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Author Topic: Power supply for LEDs  (Read 751 times)

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Offline daveg

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Power supply for LEDs
« on: January 31, 2014, 10:56:26 PM »
I have around 100 12v warm white, pre-wired LEDs, some of which will be used for buildings and yard lighting.

I plan to install separate bus for the lights. Would this plug-in transformer be OK to use with the LEDs?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Universal-Regulated-600mA-Adaptor-OR-AD600/dp/B0012Y2NMG/ref=pd_sim_sbs_ce_3#productDescription

Would there be a maximum number of LEDS one of these adaptors could run?

Apologies if this has been asked before.

Dave G


Offline martink

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Re: Power supply for LEDs
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2014, 12:06:33 AM »
.... Would this plug-in transformer be OK to use with the LEDs?
Basically yes, that power supply would be fine for your LEDs.  If you wish, you can reduce the brightness of the LEDs by simply selecting one of the lower voltages - try them and find out which looks best.

Quote
.... Would there be a maximum number of LEDS one of these adaptors could run?
That is the catch.  Pre-wired LEDs usually come with a resistor selected to run them at their maximum brightness/current at the specified voltage. At a guess, that would be around 25mA at 12V.  100 of those would add up to 2.5A, while that particular power supply is rated at only a quarter of that (600mA). 

Running the LEDs at a lower voltage will reduce the power requirement, but not enough to solve the problem.  If you chose a higher-power version of  that power supply (the 1.5A one on the same page), that would also be a partial solution.  If you use the high-power unit AND select 7.5V or less, the numbers would then add up.

 

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