocket Card Glue has numerous uses I have found - not just for sticking paper and card. Could you experiment with 'painting' the Rocket CG onto a surface and then putting your 'road' on to the glue painted surface?  ???. I have used this method for sticking down some card onto the wooden baseboard. The advantage I have found with Rocket CG is that it dries quite quickly so it should be easy enough to get the edges of the 'road' to stick.  Just a(nother) thought.
David.
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Offline Webbo

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Re: Sonmel
« Reply #693 on: September 25, 2019, 08:53:39 AM »
Hi Keith

The texture on real road surfaces would be not more than a a few millimeters unless you have some potholes. Scaled down by 160:1 this texture would be 160 times smaller and would almost disappear. Even fine grained sandpaper would have a texture that is far too large in scale terms. I like the idea of smoothed modelling clay or some such. In my opinion, more important than getting the texture right would be to get the colour variation right considering such things as dark patches where the tyres run or near bumps where the oil drips off the oil pan. I suggest you have a look at what Dats475 does with his roads for inspiration.

Webbo

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: Sonmel
« Reply #694 on: September 25, 2019, 09:26:29 AM »
Just a quick calculation:

P2000 wet and dry has a grit size of approximately 2000 per inch or 80 per mm.  At 2mm to the foot, that is a scale size of of just under 12 per inch, which equates to a 2mm grit size in the road surface.  That is probaly too fine so, for example, for chippings of 10 to 20mm in size, something like P240 would be appropriate.  For 'marzipan' type surfaces, P1000, would be perfectly adequate.
With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
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Offline keithbythe sea

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Re: Sonmel
« Reply #695 on: September 25, 2019, 07:56:30 PM »
Thank you for the comments, David, Laurence and Webbo.

Road surface texture is a bit of a dark art (pun intended), so I’ll leave that to the boys from the black stuff.  :D

Excellent comments Webbo, colour (more precisely, variations of colour) will be much more important than texture. There are some great examples on this forum which I will endeavour to replicate. I’ll post updates on my plaster and modelling clay efforts when I eventually make some progress.

Discussing road construction with Mrs keithbythe sea as we had coffee on the patio she misheard my mention of seam roller. She thought that I had made (another) purchase without her knowing. “So how big is this steam roller that you will be using?”  :uneasy:

Offline port perran

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Re: Sonmel
« Reply #696 on: September 25, 2019, 08:24:58 PM »
On our Bodmin layout the road is twisty and goes uphill between high banks.
My solution was to cut the road shapes out in card (cereal packets).
This took a few attempts to get right because the bank sides were so uneven.
Anyway, once happy with the road shape, I then glued the sandpaper to the card and let it dry overnight squashed between two bits of wood clamped tight together.
This worked ok and I was then able to glue the card/sandpaper to the plaster surface ok.
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline keithbythe sea

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Re: Sonmel
« Reply #697 on: September 26, 2019, 07:01:33 AM »
Ah, yes Martin off-site construction is proven to be a good approach. Of course one can also paint the road off-site and any lifting of the surface can be dealt with easily. An excellent methodology.  :thankyousign:

PS Cereal packets are such a good, free, construction material.  :thumbsup:

Offline chrispearce

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Re: Sonmel
« Reply #698 on: September 26, 2019, 01:17:52 PM »

PS Cereal packets are such a good, free, construction material.  :thumbsup:

Sadly, I don't do cereal so I miss out on this excellent resource. Are the boxes that Twinings herbal/fruit teas come in any good?
Some situations in life are like dairy cows. When you see 'em you just gotta milk 'em.

Offline dannyboy

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Re: Sonmel
« Reply #699 on: September 26, 2019, 03:02:29 PM »
Are the boxes that Twinings herbal/fruit teas come in any good?

They are very good as a base if you are planning a nice smelling allotment  ;)  (Sorry).
David.
I used to be indecisive - now I'm not - I don't think.
If a friend seems distant, catch up with him.

Offline port perran

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Re: Sonmel
« Reply #700 on: September 26, 2019, 05:31:41 PM »

PS Cereal packets are such a good, free, construction material.  :thumbsup:

Sadly, I don't do cereal so I miss out on this excellent resource. Are the boxes that Twinings herbal/fruit teas come in any good?
Maybe a bit on the small side. Although if you cut the end  off they might make a rather nice branch line engine shed  :D
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline chrispearce

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Re: Sonmel
« Reply #701 on: September 26, 2019, 06:03:16 PM »
 :laughabovepost:

Martin, you are the funniest man in Carharrack who owns Trepol Bay.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2019, 06:04:57 PM by chrispearce »
Some situations in life are like dairy cows. When you see 'em you just gotta milk 'em.

Offline keithbythe sea

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Re: Sonmel
« Reply #702 on: October 03, 2019, 03:43:59 PM »
If it doesn't move - paint it

once the plaster is fully dry, it's a coat (or two) of grey matt emulsion.



I've then applied some dark green scatter, stuck down with a 1:1 pva:water mix.





Lots of scenic detailing to complete, but before I do that I need to get that last bridge designed and built.....

Offline Train Waiting

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Re: Sonmel
« Reply #703 on: October 03, 2019, 04:10:50 PM »
Very nice work, Keith.

Best wishes.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

Offline port perran

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Re: Sonmel
« Reply #704 on: October 03, 2019, 04:13:03 PM »
Great work Keith.
I think that the last photo will offer great opportunities to photograph trains in due course.
Martin
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


 

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