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Author Topic: Real imitating models  (Read 168 times)

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Offline BobB

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Real imitating models
« on: September 07, 2019, 02:47:22 AM »
We’re in Bar in Montenegro for a few days, staying in a flat which overlooks the single track railway to the capital (Podgorica) and beyond to Belgrade and all points Europe.

Traveling around I noticed an overbridge separating the marshaling yard from the single track as if it was a purposeful scenic break from the visible railway to the fiddle yard. Perfect for a truly accurate small size layout.

The only problem that came to mind is that most of us have more locomotives and rolling stock than Montenegro possesses !

Online Bealman

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Re: Real imitating models
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2019, 04:10:08 AM »
Any pics?
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline chrism

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Re: Real imitating models
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2019, 06:54:26 AM »
Traveling around I noticed an overbridge separating the marshaling yard from the single track as if it was a purposeful scenic break from the visible railway to the fiddle yard. Perfect for a truly accurate small size layout.

A natural scenic break is indeed very handy, as I quickly discovered when planning Coniston.

The original station site was dug out from the hillside, with a 30' or so cliff and rock wall at the western flank. Above the cliff is a road, flanked by a stone wall, so I put my backscene immediately behind that wall, thereby avoiding any visible gap or join.
At the southern end was (and still is) an overbridge, which conceals the loop around to the yard nicely.
The northern end was wooded so the addition of a few extra trees served the same purpose for hiding  the spur up to the old copper mines - on my model that spur goes around to the fiddle yard so I can a) use it as a roundy-roundy for testing, oops, playing, or b) propel some empty wagons up and later return to draw them down loaded.

I'll have to cheat somewhat more with Torver, Woodland and Broughton though, I think they'll be getting a few more trees than were really there  ;)


Offline crewearpley40

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Re: Real imitating models
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2019, 07:24:41 AM »
alex hailstone knows more about montenegro than i. we also look forward to more on your layout and indeed coniston

 

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