N Gauge Forum

Your Layout and Models => Layout Construction => Topic started by: chrism on December 02, 2018, 07:37:10 PM

Title: Coniston
Post by: chrism on December 02, 2018, 07:37:10 PM
Following on from my introductory post, http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=43622.msg540875#msg540875 (http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=43622.msg540875#msg540875) here's the current state of progress with my little project.

Since my introductory post I've now completed almost all of the tracklaying and initial wiring so now I can start to play conduct exhaustive testing  :no:

In between testing, I really need to pay very strict attention to sorting the rats nest of wires and cables, mostly under the board but some on top for now so I can connect up the controller. I have loomed up the main power feeds and point motor cables but have since added quite a lot of droppers dangling down for inter-board connections, etc.
For the time being, where tracks cross the baseboard joins I've just linked them with standard rail joiners, pending my decision on how I intend to fix the rail ends properly.

Other than sorting the wiring properly and sorting the baseboard joins, the next tasks will be filling in the missing sleepers at the track joints and starting on ballasting.

Here's a piccie of the current state of play, one month on since I ordered the materials and track;
(http://www.f22.org.uk/coniston/Coniston%20layout%202018-12-02.JPG)

This is looking from the station approach end where the line comes up from Foxfield on the Cumbrian Coast line, whilst the far end is a single line up to a slate wharf near the mines.

The Black 5 with two carriages is sitting where the end of platform one will be To the right of that the parallel line is platform two whilst the somewhat wiggly one to the right of that is platform three. That was somewhat tortuously laid in the original, to the extent that operators only used it if there was no choice, but mine's a bit more so at the far end due to limitations in the turnouts available, unfortunately the FR and LMS didn't use Peco turnouts so I've had to make the best fit I can.
The dreaded yellow sticky to the right of the Black 5 is where the signal box will go.

To the left of the Black 5 is the goods yard, the first siding being to the goods shed, the second being general freight with a slate loading wharf at the far end. The third, stubby, one is the cattle landing and the leftmost is the coal yard.

Everything further to the left is the fiddle yard. The uneven spacing of the loops is due to the baseboard joins, across which I needed to avoid laying turnouts. The y-shaped track pointing towards, but not meeting, the goods yard throat is a turning "Y", intended to represent Millom. Locomotives that were too long for the turntable were sent light engine to use the larger table there. Although the end of the "Y" appears close to the goods yard it will be more than adequately concealed by the 30' bank that runs close along the edge of the yard.

In the immediate foreground is the one area I haven't fixed the track down, the loco yard, because I haven't yet decided how I want to do the turntable so I don't want to fix the track and restrict my options for that.

The "ledge" framing at the front is to allow me to build the banking and retaining walls that form the eastern boundary of the site, whilst the hole at the far end  is because the station vehicular approach slopes up from below track level, the narrow strip of trackbed under the furthest turnout being the bridge over Station Road.

This ledge is proving handy during testing, I've currently got all the point motor cables pinned along it - although it'll be a lot easier to operate them when I get the control panel built. It's a bit like playing a demented piano at present  :D

All in all, pretty satisfactory progress for the first month but I doubt that it'll be as fast from here on in.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Newportnobby on December 02, 2018, 07:50:28 PM
Thanks for the update, Chris. Some rapid progress being made and a pic always helps us see what you're at. I'll give it a few posts to see if anyone comments on one of my pet worries before I say anything (how about that for being enigmatic?)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: exmouthcraig on December 02, 2018, 08:01:03 PM
Wish mine had progressed that much in a month Chris 🤞over Christmas will go well for me.

Looking good, I reckon Mick might be concerned about how close to the board edge that curve is?????

Good luck with progress

Craig
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on December 02, 2018, 08:05:02 PM
Thank you for the update, Chris.  It sure looks like Coniston to me.

Thanks for the update, Chris. Some rapid progress being made and a pic always helps us see what you're at. I'll give it a few posts to see if anyone comments on one of my pet worries before I say anything (how about that for being enigmatic?

Perchance a train ending up in Coniston Water, NPN?

Great to see a Furness line in 'N'.

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: port perran on December 02, 2018, 08:09:44 PM
Looking good to me.
I canít think what NN is so worried about  :doh:
But yes, I do think some of that track is precariously close to the edge. You just canít trust those N gauge trains not to take an unexpected leap of faith.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on December 02, 2018, 08:26:08 PM
Thank you for the update, Chris.  It sure looks like Coniston to me.

Thanks for the update, Chris. Some rapid progress being made and a pic always helps us see what you're at. I'll give it a few posts to see if anyone comments on one of my pet worries before I say anything (how about that for being enigmatic?

Perchance a train ending up in Coniston Water, NPN?


It'd have to be going a a hell of a lick - Coniston Waters' about half a mile away  :no:

I'm not too concerned about the closeness to the edge, because it'll be contained by the sides of the scenery or, failing that, I'll put "catch fencing" in.

The eastern edge of the station is fenced along the top of the bank - I'll make sure I make that fence functional as well as visual so it'll catch any errant stock, which won't be travelling at any great speed anyway.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Portpatrick on December 02, 2018, 09:17:39 PM
Wow.  All that in a month!  How long in the planning?  I can certainly recognise the track plan.  I guess the fiddle yard loops are long enough, at least for the traffic the line really carried.  I appreciate why you have added the triangle.  My own inclination would be to turn locos by hand and use the freed up space to develop the scenery.  But it is your layout, and the comment is made in that spirit

Years ago, I had vague ideas of using the location if not the full plan as the basis for a model.  From memory I think I was going to do a "just supposing" to continue the line towards Elterwater and/or Ambleside to connect with another theoretical line from Windermere to Keswick via Grasmere.  In the end I turned my attention to the western end of North Wales and built 2 successive termini on that theme - one, Abersoch being on the exhibition circuit for a some  years including Aly Paly in 2001.

Have you seen the booklet  "The Coniston Railway" published by the Cumbrian Railway Association some years ago?  It may be available somewhere.  Worth finding if you have not seen it.  It also appeared in the Railway Modeller as Prototype Station Plans in Sept 1962.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on December 02, 2018, 09:22:54 PM


a quick search

"The Coniston Railway" published by the Cumbrian Railway Association


shows

https://www.abebooks.co.uk/book-search/title/the-coniston-railway/ (https://www.abebooks.co.uk/book-search/title/the-coniston-railway/) where to buy

http://www.cumbrianrailways.org.uk/books.html (http://www.cumbrianrailways.org.uk/books.html)

waterstones
amazon

all interesting and i was thinking of paying a long overdue visit to the lakes next year, any library may help
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on December 02, 2018, 09:34:13 PM
Wow.  All that in a month!  How long in the planning? 

About another month tops  :D

Quote
I can certainly recognise the track plan.  I guess the fiddle yard loops are long enough, at least for the traffic the line really carried.

Should be more than adequate, I think.

Quote
I appreciate why you have added the triangle.  My own inclination would be to turn locos by hand and use the freed up space to develop the scenery. 

All scenery behind the station area just goes up, and up, and up  :D
Might as well make use of the space below it.

Quote
Years ago, I had vague ideas of using the location if not the full plan as the basis for a model.  From memory I think I was going to do a "just supposing" to continue the line towards Elterwater

There was actually a plan to do that - but it was never built.

Quote
Have you seen the booklet  "The Coniston Railway" published by the Cumbrian Railway Association some years ago? 

Hehe, where do you think I got the idea  :bounce:

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Newportnobby on December 03, 2018, 10:17:24 AM

I'm not too concerned about the closeness to the edge, because it'll be contained by the sides of the scenery or, failing that, I'll put "catch fencing" in.

The eastern edge of the station is fenced along the top of the bank - I'll make sure I make that fence functional as well as visual so it'll catch any errant stock, which won't be travelling at any great speed anyway.

Glad to see you have already taken it into account. As you can see from various comments (and having dropped a class 37) I have a reputation for worrying about it :angel:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on December 03, 2018, 11:14:11 AM
and having dropped a class 37

At least they don't have side rods to bend,  just buffers and steps to break off - and bogies, I guess, if one's really unlucky.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Newportnobby on December 03, 2018, 11:32:28 AM
and having dropped a class 37

At least they don't have side rods to bend,  just buffers and steps to break off - and bogies, I guess, if one's really unlucky.

But diseasels only make up about 52% of my loco fleet, Chris (soon to be redressed with the addition of at least one BR GWR Mogul ex DJ Models and at least one RevolutioN/Sonic class 56xx :D). I just caught the 37 with a jumper cuff. Not done it since!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: lil chris on December 03, 2018, 09:04:42 PM
Nice start to the layout, I like the plan all you can want for interesting running. Look forward to watching your progress.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Shropshire Lad on December 03, 2018, 09:39:56 PM
Great progress! Looks good. I take it you've worked out some switching or a return loop unit, if using DCC, for the Y.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on December 04, 2018, 07:17:23 AM
I like the plan all you can want for interesting running.

Certainly is - I've counted no less than ten alternative pathways from one end of the station to the other.
Eleven for a short loco if you include reversing up the headshunt, forward onto the turntable, round on the table and out through the loco shed  ;)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on December 04, 2018, 07:21:08 AM
Great progress! Looks good. I take it you've worked out some switching or a return loop unit, if using DCC, for the Y.

I'm not using DCC, but I will have a DPDT switch for the Y section. I might well bung in an LED or two on the control panel to indicate whether or not the switch setting is correct for the points' settings - saves getting a loco stopping on entry or exit because the polarities don't match.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on February 03, 2019, 10:14:33 PM
Well, another two months has gone by so I guess it's time for  a progress update. Time has been rather more limited than in my first month because I'm a volunteer driver for the community transport scheme and since my last update someone seems to have spread the word about it because I've had lots of requests to drive people around. Anyway, that's enough of the excuses ;)

Since my last update I have;

1) Tamed the rat's nest of wiring to feed to an array of D-sub plugs/sockets and cables to a control box with a mimic panel on top. I've doubled up the plugs sockets so that the control panel can be fitted to either the front or back of the layout. All the point motor wires go to studs on the control panel and all appear to be working properly now - several have needed some adjustments but seem OK now.

2) I've replaced one point because I decided I didn't like my original choice. At the far end of platform 3 the point for the running round loop is supposed to be curved so I used a Peco double radius point. Unfortunately, the smaller radius was really too small so, although the curve around the loop was just right  I ended up with an unpleasant s-bend at the start of the platform road and where the platform end will be. So I decided to take the hit and have a short straight in what should be a curve all the way around the loop in order to have a more attractive curve into and through the platform road.

3) I've also installed Gaugemaster uncoupling solenoids in as many locations as I anticipate and using as many spare pins I had available on the plugs/sockets - apart from four which Amazon claim to be delivering on Wednesday. I've put one each at the North end of all three platforms, one each at the North end of the four longest fiddle yard roads (leaving the fifth purely as a running round loop), one each in the shorter goods yard sidings and two each in the longer ones. That should suffice for my needs, if I need to do more I'll resort to the giant toothpick from the sky because I've run out of spare pins in the connectors now - unless I try doubling up and working two solenoids off one switch.
I wasn't impressed with the pushbuttons that came with the solenoids. They didn't seem to have much tolerance to the heat of the soldering iron before the plastic bodies softened enough to dislodge the contacts, so I've gone for SPST sprung toggle switches instead.

4) The thing with which I'm most chuffed is that I now have a working turntable so the loco yard track is
now fixed down and wired. The TT is powered by a small motor and metal geared worm gearbox from the Bay of E. It is supposedly a max speed of 10rpm but will move much slower than that. I've wired it in so it can be powered from either of the two controllers and it will turn slowly enough that lining up the track by eye is not too difficult. Power is fed to the track by means of a slip ring on the driveshaft. I've done the polarity reversing by means of a rotor under the pit with a small magnet on the end and four reed switches. when the switches close they trip a latching relay wired up as a DPDT crossover switch, which works a treat.
Before anyone asks why I made the turntable instead of just buying one, the answer is that all the commercially available ones I found were 70' jobs and I needed a 42' one. I'd have had to expend just as much effort modifying one as I have in building from scratch - and probably wouldn't have had such fun ;)

5) Having found that an unexpected gradient on the layout was neither the baseboards nor the  table on which I stand them but the flipping bedroom floor, I've sorted adjustable legs on which to stand the table. I wanted more strength and adjustment capacity than most that I could find at an acceptable price, so I've adapted some small scaffolding tower adjustable feet, which a) give me the baseboard height I want and b) give me more  adjustment than I'm ever likely to need.

Newportnobby will, I'm sure, be relieved to hear that I've had no nasty "off" moments at the board edges, despite exhaustive playing testing, although as I said before I will ultimately be having scenery or catch fences "just in case". I've actually been very pleasantly surprised at how good the roadholding of n-gauge stock seems to be. The bigger annoyance is the Peco couplings which don't seem to tolerate much of a bump - even the bump of a short wheelbase wagon on a crossing nose seems to be enough to make them uncouple sometimes. I think it's the wagons bouncing that's doing it so I'll try adding a little weight to hold the wagons down more.

As per my reply to Shropshire Lad, I have put a DPDT switch in for the reversing wye, which is working a treat. I've done a prototype circuit to give me a polarity mismatch warning indicator which I'll include when I do all the point direction indicators. The latter will all use a latching relay to switch on one of two LEDs in the mimic panel and the reversing wye will have a slightly modified circuit. I'm using a quad-pole double throw switch for the wye, two poles of which are the track power crossover switch and the other two poles will combine with the latching relay for the point indicators to turn a bi-colour LED from red to green if, and only if, the polarity switch is set the correct way for the point direction. All the relay circuits are a "fill in job" at present as I've got quite a lot of them to do so I'm doing a few at a time.

My main current job is making transport casings for the three boards so that they can be protected from damage (especially the track where it crosses the board joins) before even being removed from the table and so that they can be stored safely or stacked in the car when I take the layout down to the club. This is a fairly high priority because as the weather improves and the days get longer I'm likely to have friends/relatives wanting to use the spare room, which means the layout will have to be temporarily evicted from time to time.

I had previously said that the next job will be ballasting - but it won't ;)

The next job will, on current plans, be to start on the basic scenery structure, which will be carved lumps of Kingspan/Celotex type insulation board let into and/or glued to the baseboards.

I took a trip up to Coniston with the camera a couple of weeks ago to see how much of the terrain remains and how much I would have to guess. I was very pleasantly surprised to find that all the terrain is largely unchanged, the developers just used the large flat area on which to build and left the rest, as far as I could see, "as was".  The only change I could see was debris netting on the cliff face above where the coal siding was. There's even one original building, the slate office, still there so I'll be going back sometime to wave my tape measure over that and take more photos of it. Most of the slate wharf is still there too, half of it now being a car park.

After doing the basic terrain I still won't be doing the ballasting - got to do the point rodding first, and probably the platforms too, so that I don't have to dig up ballast to fit those. The platforms will have to be removable, I think, because they cross a baseboard join. It'll look better if I have them (and the main station building) located on pegs and with no joins to try and hide - if anything, they'll help to hide the baseboard join with a bit of luck.

No piccies this time, there's not enough visual progress to show, I'll do some once the basic terrain is well on the way - even if it will look like it has been the last few days, covered in snow ;)

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on February 04, 2019, 08:56:17 AM
Sounds like excellent progress.  This will be a lovely layout.

Many thanks for the interesting update.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: port perran on February 04, 2019, 12:20:36 PM
Very much looking forward to seeing the fruits of your labours.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Newportnobby on February 04, 2019, 01:31:49 PM
Good to hear you've had no 'plungers' :D
As for the Elsie couplings, I find a dab of 'Tacky Wax' generally prevents random uncoupling.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on February 04, 2019, 02:23:25 PM
Sounds like excellent progress.  This will be a lovely layout.

Many thanks for the interesting update.

John

Thanks, John. I certainly hope it will be but I'm under no illusions other than there's a long way to go - and a lot more to learn.
It's been quite a learning curve so far - having never worked in N-gauge before, never tried to make a portable (well, luggable) layout, never used point motors, never used a control panel, etc., etc.
Still to come is the never-done-before point rodding, never-done-before ballasting, never-done-before carved polystyrene terrain, etc., etc. All good fun though.

Very much looking forward to seeing the fruits of your labours.

Thanks, as soon as I have some visual changes worth photographing I will do so.

Good to hear you've had no 'plungers' :D

None whatsoever - although we nearly had one at the club a couple of weeks ago. We have an OO layout under construction that will be intended for youngster to simply come and play on a "run what you brung" basis. At the front edge is a point that will be able to lead to a separate yard and one of the guys was testing/showing off his new 66. He put it on the track, checked that it ran then wound it up to full speed - without having checked the settings of the points. Luckily I was in position in first slip so had we not realised in time that the point was set for the plunge off the edge I should have been able to catch it ;)

Quote
As for the Elsie couplings, I find a dab of 'Tacky Wax' generally prevents random uncoupling.

Thanks for that, I'd never heard of it before but will get hold of some sometime. The worst are the Peco Elsies, but my oldest Farish carriages could use it as well. Their couplings are part of the bogie moulding, just sitting on the end of a swan-neck plastic "spring" arrangement, and they are also prone to uncoupling themselves randomly. All the new Farish stock with sprung couplings seem fine, as do the Dapol wagons I have.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on February 18, 2019, 12:42:22 PM
Another update, with a couple of piccies before I take it all apart since the next few jobs need the three baseboards to be separated and it may be a month or two before it all goes back together again. Apologies for the awful lighting. There's only a window at  one end of the room and nothing at the other, and it's not helped by much of the scenery in its current state being white but it gives an idea of what it'll look like. When it's more worth getting decent pics I'll sort out better lighting.

Since the last update, I've started on the scenery behind the station, made the foundations for the cattle dock and slate wharf and made the edges of the station platforms.

The scenery behind the goods yard  is rough hewn polystyrene and will become rough hewn slate with a liberal amount of vegetation growing on it - so there's little more to do than a bit of trimming, paint it and plant loads of suitable "foliage". Behind the southern end needs a little more work because that will be a vegetated slope with a slate retaining wall above whilst the northern end, behind the slate wharf and approach road, needs a lot more work. That needs to be more of a hilly area with two roads cut through it and a load of trees on top. Before I can do that area, I need to take the baseboards apart so that I can inset a block of polystyrene in the hole, carve it to represent the area that is below track level and blend it into the landscape above track level.

Conveniently, all the rough hewn slate above the goods yard and the area to the south are topped with a slate wall separating the drop from a small road serving the houses above the station. This will form an ideal way to conceal the join between scenery and backdrop - I'll include the wall in the scenery and fit the backdrop just behind that. At the northern end it's all (or mostly) tree-covered so the trees will hide the join there too. No, the backdrop won't be sheets of white card just propped against the scenery, as shown in the piccies, I put those in to give me a feel for how high it needs to be.
I'm hoping to find a suitable vantage point on the other side of the valley to take a photograph of the site which, when edited and scaled, I can use for the backdrop. Hopefully I'll be able to get it printed onto a roll of canvas in one length so I can avoid visible joins and also just roll it up for transport.

The platform edges are strips of plywood bent to shape and glued down, which was easier than trying to cut perfect curves to match the track. In retrospect I should have picked any of the other stations along the line, as well as simpler track layouts they had straight platforms  ;)
The platform edges as fitted are slightly low and slightly too far from the track, leaving me room to add the facings and top surfaces later. I decided to fix the platforms down rather than make them removable so I can be sure of trains fitting through them. That will give me one baseboard join to hide but the station building and train shed will deal with platforms 1 & 2 and I'm sure I can contrive a group of people and/or a pile of luggage to do likewise on the bit of platform 3 on which the join will show. The station building and train shed will still be removable, though. I'm not going to try and make that in two sections and hide the join - besides which it may be too tall to fit inside the transport casings, the heights of which are dictated by the available height inside my car.

I haven't done much with the scenery at the eastern side (the front of the layout when viewing it) yet, just cut some polystyrene blocks to fit the spaces I'd left. They will need quite a bit of "mining" to create the correct terrain profiles so I've ordered a hot wire cutter to make that job easier. A carving knife worked well (albeit, messily) for the convex shapes at the back but isn't so good for concave ones as will be needed at the front. There needs to be a road down from the overbridge at the southern end, a section below a slate retaining wall from there to about halfway along for a footpath and the locations for houses, then a wooded slope before the road leading up to and through the underbridge at the north end.



This is from the north-east showing the station approach and goods yard.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/7182-180219102421.jpeg)

This is from the south-eastern end showing the whole thing.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/7182-180219102448.jpeg)

It's obviously a busy time at the station - we have a Jubilee coming in with an excursion from Blackpool whilst a Fairburn tank is waiting to take the branch passenger service off to Foxfield and a 4F is waiting in the yard to depart with a goods train. The Jubilee must be required for other duties since there's a Black 5 waiting, in the road behind where the signal box will be, to take the excursion back later. The 3F Jinty on the turntable is propelling a fresh wagon of coal to where the coaling stage at the end of the loco shed will be, whilst the "not a Jinty" 0-6-0 is parked where inside the loco shed will be.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Newportnobby on February 18, 2019, 12:59:40 PM
Thanks for the update. I can see this being a cracker of a layout, especially as I'm a sucker for curved platforms.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: paulprice on February 18, 2019, 01:28:40 PM
I brilliant to see another LMS modeller on here I thought I was the only one :(

Great layout by the way :)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on February 18, 2019, 08:45:50 PM
Many thanks for the update.  I really enjoy reading about Coniston.

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: port perran on February 18, 2019, 08:50:27 PM
Thanks for the update.
This is coming along very nicely and I look forward to the next instalment.
I like the touch with the Camberwick Green wagons in the background.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on February 19, 2019, 07:27:02 AM
Thanks for the encouragement, guys. I'm not displeased with the state of progress although it's got to the stage where there are lots of things to do and at times I can't decide which to do next - so I'm jumping around between the tasks and doing a bit of each, then  a bit of another, then back to the first, etc. Saves me getting bored  :D

especially as I'm a sucker for curved platforms.

I'm not so averse to them now I've found that it's easier to bend and fix thin strips to the correct shape than to cut the edges of a wide piece, especially for an island platform and concave curves.

I brilliant to see another LMS modeller on here I thought I was the only one :(

I have to confess that modelling LMS is more incidental than planned. Had I picked up where I left off 40 years ago my locos would be in middle chrome green with chocolate & cream coaches, whereas if I'd followed on from my time working on the Watercress Line the locos would be sage green, holly green, olive green or malachite green with similar colour coaches depending on the timeframe

However, I decided to do Coniston because a) it's fairly local to me,  b) it's an interesting station layout and c) I found a detailed track plan in a book about the Coniston Railway.
 
Once the location was decided, the operator and timeframe was decided by a) there's little, if any, ready to run Furness Railway stock available and b) I don't like the almost flat replacement loco shed roof that was fitted after they had a fire during WWII. That eliminated FR and BR, only leaving LMS.

Therefore, it's intended to be LMS, just pre-war - although I am aware that a Fairburn tank doesn't fit in that timeframe but I like them so what the heck  ;)

I like the touch with the Camberwick Green wagons in the background.

Hehe, I saw those on the forums and couldn't resist asking Robbie if he could make a set for me too.
Once loaded they can be the coal yard wagons and free up my LMS open wagons for the slate traffic, with a couple kept back for the loco yard coal and ash wagons.


Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Portpatrick on February 19, 2019, 03:02:28 PM
Looking brilliant
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on March 05, 2019, 06:08:00 PM
Well, I've been busy since the last update (again) and since it's a nice bright afternoon with plenty of light permeating right to the back of the room, I thought I'd rattle off a piccie since the layout's changed rather a lot since last time.

Over the last fortnight, I've mostly been "mining" and created the basic scenery to the east side of the station, the viewing side of the layout. Having done that, I decided to paint it since I always find it easier to spot blemishes when the colour is uniform, rather than a mix of the base material and filler, so I decided to paint it in approximately the finished colour scheme so that I, and others, can begin to get a feel for what the finished thing will look like.

I can, therefore, present what in comparison to the last update is Coniston after the snow has thawed ;-)


(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/7182-050319165221.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=74716)

After quite a bit of filling/sanding/filling/sanding again, I'm pretty happy now with the hills for the foreground. They don't look even but this is in the middle of the Lake District fells, you just don't get nice smooth surfaces except in well-tended gardens, so I've concentrated on making sure there are no obviously unnatural blemishes (holes, straight edges, etc.) except where they'll be covered by foliage anyway. The whole lot will be getting a dose of flock or static grass so that'll smooth minor blemishes out a bit as well. The eagle-eyed observers will have noticed that I haven't matched up the baseboard joins yet - that's the next job on the list.

The mismatches are accentuated anyway because the baseboards aren't actually joined together at present, just pushed up against each other, which also explains the "steps" in the platforms and, worse, the rails. That is, also, why there aren't any trains in sight.

The boards are separated at present because, apart from doing the scenery below the track level, which needed access from underneath, I've also been working on the transport casings, having measured to ascertain what overall height I can fit in the car, because that dictated how high I could make the background scenery - the odd-looking timber framework in the background is the gauge I made to see precisely how much height I had to play with.

While the boards are apart I'm also finishing off the tracks at the baseboard joins, securing the rail ends at last. The transport casings are designed to protect the rails anyway, by having a 3mm layer of plywood on the inside face below track level so there is that gap between the rail ends and the rest of the casings and the boards won't be moved around without the casings in place. The idea is that the #bards are lifted onto the table before the casings between two boards are removed, then the boards are simply slid against each other, so there is little scope for bashing the rails ends. Likewise, when taking it apart, the boards are detached and slid apart, then the casings go on before the boards are lifted at all.
In view of that, I'm not bothering with either screws to which the rails are soldered nor with copper clad "sleepers", neither of which I find look particularly good. I'm simply fitting additional sleepers to fill the spaces where I had temporary rail joiners and liberally flooding the ends with the gap-filling superglue I used to hold the track down, thus the sleepers are glued to the baseboard and the rails to the sleepers. The "surplus" glue will be covered with ballast anyway. I had thought of using epoxy resin but this superglue is fantastic stuff - the only way to separate things stuck together with it is to destroy at least one side of the join.

The roads/paths are as yet just painted on to show the positioning of them, when I do them properly I expect I'll do them using fine grade emery paper to give both colour and texture - I'm pretty sure that by the late 1930s they would have been tarmacced so I ought to be safe enough doing that.
However, I'm unsure what to do about the station approach and goods yard. All the photos I've found are not clear enough to determine whether it should be tarmac or gravel - considering the location it might well have been crushed slate in the yard, in which case I'll probably use sandpaper but give it an appropriate grey colour wash.

The platforms are just painted black for now, but they will ultimately have stone slab edges and slabs over the entire width under the train shed, with gravel infill along the rest of the platforms - I'll represent the gravel with sandpaper and the slabs with, I hope, suitable coloured card which should give a little texture and avoid the need to paint both the surfaces and edges of a large number of tiny slabs in an alternative material.

The hole in the hill at the back, just to the left of the nearer baseboard join is intentional, it's the foundations for the slate office. The odd-looking "shelf" running from in front of the turntable to halfway along the front is a footpath running below the station site retaining wall, with a further walled drop below it. That aspect of it will be tidied up when I've photographed some suitable walls and turned them into something printable.

The hill in the immediate foreground, sloping down to the access road, will be wooded. The trees and associated undergrowth should hide the baseboard join well, although I'll make it pretty darned close a join anyway, only relying on the foliage to hide the actual straight edge. Likewise, the hill at the back between the slate cliffs to the left and the roads to the right. The left hand road is the one that runs up to and across the top of the cliffs, whilst the right hand one continues up the fells - in both cases the join between road and backdrop should be concealed by trees, etc.

The first half of the ground below the path, as well as the area between the track and the road beyond the turntable should contain houses but for the initial build I'll do those areas as grazing land enclosed with walls, suitably populated with Herdwicks, the local sheep breed.
My work will be cut out quite sufficiently making the railway buildings, especially the station building, goods shed and train shed for which I have no drawings, so I'll leave non-railway buildings  for much (much) later.

Once the baseboard scenery and track joins are completed, I can start on the first really fiddly job - the point rodding, because I need to do that before the ballasting. I intend to make the rodding from 0.2mm spring steel wire on carriers made from plastikard. Not sure yet what I'll use for the cranks, possibly some slightly thicker wire. That'll keep me out of trouble for some time, especially as the garden is growing now and will need quite a bit of my time too.



 

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on March 05, 2019, 06:46:19 PM
Thank you very much for this informative and detailed post.

Great progress!

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on March 08, 2019, 12:01:46 PM
Cheers, John.

I'm getting there - gradually ;)

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on March 13, 2019, 08:15:42 PM
Glad I found this thread, spent a number of good times up at Coniston including proposing to my wife up in the Coppermines valley up beyond the station (we were aiming for the top of the Old Man, but it was October 2008, that weekend they were winching fell runners off the fells so we didn't get very far!

I considered Coniston as my own layout but chose lakeside as I wanted the steamers on there and in the end built neither (I blame the wife, progress stopped when we met!)

Looking forwards to seeing progress, with regards locomotive options, have you had a look at what Union Mills produces, he makes a few LMS and LNWR locos (3F and G2 spring to mind) while not being Furness locos, it may expand options for your fleet.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on March 14, 2019, 08:19:30 AM
Glad I found this thread, spent a number of good times up at Coniston including proposing to my wife up in the Coppermines valley up beyond the station (we were aiming for the top of the Old Man, but it was October 2008, that weekend they were winching fell runners off the fells so we didn't get very far!

Was that the weekend that the Mountain Marathon was abandoned, with hundreds of competitors taking shelter at Honister? If so, I was driving back from west Scotland that day - it wasn't until I got close to Glasgow that I was able to be sure that I was definitely driving on roads rather than river beds. A horrendous journey.

Quote
Looking forwards to seeing progress, with regards locomotive options, have you had a look at what Union Mills produces, he makes a few LMS and LNWR locos (3F and G2 spring to mind) while not being Furness locos, it may expand options for your fleet.

I have a 3F now, the new Farish one - it was quite an eyeopener to compare it with the old Farish general purpose 0-6-0 tank and to see how wrong that is for a Jinty.
I did consider the G2 but I doubt that they went to Coniston - either through route availability restrictions or simply that the volume of traffic wouldn't justify sending one. The Black 5's (and at least one Jubilee) only turned up there because they were hauling tourist specials from Blackpool.

The current state of progress is that I've sorted the board joins now, both on the scenery and the missing sleepers at the track ends and I've now had to take the layout apart and convert the room back from a workshop to a bedroom pending the arrival of visitors who, for some reason, want a bed with some room above to sleep on rather than trying to limbo dance under a model railway  :no:

However, until they arrive work has not stopped since I can lay one board at a time out in another room so I can start on what is going to be my first real eye-straining task - the point rodding. I've seen some fantastic jobs done by other members, on Wrenton in particular.

However, I'm not too keen on using wire for the rods if I can avoid it, it just doesn't look right for inverted U-channel rods as used at Coniston. Also, on some I've seen which although they do look good, the wire used and/or the spacing appears somewhat over scale - particularly since I need to run 8 rods through the tight space  between the turntable and the adjacent track.

So, for my first try, I'm going to make the stools from 2mm x 1mm plastikard strips stood on plinths of more 2mm x 1mm with 0.3mm square plastikard rods on top of them, all topped off with a length of 0.2mm wire across the top to represent the upper rollers and tops of the stools. 0.3mm is, I think, still a bit over scale (about 50% too thick) for the rods but ought to be close enough and still workable with a strong pair of specs.

If that doesn't work or I deem it to be too flimsy or not looking right , then I'll use the 0.2mm wire for the rods as well.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on March 14, 2019, 10:25:03 AM
Ah, not the Fowler 3F 0-6-0T Jinty, but the Johnson 3F which is quite similar in appearance to the Fowler 4F 0-6-0

There's a few others he has produced and likely to do as batches in the future (price new is about £60-£80 so don't pay too much second hand)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on March 14, 2019, 10:42:33 AM
Ah, not the Fowler 3F 0-6-0T Jinty, but the Johnson 3F which is quite similar in appearance to the Fowler 4F 0-6-0

Ah right, I wasn't aware of that one. My LMS and predeessors knowledge is still building, my "history" is GWR when I was  last modelling about 40 years ago and SR/LSWR from when I was a volunteer on the Watercress line for part of the intervening period.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on March 14, 2019, 10:48:42 AM
I've picked up a fair bit of info over the past couple of years, Milliedale On Sea (my current 'layout') is claimed to be an ex LNWR and ex MR on Morcambe bay.

I'm currently compiling info to create a push pull unit from old Farish coaches if that's of any use to you when I get that far? (can't remember what used to run on the Coniston branch)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on March 14, 2019, 11:18:32 AM
I've picked up a fair bit of info over the past couple of years, Milliedale On Sea (my current 'layout') is claimed to be an ex LNWR and ex MR on Morcambe bay.

I'm currently compiling info to create a push pull unit from old Farish coaches if that's of any use to you when I get that far? (can't remember what used to run on the Coniston branch)

As far as I can see from the books I have, they did use a push-pull set operated using ex-L&Y Aspinall 2-4-2s or Ivatt 2MTs, but they also used non push-pull sets as well and other locos may have operated the push-pull at times. Thee are photos of Jinties on passenger stock, presumably not push-pull because the loco is at the Foxfield end of the train.

The FR steam railmotor with trailer car was retired around the time of WWI so I don't need to worry about that and the only diseasels were a short-lived trial with AEC DMUs in the mid-fifties (after my timescale) which couldn't cope with the gradients and the MetroVic Co-B os that operated the wrecking trains after closure - and I'm definitely not modelling that period  :D

Even the Blackpool excursions got a variety of locos, frequently Black 5's but a Jubilee was used at least once and one of the books has a photo captioned as a Fowler 2-6-2 with the Blackpool corridor train - it would take the train as far as Ulverston where something else would take it on to Blackpool.

My current fleet comprises a Black 5 and a Jubilee which, with all or part of a 6-car rake of Stanier coaches, can be the Blackpool excursions, a Fowler 4F which (although probably not prototypical for the line) can handle some of the freight, a Jinty and a Farish general purpose 0-6-0T which can handle either freight or a local train of three older Farish LMS coaches, possibly suburban stock in reality, and a Fairburn 2-6-4  4MT which, although actually outside my timescale but I like the look of them, can have a go at any of the operations. That lot will do for now, when I've got the layout done I can consider having a bash at making other locos, or acquiring them.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Newportnobby on March 14, 2019, 11:37:20 AM
Using this wonderful resource and by clicking 'Sites' then 'Depots' you could find the nearest depot to your modelled area and if you click on it and then 'Locos Allocated' you'll end up with a really useful list of locos you could use................

 http://www.brdatabase.info/index.php (http://www.brdatabase.info/index.php)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on March 14, 2019, 11:37:57 AM
I heard rumours that Dapol are going to do another release of the Ivatt tank engine, I bought one about 9 years ago when I was still planning on building Lakeside, it's run so badly that I've never been able to reliably run it or been happy to sell it in it's condition!

I'm guessing there was a change of loco to meet weight restrictions?
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on March 14, 2019, 11:59:58 AM
Using this wonderful resource and by clicking 'Sites' then 'Depots' you could find the nearest depot to your modelled area and if you click on it and then 'Locos Allocated' you'll end up with a really useful list of locos you could use................

 [url]http://www.brdatabase.info/index.php[/url] ([url]http://www.brdatabase.info/index.php[/url])


Thanks, that is certainly an interesting resource. Unfortunately, the only pre-WWII allocation it has for Barrow-in-Furness was a Stanier 6P5F mogul for about ten weeks in 1937, so I'll still have to "wing it" and assume that some of the other types were there before the war just not listed.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on March 14, 2019, 12:12:19 PM
I heard rumours that Dapol are going to do another release of the Ivatt tank engine, I bought one about 9 years ago when I was still planning on building Lakeside, it's run so badly that I've never been able to reliably run it or been happy to sell it in it's condition!

I'm in no hurry, I'll just keep my eyes open. I did look at an Ivatt 2-6-0 2MT on fleabay but the seller wants too much for it - £90 unboxed second-hand when one can pick up an, albeit in BR livery, new one for under £100.

Quote
I'm guessing there was a change of loco to meet weight restrictions?

The Fowler 2-6-2 only going to Ulverston?
Could be, but Black 5s and at least one Jubilee went all the way to Coniston. It could have been that the original loco bringing the train from Blackpool failed or was required for other duties, it could be that the return train was intended to be tacked onto another coming from Barrow or further up the coast.
The caption does say that that particular Fowler spent most of its time as the Barrow Central pilot, so a train engine failure sounds very possible.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on March 14, 2019, 01:01:24 PM

I'm in no hurry, I'll just keep my eyes open. I did look at an Ivatt 2-6-0 2MT on fleabay but the seller wants too much for it - £90 unboxed second-hand when one can pick up an, albeit in BR livery, new one for under £100.

Quote
I'm guessing there was a change of loco to meet weight restrictions?

The Fowler 2-6-2 only going to Ulverston?
Could be, but Black 5s and at least one Jubilee went all the way to Coniston. It could have been that the original loco bringing the train from Blackpool failed or was required for other duties, it could be that the return train was intended to be tacked onto another coming from Barrow or further up the coast.
The caption does say that that particular Fowler spent most of its time as the Barrow Central pilot, so a train engine failure sounds very possible.

re-liverying from BR into LMS isn't that hard as the M usually covers where the BR crest was so any marks made in removing (T-cut and blunt cocktail stick being the preferred way) are covered over and you can be lazy with the smokebox door number and just remove the 4 from the front :D

summer specials could have all manner of rolling stock and locos on them simply based on what was available, 4F's weren't uncommon I'm told taking day trippers from the mill towns of Yorkshire and Lancashire to the coast for the day.

I'm modelling 1947, I've got a 2P and might find a 4P at some time to represent the use of older locos for tourist traffic
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: paulprice on March 14, 2019, 03:05:24 PM
Using this wonderful resource and by clicking 'Sites' then 'Depots' you could find the nearest depot to your modelled area and if you click on it and then 'Locos Allocated' you'll end up with a really useful list of locos you could use................

 [url]http://www.brdatabase.info/index.php[/url] ([url]http://www.brdatabase.info/index.php[/url])


Thanks, that is certainly an interesting resource. Unfortunately, the only pre-WWII allocation it has for Barrow-in-Furness was a Stanier 6P5F mogul for about ten weeks in 1937, so I'll still have to "wing it" and assume that some of the other types were there before the war just not listed.


ive nearly finished a Stanier Mogul (its nearly two years old) if I can do it anyone can :)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on March 14, 2019, 06:13:55 PM
ive nearly finished a Stanier Mogul (its nearly two years old) if I can do it anyone can :)

You keep telling me this, but I'm not sure I believe you yet!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: paulprice on March 14, 2019, 06:41:02 PM
ive nearly finished a Stanier Mogul (its nearly two years old) if I can do it anyone can :)

You keep telling me this, but I'm not sure I believe you yet!

What are you trying to say? :angel:
Title: Re: Coniston - Point Rodding plan A .... fail
Post by: chrism on March 15, 2019, 02:49:27 PM
so I can start on what is going to be my first real eye-straining task - the point rodding. I've seen some fantastic jobs done by other members, on Wrenton in particular.

However, I'm not too keen on using wire for the rods if I can avoid it, it just doesn't look right for inverted U-channel rods as used at Coniston. Also, on some I've seen which although they do look good, the wire used and/or the spacing appears somewhat over scale - particularly since I need to run 8 rods through the tight space  between the turntable and the adjacent track.

So, for my first try, I'm going to make the stools from 2mm x 1mm plastikard strips stood on plinths of more 2mm x 1mm with 0.3mm square plastikard rods on top of them, all topped off with a length of 0.2mm wire across the top to represent the upper rollers and tops of the stools. 0.3mm is, I think, still a bit over scale (about 50% too thick) for the rods but ought to be close enough and still workable with a strong pair of specs.

If that doesn't work or I deem it to be too flimsy or not looking right , then I'll use the 0.2mm wire for the rods as well.

Well, that plan was a failure - the 0.3mm square plastikard is just too fragile to survive the ministrations of my ham-fisted mitts, combined with my aging mincies. It is also far too easy to melt right through it with the solvent  :(
If it can't even survive construction I have little faith that it will survive life on a working, luggable, layout either - so it's on to plan B, or maybe that should be plan D.

I guess that plan B was to try the plastikard rod but using superglue instead, another failure, and plan C was to try gluing 0.3mm wire on top of the plastikard stools but that wasn't too successful either. In both cases the superglue did try to melt the plastic a bit.

I have some 0.2mm copper wire which I reckon works out pretty close to a scale 1ľ", a little thicker after painting, which from memory is about right for prototype rodding.
The plan is to make a jig long enough for the length required for a run of the same number of rods, with rows of pins at each end around which I can stretch the required number of "rods" for that run. I'll then slip lengths of rail crosswise underneath the wires (think a guitar fretboard) so that I can solder the wires to the railhead. I'll probably need another jig, comprising pins at the same spacing, to act as a "comb" to ensure that the wire spacing is the same at the working point as it is at each end and, therefore, even throughout the run. Once each stool has been soldered to the wires I'll glue a short length of the 0.3mm wire across the top to represent the upper rollers.

When I have the entire run assembled I can (very carefully) remove it from the jig and transfer it to the layout, glueing each stool in place in turn.

I'll still be left with fiddly in-situ work to add the cranks, rods under the tracks and joins between the runs (where the number of rods changes) but I think it's got to be worth a try.


Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Newportnobby on March 15, 2019, 04:21:50 PM
Your devotion to the modelling art is worthy of an award. With my shaky hands and squinty eyes I'm not even going to attempt any point rodding :no: :no:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on March 15, 2019, 04:26:10 PM
Marvellous stuff!

I don't know if this will help:

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/6222-150319160945.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=74972)

Lakeside, October 2018.

If it's of no interest, please let me know and I'll delete the post so that I'm not cluttering up your fascinating thread with my holiday snaps.

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on March 15, 2019, 05:24:50 PM
Your devotion to the modelling art is worthy of an award. With my shaky hands and squinty eyes I'm not even going to attempt any point rodding :no: :no:

I have an ulterior motive - it puts off having to do the ballasting  :D

Besides, if I don't have a go before my hands get too shaky and my eyes worse than what they are now, I'll never do it.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on March 15, 2019, 05:27:17 PM
Marvellous stuff!

I don't know if this will help:
If it's of no interest, please let me know and I'll delete the post so that I'm not cluttering up your fascinating thread with my holiday snaps.

No, no, it's very useful thanks.

I presume that point is one of a crossover pair - since there's a rod going both ways from the crank.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on March 15, 2019, 06:02:22 PM
Marvellous stuff!

I don't know if this will help:
If it's of no interest, please let me know and I'll delete the post so that I'm not cluttering up your fascinating thread with my holiday snaps.

No, no, it's very useful thanks.

I presume that point is one of a crossover pair - since there's a rod going both ways from the crank.

Thank you very much.  Yes, the loco release crossover.  Worked by a ground frame released by the train staff as shown in another holiday snap (Mrs Train Waiting is very understanding):-

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/6222-150319175709.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=74981)

I'm really enjoying your thread; thank you.  I like the Coniston branch and the Furness generally.

All the best.

John
Title: Re: Coniston - my eyes hurt
Post by: chrism on March 29, 2019, 08:08:38 PM
Why do my eyes hurt, I hear you ask?

The answer is that Coniston now has point rodding, after a fashion - and after a long spell spent peering through two pairs of specs and a magnifying glass whilst juggling the soldering iron, solder, tweezers and a scalpel.

Here are a couple of pics of it as it stands, still with more to be done,  a) when some more materials arrive and b) once I've managed to uncross my poor mincies.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/7182-290319193202.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=75463)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/7182-290319193227.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=75464)

Plan D was the one that worked, 0.2mm wire soldered on top of lengths of rail, with a couple of changes from my original thoughts.

Firstly, rather than doing separate runs for each number of rods required and attempting to join them I stretched the right number of wires across my jig for the maximum number of rods required in a particular run and stopped fixing individual wires where they need to be tapped off for connecting to a point. Some of these can be seen hanging loose (for now) in the second pic - one in the background to connect to the adjacent point and two in the foreground which will connect to a point off to the left and to its facing point lock.

Secondly, I'm not bothering with gluing wires across the top to represent the upper rollers, the bulge of the solder will suffice.

I'll be the first to admit that it's not perfect but from a "normal" viewing distance I do think it looks pretty reasonable, certainly the best that I'm capable of doing at this stage of my learning. I particularly like the appearance of the thirteen rod run coming south from the signal box to the right in pic 1 and shown close up in pic 2), I've managed to get the wires close enough together that from a distance it does look like a prototypical row of closely spaced rods.
I'm sure it'll look better once I've tweaked the individual wires to get them straighter and more evenly spaced, then painted the rods with a rust wash and the stools with a dirty black - oh, and added the ballast underneath them.

The next stage is to add the cranks and rods to the points. I intend to make the cranks from slightly thicker wire, bent to a right angle, soldered to the ends of the "loose" rods then glued to pads glued to the baseboard. I'll make the cross-rods to the points from plastikard strip to avoid any risk of shorting between rails - once painted and partially buried in ballast they should look OK.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on March 29, 2019, 08:13:01 PM
looking like real track

really impressive sir. have you begun ballasting


theres a youtubeclip


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bj04VA4cOo8 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bj04VA4cOo8)


ballasting  everard junction - technique. i avoided all mechanisms in my point and worked round the outside , let
its settle. at no pint should   any glue or   ballast go near the   retention springs
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Newportnobby on March 29, 2019, 08:18:53 PM
Wot he said. Great work
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on March 30, 2019, 08:23:18 AM

Thanks, guys. I'm pleased with the way it's going.

have you begun ballasting

Not yet, I want to get the rodding finished first, plus I need to set the locations of all fixed structures (buildings, signals, etc.) beforehand so I can leave placeholders for them rather than get a load of stone thoroughly stuck down and have to go mining because I forgot something - well, I probably will forget something any way but I'd like to minimise it if I can.

theres a youtubeclip

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bj04VA4cOo8 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bj04VA4cOo8)

ballasting  everard junction - technique. i avoided all mechanisms in my point and worked round the outside , let
its settle. at no pint should   any glue or   ballast go near the   retention springs

Thanks, I'll have a look at that before I start. The points are indeed my main concern - particularly since Coniston is, or seems to be, mostly points. It was only a moderately sized branch terminus but they still put nineteen of the blighters in - twenty if you count the camping coach siding  hidden away around the bend at the northern end and twenty-one before they moved the coal yard from the northern end of the station to the back of the goods yard.

When I do start ballasting I'll kick off with the back siding in the goods yard. Firstly because it's a nice straight length with no points, secondly because if the first go isn't perfect it's the coal yard so it'll get liberally covered with coal dust and partially hidden by the coal staithes later. Then I'll work forwards so that, hopefully, I'll have got the hang of it by the time I get to the most visible areas.

Also, having seen what some of chaps are using down at the club, I'm not sure if the ballast I've got isn't a bit coarse. If it is, then having it right at the back will allow the perspective to conceal that somewhat.

"Dougal, this is fine ballast, that is far away."
"Oh right you are, Ted"
 :D

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on March 30, 2019, 02:59:02 PM
Superb period modelling and layout. Inspirational. Watch the clip on ballasting
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on March 31, 2019, 10:13:44 AM
Thanks, mate. Certainly will do before I start scattering stone.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 05, 2019, 07:24:46 PM
Well, that's torn it. I've finally run out of excuses so I've had to break out the bag of crushed stone.

All the point rodding is now complete - no pics as yet because I've painted it, dirty black for the stools and a rust wash for the rods, so it doesn't show up very much against the brown base coat I've put on the boards. Once I've got the hang of ballasting in the goods yard, I'll jump to a bit of track at the front which includes some rodding so I have a suitable contrast for photos..

I have to confess that when it came to the cranks I did manage the individual ones for a single rod leaving a run but chickened out when it came to an entire set (up to ten roads) turning 90 degrees and diving under tracks. I just couldn't get several cranks all looking the same and nicely in line. anyway, where those ten rods cross a track it's right in front of the loco shed and I know they were boarded over in the four foot so I've taken the liberty of assuming that they were also boarded over outside the rails too.

Since my last post I've determined the correct locations for, and sourced suitable (*) kits for, the main signals, ground signals, loading gauge, water crane and telegraph poles and glued small plastikard "pads" down where the items are to be located so that I can ballast up to those and save going mining to mount them later. I've also stuck down pads for where the buildings will go, for the same purpose, and raised the ground level in the goods yard to sleeper height because that's what it looks like in the photos.

(*) suitable means modifiable in several cases. The starter signals will be fine as is but the station entry and advanced starter signals need quite a few alterations - to start with the posts need to be a lot higher because they needed to be visible above a bridge, then the platform entry signals need to be all at the same height on a 3-doll bracket whilst the source model is a junction set all at different heights, etc., etc. Likewise, the Langley lattice footbridge is close but not quite right, especially the split flights of steps with half landings, but I should be able to sort that.

have you begun ballasting
theres a youtubeclip
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bj04VA4cOo8 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bj04VA4cOo8)
ballasting  everard junction - technique. i avoided all mechanisms in my point and worked round the outside , let
its settle. at no pint should   any glue or   ballast go near the   retention springs

Thanks for the link, a very instructive clip - especially around the point mechanism. I think that one was OO gauge so had more space between the sleepers for painting in neat PVA, but I think I'll give that a try on my points too. I'll use the spread stone, tidy and dribble dilute PVA method for the plain track though.

Having watched that vid, and a few others I've just done a test piece, a foot or so of track on a bit of wood, for practice. Hopefully it'll be ready enough by tomorrow evening for me tb be able to assess the results.

It was somewhat coincidental that the vid opened with the reason for doing that particular point, because I'd also had to replace a double radius point with a straight one because I didn't like the way the stock ran through my original choice.


Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 07, 2019, 03:34:40 PM
As promised, here's a pic of my rodding now I've progressed with the ballasting so the rods show up better;

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/7182-070419151648.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=75835)

This is the 13-rod run south from the signal box, with one rod having already come off for the point in the background and two coming off for the point to the left, one for the switch blades and one for the facing point lock. The cross-rods will eventually be buried a bit deeper so they just show the edges and don't look so much like what they are, strips of plastikard. That'll be done when I've done all the first attack of ballasting and return to tidy up where needed. I'll also do the final tweaking of the wires then to get them as close to parallel, straight and level as I can.

The big white blob in the background is the light reflecting off the plastikard pad that I've put down for the signal box base, with the boards covering the rods leading off to the right.

The ballasting is going pretty well. I've done about 90% of the visible part of layout and have had to stop because I've used up all my original pack and have to wait for the new stock to arrive. I haven't done any of the points between the switch blades yet, nor close to the tie rods, I'll do those when I'm having the general "tidy up" after all that I have done is fully set and I can see the bits that need touching up.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on April 07, 2019, 03:52:33 PM
The rodding looks absolutely fabulous!

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 07, 2019, 03:53:43 PM
thanks for sharing


loooks like a photo of real railway track and an exceptional view. chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 08, 2019, 06:43:58 AM
The rodding looks absolutely fabulous!
Best wishes.
John
[/quote[

thanks for sharing
loooks like a photo of real railway track and an exceptional view. chris

Thanks for your kind words of encouragement, guys.

I have to admit that I'm more than a little chuffed myself with the way it turned out. The hours spent peering through two pairs of specs and a magnifying glass paid off in the end.

However, before any one asks, no I am not intending to try adding the signal cables, pulleys, etc. nor the point rodding compensators - having done the rods and a few individual cranks I now definitely know my limitations.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Bealman on April 08, 2019, 06:57:49 AM
Awesome stuff! You're a braver man than me, that's for sure!  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 08, 2019, 07:25:00 AM
chris

again, beautiful layout. there was a link at L

https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=31722.0 (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=31722.0)

it just looks too fiddly and with health issues or in my case time and sausage fingers erm, but this is your interpretation. well done. chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 08, 2019, 08:03:06 AM
Awesome stuff! You're a braver man than me, that's for sure!  :thumbsup:

Or just madder  ;D
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 08, 2019, 08:14:45 AM

https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=31722.0 (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=31722.0)

it just looks too fiddly and with health issues or in my case time and sausage fingers erm, but this is your interpretation. well done. chris

Thanks, I saw that one amongst all the results for searches I did both on here and via Google, but decided that trying to assemble etched bits was definitely beyond my abilities, certainly at this stage of my 2mm modelling development - and moving rods in 2mm almost certainly beyond my abilities ever.

I also took the view that if seen from a "normal" viewing distance of a few feet, is anyone really going to notice (or quibble) if the stools aren't the correct shape? So I went for something that gives a close approximation to the right appearance, i.e. a row of closely spaced rods. Thinking about it, one could probably get a pretty close effect using appropriate width lengths of scored plastikard because the prototypical rods are only, from memory, about 1ľ" wide spaced less than about Ĺ" apart - and they'd be flat topped so a better representation of the inverted U-channel rods many railways used.

 
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 08, 2019, 10:43:29 AM
seeing the packs manufacturers make at shows this year and how fiddly they were made me think twice. a true inspiration to us all chris. and still reviewing your work - surely agree with yours and others comments. chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 09, 2019, 11:37:24 AM
Whilst waiting for the micro-quarry to deliver more stone so that I can finish the ballasting, I decided to rig up a lighting bar above the layout so that I can take better lit photos than I have up to now - also so that I can see what I'm doing at times.

These should give you a better impression of what Coniston will be like when I get it completed;

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/7182-090419112303.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=75963)


(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/7182-090419112336.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=75964)


(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/7182-090419112404.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=75965)


(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/7182-090419112437.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=75966)


(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/7182-090419112608.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=75967)


(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/7182-090419112635.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=75968)


(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/7182-090419112657.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=75969)


(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/7182-090419112728.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=75970)


(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/7182-090419112752.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=75971)

The backscene is neither properly fitted nor, even, remotely correct. It's just a tiled image that I downloaded, printed and taped together. It is, however, considerably better than the white card I have previously used. Ultimately I intend to take a photograph from the other side of the valley (I've already found the ideal location) and use that - with a bit of photoshopping to get rid of some houses that didn't exist in the late 1930s and some more recent alterations that have been made to one that did.

I'm pleased to see that the point rodding shows up pretty well even in the shots showing the entire layout.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: port perran on April 09, 2019, 11:42:16 AM
Starting to look very good indeed.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 09, 2019, 11:44:15 AM
looking good so far. a superb layout, patience and hard work will  be worth it and the fruits of labour for a beautiful layout !!!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: joe cassidy on April 09, 2019, 11:45:33 AM
Those are great photos.

I love the curved platforms.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Newportnobby on April 09, 2019, 12:37:19 PM
Very nice indeed,
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on April 09, 2019, 12:48:41 PM
This layout just keeps on getting better!

Thank you for these excellent photographs.

I agree with Joe regarding the curved platforms.  Your photographs clearly show the tight curve through the excursion platform.  I understand that this caused occasional difficulties for the Big Coniston.  Hopefully, all will be well on your smaller one.

I think a Union Mills 'Cauliflower' 0-6-0 would be just the thing on Coniston.  I know that they are particularly associated with the CK&PR, but they are, to me, redolent of steam in Lakeland.

Thanks again and best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 09, 2019, 05:16:08 PM
Thanks, everyone, for your kind words. I'm certainly happy with the way it's going.

I love the curved platforms.

Have to admit that I didn't at first - couldn't work out the best way to cut them accurately.
Then I had the brainstormwave of only making the edges and infilling them. So that's what I did, I cut strips of plywood only 5 or 6mm wide, glued one end down at the distance I wanted from the outer rail, then worked my way along bending them around as I went, measuring at each point and glueing, then on to the next, etc., etc. Finally I had both faces in place and could just fill in between.
I don't think I'd have managed as neat curves otherwise.

I agree with Joe regarding the curved platforms.  Your photographs clearly show the tight curve through the excursion platform.  I understand that this caused occasional difficulties for the Big Coniston.  Hopefully, all will be well on your smaller one.

The books I have describe the excursion platform as "unpopular with the operators" but not whether or not it did cause serious problems. It was probably noisy due to wheel squeal, possibly further exacerbated by the inclusion of a check rail around the tightest parts - which I haven't yet decided whether or not to include.

The only "issue" in the model is that the platform has to be quite well spaced away from the track but that isn't a big issue since the excessive gap will be hidden by any stock in or passing the platform.

It hasn't caused any running problems with any of my stock - but it's nowhere near as tight as the curves at each end of my model and the only problem those have given me is that the north end curve, being the tightest, invariably causes my old Peco Jubilee to uncouple from my new Farish Stanier coaches - not that I would be sending either around that end in normal operation since that's only supposed to go the the copper/slate wharf for the mines and a siding for the camping coaches.

I think a Union Mills 'Cauliflower' 0-6-0 would be just the thing on Coniston.  I know that they are particularly associated with the CK&PR, but they are, to me, redolent of steam in Lakeland.

Hmm, sounds local enough to be tempting  :)
After all I am running a Fowler 4F with no knowledge of whether any did go to Coniston and a Fairburn Tank which wasn't introduced until after WWII, even though my loco shed will be in its pre-war form with the nice pitched roof - instead of the horrible-looking flat one that was put on following a fire during the war.

At least I don't have to worry about considering any diseasels. AFAIK the only ones that ever went there were some AEC railcars that were tried but couldn't cope with the gradients and some Metrovic Co-Bos - which ran the demolition trains, and I have no intention of modelling it being demolished  :no:

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 09, 2019, 05:37:49 PM
chris

think rule 1 may have to be put in place. as far as i can see re the 4F....https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coniston_Railway


The line was closed for passenger trains on 6 October 1958. On 27 August 1961 an enthusiast's train ran on the line pulled by Fowler 4F 44347. Freight services ended on 30 April 1962 the link gives some cluesastolocos you may find on the line. hope this may provide a clue  otherwise research may   be   needed.chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 09, 2019, 05:45:02 PM
think rule 1 may have to be put in place. as far as i can see re the 4F....https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coniston_Railway

Cheers mate. I had seen that wiki page before but missed the bit about the 4F pulling the enthusiasts' special.

Would I be correct in thinking that rule 1 is "run what you like"?  :laugh3:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 09, 2019, 06:06:07 PM
yes, rule  1  is run what you wish, its your layout.i have not found MUCH photographic evidence of the tour, stock, details susoect mk1s, ex  lms stock.

i did however see :

https://www.sixbellsjunction.co.uk/60s/ht1961.html (https://www.sixbellsjunction.co.uk/60s/ht1961.html)


27/08/61    SLS/MLS    1Z44    Furness Rail Tour    43282, 44347 & 46152


can you make head tail of :


https://www.sixbellsjunction.co.uk/60s/610827sl.html (https://www.sixbellsjunction.co.uk/60s/610827sl.html)

may give clues



Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 10, 2019, 06:21:41 AM
can you make head tail of :
https://www.sixbellsjunction.co.uk/60s/610827sl.html (https://www.sixbellsjunction.co.uk/60s/610827sl.html)

Looks like it was detached from a Manchester-Morecambe excursion at Lancaster. From there, it went direct from Lancaster to Dalton-in-Furness behind a Johnson 3F, joined by the 4F at Plumpton Junction.

The 3F was dropped at Dalton and the 4F took it over all remaining lines on the Furness Peninsular, including right down into Barrow docks. Then it went around the Duddon Estuary to Millom and down past Millom Ironworks to the Hodbarrow heamatite mines - the latter being the reason that Millom exists at all,

It then returned to Millom and back round the estuary to Foxfield before going up the Coniston Branch to Coniston. It then returned to the main line at Foxfield and took the Dalton to Ulverston line again before heading off to Morecambe from where the Scot took it back to Manchester.

It should have rejoined the original excursion for the return to Manchester but was running late so the two halves returned independently.

Must have been quite a day TBH.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 10, 2019, 06:45:20 AM
Morning. At least there is some evidence of the stock used and yes operational / crewing the train must have been a challenge. Chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 10, 2019, 12:02:29 PM
I think a Union Mills 'Cauliflower' 0-6-0 would be just the thing on Coniston.  I know that they are particularly associated with the CK&PR, but they are, to me, redolent of steam in Lakeland.

Cauliflower now ordered  :)

If I like it, I may consider following it with their Johnson 3F as well, but I think the 2P or Prince of Wales would be a bit OTT for Coniston.

 
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 10, 2019, 12:25:01 PM
Thanks been busy. The cauliflower and the 3f will suit your layout
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on April 10, 2019, 02:37:10 PM
I think a Union Mills 'Cauliflower' 0-6-0 would be just the thing on Coniston.  I know that they are particularly associated with the CK&PR, but they are, to me, redolent of steam in Lakeland.

Cauliflower now ordered  :)

If I like it, I may consider following it with their Johnson 3F as well, but I think the 2P or Prince of Wales would be a bit OTT for Coniston.

Splendid news!

These little 0-6-0s from Union Mills are excellent runners.  I hope you like it.  Union Mills locomotives are a bit different from Graham Farish and Dapol but I think they are the bee's knees!

There is also a '2F', not in the current list, which is a lovely little thing.

I have a photograph of '2F' No. 58309 at Haverthwaite in 1954 on the goods to Ulverstone and Barrow.  So the class was in your general area.  The same book has a nice photograph of ex-L&Y 2-4-2T No. 10644 at Coniston.  It's August, 1950 but still the LMS number.

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 10, 2019, 03:51:01 PM
Splendid news!
These little 0-6-0s from Union Mills are excellent runners. 

So I've heard - possibly less detailed than other manufacturers but excellent runners.
TBH, IMO in 2mm scale at a "normal" viewing distance the level of detail required is not really as great as some rivet-counters expect - nice to have but not essential.

It does help if models are approximately right though, unlike the Farish J94 where the rear cab windows aren't even a vague approximation of correct  :no:

Quote
The same book has a nice photograph of ex-L&Y 2-4-2T No. 10644 at Coniston.  It's August, 1950 but still the LMS number.

That loco hung around in the area for quite a time then, one of the books I have about the Coniston Railway has a pic of it approaching Coniston in June 1935.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 11, 2019, 02:50:41 PM
These little 0-6-0s from Union Mills are excellent runners.  I hope you like it.  Union Mills locomotives are a bit different from Graham Farish and Dapol but I think they are the bee's knees!

The Cauliflower arrived today - less than 24 hours after I ordered it, that's what I call great service. Mind you, with a decent catapult Colin could have saved the postage and delivered direct, since I'm only just across the Irish sea from the Isle of Man  :D

First impressions - it's a lovely little model and feels very substantial. It's only had a brief run up and down a couple of feet of track so far because I'm still ballasting and that's the only bit that I know is clean and free of loose chippings. However, it ran very smoothly and quietly. When I've got the ballasting finished and everything properly cleaned I'll put it to the test and hook up every bit of stock I have to see how it copes  :D
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 11, 2019, 03:00:36 PM
now for the 4F


look forward to photos chris. you pleased with your new acquisition ?
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 11, 2019, 03:24:27 PM
now for the 4F

3F - I've already got the Farish 4F.

Quote
look forward to photos chris. you pleased with your new acquisition ?

I am so far - I'll know better when I get the chance to give it a good run, but the early impressions tend towards well pleased  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on April 11, 2019, 03:26:30 PM
The backscene is neither properly fitted nor, even, remotely correct. It's just a tiled image that I downloaded, printed and taped together. It is, however, considerably better than the white card I have previously used. Ultimately I intend to take a photograph from the other side of the valley (I've already found the ideal location) and use that - with a bit of photoshopping to get rid of some houses that didn't exist in the late 1930s and some more recent alterations that have been made to one that did.

I'm pleased to see that the point rodding shows up pretty well even in the shots showing the entire layout.

If you need any help with the backscene give me a shout, I'm a graphic designer with photo editing software available and happy to help out if needed  :beers:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 11, 2019, 03:26:48 PM
thats what i meant chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 11, 2019, 03:50:49 PM
If you need any help with the backscene give me a shout, I'm a graphic designer with photo editing software available and happy to help out if needed  :beers:

Thanks mate, but I should be OK. I'm pretty competent with using Photoshop for my photo editing, including resizing images by rather large amounts.
The only thing I don't know yet is if I can find a printer to print it out as a single length to avoid joins and, hopefully, on canvas rather than paper/card so it can be rolled up for transportation with less tendency to try and retain the rolled shape.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on April 11, 2019, 08:08:07 PM

The Cauliflower arrived today - less than 24 hours after I ordered it, that's what I call great service. Mind you, with a decent catapult Colin could have saved the postage and delivered direct, since I'm only just across the Irish sea from the Isle of Man  :D

First impressions - it's a lovely little model and feels very substantial. It's only had a brief run up and down a couple of feet of track so far because I'm still ballasting and that's the only bit that I know is clean and free of loose chippings. However, it ran very smoothly and quietly. When I've got the ballasting finished and everything properly cleaned I'll put it to the test and hook up every bit of stock I have to see how it copes  :D

I'm really glad that you are happy with the Cauliflower.  I'm guessing it's your first Union Mills locomotive.  It'll likely pull all your rolling stock.  In my experience, couplings along the train part before a UM locomotive stalls.

The UM service is as good as it gets.  By coincidence, the catapult was aimed in the direction of Midlothian today as well!

With best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 11, 2019, 08:45:13 PM
I'm really glad that you are happy with the Cauliflower.  I'm guessing it's your first Union Mills locomotive.  It'll likely pull all your rolling stock.  In my experience, couplings along the train part before a UM locomotive stalls.

It is indeed my first - I hadn't even heard f them until recently.
I wouldn't be surprised oif it can pull all my stock - My Farish Jinty (the new one, not the GP Tank that vaguely resembles one) can pull all my freight stock and that hasn't got so much weight over the wheels, has larger driven wheels and no traction tyres.

Quote
The UM service is as good as it gets.  By coincidence, the catapult was aimed in the direction of Midlothian today as well!

Aha, on what have you been splashing out?

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on April 12, 2019, 09:09:41 AM

Quote
The UM service is as good as it gets.  By coincidence, the catapult was aimed in the direction of Midlothian today as well!

Aha, on what have you been splashing out?

To be revealed over the next day or two in the Poppingham thread...

Thank you.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 12, 2019, 09:50:48 AM

Quote
The UM service is as good as it gets.  By coincidence, the catapult was aimed in the direction of Midlothian today as well!

Aha, on what have you been splashing out?

To be revealed over the next day or two in the Poppingham thread...


You tease  ;D
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 12, 2019, 01:08:24 PM
It'll likely pull all your rolling stock.  In my experience, couplings along the train part before a UM locomotive stalls.

Impressed is definitely an understatement.

I've just had the Cauliflower pulling absolutely all my stock - 34 assorted vintage Peco, Farish, Minitrix and Lima 4-wheel wagons, 6 modern Farish Stanier coaches and 3 old Farish suburban type coaches. That "little" lot is the full length of the scenic side of Coniston taking the longest route through.

I set it for the most convoluted route I can, over all the crossovers to and through the passing loop outside the excursion platform on the scenic side and through the most offset, shortest fiddle yard loop - and the little Cauliflower didn't bat an eyelid  :thumbsup:

Nothing else I have got anywhere close. The Fairburn and 4F just slipped but couldn't pull away, The Black 5 pulled away but slipped to a standstill partway round the tight bend at the northern end of the layout, and both the modern Farish Jinty and the old farish GP tank got partway through the fiddle yard before slipping to a standstill. I didn't bother trying the old Peco Jubilee because I know it'll uncouple on the tightest curve, it always does even with only three or four coaches.

Thanks for the recommendation, John.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: paulprice on April 12, 2019, 01:23:33 PM
I have a G2 and 3F I cant wait to run them on my layout if I ever get it released from train prison.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 12, 2019, 01:49:20 PM
I have a G2 and 3F I cant wait to run them on my layout if I ever get it released from train prison.

Having seen and run the Cauliflower I have a feeling that the 3F will be on my shopping list.

The G2, fine looking beast that it is, is really way too OTT for Coniston. Such a loco really needs a long layout to show off its freight hauling capabilities to their best.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 12, 2019, 02:01:25 PM
im pleased the cauliflower passed the test, the locomotive,i meant - what hauling capability !!!!

now to the 3F to join the Coniston shed / family
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on April 12, 2019, 04:26:08 PM
I'm glad and relieved that you like the 'Cauliflower'.  Recommending something can be a worrying thing to do.  The combination of a good product, fair price and wonderful service makes Union Mills one of the easier recommendations to make.

With regard to matters '3F', Motive Power Officers from the Furness Section are cordially invited to visit* the Poppingham - a Table-Top Railway thread, where, amongst a very great deal of silliness they might see something of interest.

* Refreshments will be served.

All good wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 12, 2019, 05:09:57 PM
Im pleased union mills delivered the goods successfully. Look forward to photos and glad customer service and mechanical reliability were good
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 12, 2019, 05:52:41 PM
* Refreshments will be served.

Couldn't find the buffet, but I did find the 3F - I think might well be on the phone to across the water on Monday  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 14, 2019, 09:37:47 AM
A quick piccie of the Cauliflower entering Coniston through the new under construction overbridge;

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-140419091829.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76203)

The previous, white plastic, bridge was only a temporary affair and was always intended to be replaced. I had considered simply covering it with scenic paper (either my own or commercially available) but then I thought, "Well the original is still in place."

So I was off up to big Coniston yesterday with the camera, photographing details of everything that still remains, then sat down with Photoshop resizing the images to 2mm scale, albeit making the bridge a tad wider than scale to accommodate the overhangs of the stock on a very unprototypical curve.

Therefore, if the bridge and walls look something  like a photograph, there's a very good reason for it - they are  :D

The top of the lefthand retaining wall has the road coming down from the bridge behind it so I've also photographed that side of the wall and will make the whole shebang by gluing the resized photos to thick card. Initially I'll make the top surface by copying the upper stones and "stretching" them.

I'll be doing all the other walls in a similar fashion. I'm not sure how, or if, I can make the real wall tops of vertical slate slabs stuck on top every 8" or so - presumably to stop people sitting on them.

In the meantime, I have a lot of reworking to do on the scenery at that end of the layout. Now I have photos of the real thing I can adjust the gradient of the road to be correct instead of my previous, as is now apparent, not very good guesstimate.



 
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 14, 2019, 09:51:26 AM
Thanks for that. Did your new pride and joy run well and exceed expectations? Chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 14, 2019, 10:09:48 AM
Thanks for that. Did your new pride and joy run well and exceed expectations? Chris

Oh definitely - 3F to order now  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 14, 2019, 10:41:39 AM
chris


takeit you saw this link to help you make your mind  up:


https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=980.0 (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=980.0)


thanks for the photo. that will have mick newport nobby rather pleased
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 14, 2019, 11:00:47 AM
takeit you saw this link to help you make your mind  up:

https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=980.0 (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=980.0)

Actually, no. I've never seen that thread before  :-[

It was solely the recommendations on this thread followed by a couple of googles to confirm that it's not the white-headed variety of the brassica family which I have, to date, had little success growing  :o

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on April 14, 2019, 02:03:59 PM
A quick piccie of the Cauliflower entering Coniston through the new under construction overbridge...

The photograph caught my attention and I was wondering how you had made such a stunning model.  Then I read the text and found out.  Very clever; very clever indeed.

It's a great photograph; the 'Cauliflower' certainly looks the part in the scene.

Thanks for that. Did your new pride and joy run well and exceed expectations? Chris

Oh definitely - 3F to order now  :thumbsup:

Excellent!  I rather think that you'll be pleased with it.  Two little, black, LMS locomotives... but they look very different.

Thank you very much for the photograph and informative post.

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 14, 2019, 03:24:32 PM
A quick piccie of the Cauliflower entering Coniston through the new under construction overbridge...

The photograph caught my attention and I was wondering how you had made such a stunning model.  Then I read the text and found out.  Very clever; very clever indeed.

Cheers, mate.

My original thought was to simply photograph as large a slate wall as I could find and turn that into a scenic paper to use for everything. The largest wall I know is at Honister slate mine but, of course, that is Honister Slate which is subtly different from Coniston slate. Having seen so much of the basic structures still at Coniston I decided to try and use something from there instead - then realised that I might as well use photos of the actual originals where possible.

Of course, I'll have to use a selection of walls from what's still there for the buildings which are not - although I hope to use the same trick for the slate office which still stands and which I photographed (with a known size object in the frame to aid the scaling) yesterday.

Quote

Oh definitely - 3F to order now  :thumbsup:

Excellent!  I rather think that you'll be pleased with it.  Two little, black, LMS locomotives... but they look very different.


Indeed they do - I googled them to see if there is sufficient difference to justify getting them both, and decided that there is  :thumbsup:

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 15, 2019, 03:56:04 PM
Ordered the UM 3F this morning so, hopefully, by this time tomorrow the Cauliflower won't be feeling quite so put out at being the only geriatric loco at Coniston.

On the scenery front, I've made up some more scenic papers for the site retaining wall, etc. and done most of the landscape remodelling for the road leading down from the overbridge. Whilst waiting for the last application of filler to set enough to sand I gave the cliff face behind the coal siding a going over. I've dry brushed (or tried to) over some patches with a lighter grey and two shades orange to simulate iron traces in the rock. I then dry brushed a bit more of the dark grey over some of those to blend them in a bit. Hopefully it'll look OK once I've dotted various bits of foliage around - especially at the baseboard join.

Then I moved to the other end of the layout and had a go at applying flock to one area - yet another "first,  never done it before" for me.  Surprisingly I don't appear to have made too much of a mess. The truth will tell when the glue's dried and I hoover up the surplus.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 15, 2019, 04:07:15 PM
Im glad your cauliflower will have a shed mate in the 3f. Look forward to photos and the appropropriate coaches and wagons. The retaining wall looks stunning and realistic. Chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 15, 2019, 04:18:58 PM
The retaining wall looks stunning and realistic.

It should do, seeing as it's made from a photo of the original suitably photoshopped to get it the right scale height and tiled to give the required length. It beats paying for commercial scenic paper that will never be quite correct  :D
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on April 15, 2019, 04:35:59 PM
Then I moved to the other end of the layout and had a go at applying flock to one area - yet another "first,  never done it before" for me.  Surprisingly I don't appear to have made too much of a mess. The truth will tell when the glue's dried and I hoover up the surplus.

I'm a novice at flocking as well.  I find it takes three coats (maybe four) to get the effect I'm looking for.  I brush off and save what surplus flock I can, before giving the flocked area a thorough going-over with the Dyson.

Great news about the '3F'!

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 15, 2019, 04:55:39 PM
Then I moved to the other end of the layout and had a go at applying flock to one area - yet another "first,  never done it before" for me.  Surprisingly I don't appear to have made too much of a mess. The truth will tell when the glue's dried and I hoover up the surplus.

I'm a novice at flocking as well.  I find it takes three coats (maybe four) to get the effect I'm looking for.  I brush off and save what surplus flock I can, before giving the flocked area a thorough going-over with the Dyson.

Yes, I reckon I'll need several coats too - having seen the results after waving my handheld vacuum over it. Still looks better than my emulsioned surface though.

Do you use neat PVA or diluted? For this first try I used the same as I did for the ballasting, 50:50 PVA and water with a drop of washing up liquid.

Quote
Great news about the '3F'!

The Cauliflower seemed pleased when I told it that there was another 0-6-0 winging its way over the sea to keep it company.

.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 15, 2019, 05:09:29 PM
Practice makes perfect. I would aim 50.50, but go with what you feel comfortable with working in small sections at a time and stopping to see how it looks, blending shades, dealing with glue etc. Nothing worse than henry sucking vacuuming up the fruits of labour
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on April 15, 2019, 06:33:13 PM
Do you use neat PVA or diluted? For this first try I used the same as I did for the ballasting, 50:50 PVA and water with a drop of washing up liquid.

I think it's a matter of trial and error.  As Martin @port perran (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=230) helpfully pointed out recently, not all PVAs are the same.  I was very happy with 'Diall Decorator's PVA' from B&Q, as it didn't need to be diluted.  When my bottle ran out, I found that they had discontinued it.  The nearest product they had in stock was 'Diall Adhesive, Sealer, Primer'.  It is thicker.  It is a 'water based PVA emulsion' and it's British-made.  Good!  After experimenting, I now I dilute it about 2/3 PVA to 1/3 water using warm-ish water from the kettle a while after having made tea.

For flocking, I brush the dilute PVA on.  I once tried adding a drop of washing-up liquid, as for ballasting, and got bubbles!  The brushing action appears enough to break the surface tension, so I don't use detergent now.  The 'eye-dropper' action with ballasting benefits greatly from detergent, in my experience.  But the loose ballast is in place, whereas I brush on the PVA and then sprinkle the flock over it, so different techniques.

And, another hint I picked up from Martin; gently press the flock down into the PVA.

Lots of thanks to Martin.

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 15, 2019, 07:34:22 PM

And, another hint I picked up from Martin; gently press the flock down into the PVA.


Cheers, mate. I had wondered whether or not to do that.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 15, 2019, 08:08:23 PM
would agree with the above techniques and gently work a bit at a time with thumbs and small areas work in scrape odd bits away from tracks but i use coffee stirrers from costa just as a marker before any delicate work and have old newspapers ready if i drop any easier to recover and re use, saves wastage
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: cudders on April 15, 2019, 09:18:31 PM
What a great layout.

Looking very nice pal.

Stayed in Coniston many times and wandered along the old path of the line as much as possible.

Keep up the updates  :thumbsup:

Cudders
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on April 15, 2019, 09:36:23 PM
I've usually mixed a bit of poster paint (British Leyland brown usually) in with the PVA so that any bubbles or bare patches don't show white but simply show 'mud'

Looking forward to more pictures as progress advances, I keep checking my bank balance in hope that I have enough for a loco but I know I must keep what I have for electronics to get things running - that and I can't decide between a Prince of Wales or a Cauliflower.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 16, 2019, 06:14:29 AM
Thanks guys.

Hopefully the next photos will show the southern end of the layout largely complete. I slapped my usual coat of emulsion on the revised landscape last night and it doesn't look like it needs more filler so I can get on with the proper bridge, walls, road and  fields - hopefully  ;)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 16, 2019, 06:29:31 AM
Hopefully your loco should be delivered from the works and the best stock in the carriage shed and wagon works awaits. Glad the painting went well
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 16, 2019, 06:18:31 PM
Hopefully your loco should be delivered from the works and the best stock in the carriage shed and wagon works awaits.

Yep, the 3F arrived and the Cauliflower has been teaching it the road.

I hadn't realised quite how different the two were - I never managed to find a pic of both the real ones in the same place at the same time. It was rather interesting to line them up with my other 0-6-0 tender loco, the Farish 4F, in particular seeing how the boiler diameter grew to give the higher power rating.

Mostly today, however, I've been on civil engineering. The proper bridge and retaining walls are now in place, along with sufficient scenic bits behind the bridge (and backscene) so that one cannot see any bare boards, etc when looking through the bridge.
I've still got half of the roadside walls, the retaining wall between the station site and the fields below and the wall separating the footpath below the retaining wall from the fields to do, oh and some foliage, before I'm ready to take the next photos.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 16, 2019, 06:54:48 PM
chris

hi i found a few photos albeit at keswick and other places ....

just in case your interested


https://www.national-preservation.com/threads/webb-lnwr-0-6-0-cauliflower.1001156/ (https://www.national-preservation.com/threads/webb-lnwr-0-6-0-cauliflower.1001156/)

http://www.railuk.info/history/gethistory.php?id=351 (http://www.railuk.info/history/gethistory.php?id=351)

one may have to look at cam camwell collection :

https://www.wolvertonrail.com/acatalog/Kingfisher-Cam-Camwell-Collection.html (https://www.wolvertonrail.com/acatalog/Kingfisher-Cam-Camwell-Collection.html)

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on April 16, 2019, 09:28:02 PM
Glad the '3F' has arrived.  Isn't Union Mills' service is excellent++. 

I look forward to more photographs in due course...

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 16, 2019, 10:01:20 PM
Glad the '3F' has arrived.  Isn't Union Mills' service is excellent++. 

Indeed - mind you the Irish sea Catapult helps, I'v had equally speedy deliveries from Trackshack too.

Quote
I look forward to more photographs in due course...

Another day or two I reckon - I'd like to get the southern end at least 90% finished now I'm on a roll with it.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 16, 2019, 10:12:49 PM
thank you

certainly looking good so far the scenic side of the line

its an interisting, historical project. from  one chris to another
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Innovationgame on April 17, 2019, 06:28:27 AM
chris

hi i found a few photos albeit at keswick and other places ....

just in case your interested


[url]https://www.national-preservation.com/threads/webb-lnwr-0-6-0-cauliflower.1001156/[/url] ([url]https://www.national-preservation.com/threads/webb-lnwr-0-6-0-cauliflower.1001156/[/url])

[url]http://www.railuk.info/history/gethistory.php?id=351[/url] ([url]http://www.railuk.info/history/gethistory.php?id=351[/url])

one may have to look at cam camwell collection :

[url]https://www.wolvertonrail.com/acatalog/Kingfisher-Cam-Camwell-Collection.html[/url] ([url]https://www.wolvertonrail.com/acatalog/Kingfisher-Cam-Camwell-Collection.html[/url])
Excellent links! Thanks :beers:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 17, 2019, 06:49:05 AM
Thought you may like some history. Those were the days
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 19, 2019, 04:20:59 PM
Here are some pics of both the 3F and the Cauliflower, as well as the latest state of progress on Coniston;


Johnson/Deeley 3F 3777 is arriving with the latest delivery of coal from Trumpton Colliery whilst Webb 18" Goods "Cauliflower" 8589 is in the loco headshunt awaiting its turn over the ashpit which is currently occupied by Fowler 3F "Jinty" 7309. When it's finished on the ashpit, the Jinty will leave the loco yard via the turntable because the headshunt, unlike that on the original Coniston, won't accommodate both locos.

The eagle-eyed may observe that I've been rather busy on civil engineering of late - bridge bulding, road laying and wall building. I've also been doing a bit of flocking (ooer missus) and foliage planting.

This is a view of the entrance to Coniston station site at the southern end. Level with the 3F is where the retaining wall above the track level ends and the one below starts. Here is where I've adopted modeller's license since the field of sheep and horses "should" be the first of a row of houses but I've decided not to bother with non-railway buildings (at least to start with) so all those below the station site are being replaced with fields. Similarly, the footpath between the retaining wall and an outer wall isn't really so enclosed until further along but I needed something to prevent Mr Satterthwaite's sheep from wandering.
They aren't native sheep so don't know where they can and can't go - although when I've applied some grey and chestnut brown to their bodies they will become Herdwicks, grey being the older ones and brown the yearlings.

Where the step between the two walls is will be the start of a fence running the full length of the site along the top of the retaining wall, I've put the step in at the join of the two retaining walls to give a convenient anchoring point for the end of the fence.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-190419150904.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76348)


Next we have a closer look at the overbridge and retaining walls for the southern end cutting. For the bridge and all the walls I've photographed the actual things and edited the images to give me correctly scaled scenic paper. This I've stuck to card to give the thickness and topped the walls with a thin strip of stones which I found most appropriate from the various photos I took. I may revisit them to apply the typical Lakeland wall tops - namely pieces of slate fixed vertically crosswise on top - when I've worked out the best (and simplest, coz there'll be a lot of them) way of doing it.

The "tarmac" on the road and also the footpath is 800 grit wet and dry abrasive paper which seems to do the job quite well.

I couldn't be bothered trying to photoshop out all the foliage growing on the real bridge, so I've added flock over the larger bits to give it depth.

The white square behind the red "Pugh" wagon is where the inner home signals will be located - on that square will be a very tall 3-doll home, indicating arrival to platform 1, 2 or 3. On the other side of the running line, just behind the Cauliflower and the buffers, will be another tall post carrying a home signal facing south indicating entry to the goods yard and another facing north indicating that it is clear for a train to enter the single line section to Torver and beyond. Both signal posts were tall so that the signals could be seen from the other side of the bridge. The Langley lower quadrant kits give me the basics but need to be modified with lengths of brass rod to give the added height and also turn their triple junction signal into the 3-doll one with all the arms at the same level that I need. I may even try to get the things working, hopefully.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-190419151044.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76351)


Finally, here is a general view of this end of the layout, showing the changes to the cliff face above the goods yard, which is no longer a uniform grey and now has the wall and some foliage planted on top.
To the left, the turntable is no longer white - at last. I lined the pit with a length of the same scenic paper I made to do the various walls but was a bit unsure as to how best to do the coping stones around the perimiter. Then I realised how generous the Furness Railway were to use a round arch for the overbridge, so I mirrored the bridge image and carefully resized it so that my turntable surround is actually the arch course of stones from the bridge - cheating, I know, but it serves the purpose.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-190419151003.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76350)


All in all, I'm pretty pleased with the progress I've managed recently - just got about three times more of it to do to bring the rest of the layout up to the same state.

The only disappointment is the brown "stuff" to the left of the tracks. Natural Scenics describe it as "Slate Grey Scatter - Fine", but I've never seen any slate that colour. I'll either cover it with something more the
right colour or give it a wash or two of very weak blue and grey watercolour to get it closer to what it should be.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Portpatrick on April 19, 2019, 06:05:53 PM
You are certainly catching the feel of the place.  The issue of breed of sheep is interesting.  When I was building Portpatrick Town (now dismantled) , in its early stages c 2003, our holiday conveniently took in that corner of Scotland.  My wife observed that the cows were not all black and white Friesians.  Some were brown and white , so a plain buff colour.   I confirmed this by studying some DVDs which incorporated the routes to Stranraer.  So I repainted many of those I had bought to reflect this.  One of those small details it is worth getting right.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: dannyboy on April 19, 2019, 06:17:13 PM
Looking very good @chrism (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=7182)   :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on April 19, 2019, 06:31:57 PM
Absolutely excellent!

And Poppingham's Flossie and Herdy are looking forward to seeing lots of their relations on Coniston in due course.

Thank you for a very interesting post.

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: port perran on April 19, 2019, 06:40:07 PM
Great stuff.
This is developing very nicely indeed, thanks for keeping us up to date.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 19, 2019, 06:48:31 PM
thank you for a superb series of photos and commentary. gives us all a glimpse of life in cumbria. the locos look beautiful, scenery and the local stonework, the capturing of the tunnel, retaining walls, bends in the track. am i living in the local area ? not in reality but captures my imagination

superb rendetion of the farm lands and local walls, just feeling like a local

chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Newportnobby on April 19, 2019, 08:43:33 PM
 :greatwork:

Looking excellent
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Bealman on April 19, 2019, 10:16:19 PM
I agree totally with all the above comments. This is lovely work, which, for someone who lives so far away, evokes pleasant memories of his favourite part of England.

Please don't take this as criticism - it's not - and it's not your fault anyway, but it's a shame Peco don't use rail instead of plastic for the guard rails on their points. Always been a letdown, I feel.

I think your protypically light coloured ballast may be just highlighting them in the photos. Nothing to lose sleep over.

Brilliant work.  :beers:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 20, 2019, 06:40:41 AM
Thanks very much, all. I'm enjoying building this layout and your kind comments and encouragement add to to that enjoyment,

The issue of breed of sheep is interesting.  When I was building Portpatrick Town (now dismantled) , in its early stages c 2003, our holiday conveniently took in that corner of Scotland.  My wife observed that the cows were not all black and white Friesians.  Some were brown and white , so a plain buff colour.   I confirmed this by studying some DVDs which incorporated the routes to Stranraer.  So I repainted many of those I had bought to reflect this.  One of those small details it is worth getting right.

Oh definitely - up here they've simply got to be Herdwicks  :thumbsup:
Besides, with the two colourings of the older and younger sheep they stand out as not being "just" sheep.

Please don't take this as criticism - it's not - and it's not your fault anyway, but it's a shame Peco don't use rail instead of plastic for the guard rails on their points. Always been a letdown, I feel.
I think your protypically light coloured ballast may be just highlighting them in the photos. Nothing to lose sleep over.

It's coincidental that you say this - when editing the last photo for this update it was the first time I'd really noticed it myself. They do rather stand out, don't they?

I suspect the slightly harsh white overhead lighting may also be exacerbating the effect too. When I've got further along I'll have a play with lighting (and better photography) and see what that does.
It may also be more apparent on my layout than on others because of the number of points in Coniston, particularly the number closely grouped at the southern end of the station.

I guess that they don't use rail because that would undoubtedly bump up the cost - which with 19 of the things in Coniston would certainly have hurt my pocket.

I'll press on and if I feel that it does detract from the overall effect then I'll dig out the silver paint.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Bealman on April 20, 2019, 06:50:25 AM
I painted them rust-coloured on my layout, but I've never really been happy with them.

One must remember that the first Peco N gauge points appeared in the mid sixties, and apart from Electrofrog and the new Unipoint or whatever they're called, have remained much the same ever since!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 20, 2019, 06:57:02 AM
Thank you for superb photos and commentary. Hope your new acquisitions and locos meet expectations and run well. The scenic modelling is inspiring
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 20, 2019, 07:10:18 AM
How did you manage modelling the southern end of the station? With a closely grouped complex set of points must have been an interesting challenge for the real railway pway let alone you
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 20, 2019, 07:43:28 AM
How did you manage modelling the southern end of the station? With a closely grouped complex set of points must have been an interesting challenge for the real railway pway let alone you

It wasn't too bad actually - although it would have been easier if the Furness Railway (or the LMS during any rebuilding) had used Peco points instead of bespoke ones  :laugh3:

I scanned the layout plan from a book about the Coniston Railway and blew it up so that I could print it out full size at 2mm/ft scale - conveniently, the author had included a scale on the plan. That confirmed the baseboard size into which I could fit it so I then downloaded, printed and cut out all the Peco points plans and laid them over the plan to determine which would give the best fit and fiddled with them to get a decent alignment - and avoiding having points over baseboard joins or any tiebars over sub-base support beams. I also had to ensure that the baseboards would fit in the car so the length of each was restricted by that.

In general it all fitted very close to the plan, which did surprise me to be honest. IIRC the only real compromise that I had to make in the pointwork was shifting the point adjacent to the loco shed (which is the black area in the third of yesterday's pics) a bit further south than it should be.
There is a big compromise where the tracks curve away to the overbridge, though. They should be straight and the bridge much further away, but to do that I'd have never fitted it into either the spare bedroom nor the car. Ditto at the northern end where I had to tighten the curve out of the station to the copper/slate wharf line.

Having made the baseboards and bought the trackwork I then transposed the points only from the plan to the boards and rechecked the alignment before inserting the plain track - all Streamline, I did use a few bits of Setrack for parts of the curves around to the fiddle yard.

It was actually harder to lay out at the northern end, which comprised three long double radius points to combine platform roads 1,2 & 3 and the runround loop into a single line up to the copper/slate wharf. The nearest fit was the long Peco double radius points so that's what I used.

However, having done it all I found that I had an unpleasant looking reverse curve at the north end of platform 3 so settled for a less unpleasant straight in the sweeping curve around the runround loop and changed the point for the longest single radius one. The downside is that the runround loop is shorter than it ought to be but overall it's more pleasing to the eye.
 
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 20, 2019, 07:52:56 AM
Wow thats a feat of civil and model engineering
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 20, 2019, 08:20:15 AM
Wow thats a feat of civil and model engineering

It was a bit of a challenge - especially considering that I'd not done any railway modelling at all for over 40 years and only in OO gauge then - but I don't mind a challenge. Given the choice I'd probably have done it in OO, but I don't have a 20' spare bedroom nor a really enormous car.
If I'd had any sense I'd have done Woodland or Torver - only five points each at those stations  :D

Unexpectedly, I've really warmed to N gauge - to the extent that I now think that OO gauge looks crude in comparison, despite the greater scope for fine detail.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Bealman on April 20, 2019, 08:29:50 AM
That's one thing NewportNobby and I have agreed on for years.  :thumbsup:

To me they look plasticy.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on April 20, 2019, 08:31:23 AM
Unexpectedly, I've really warmed to N gauge - to the extent that I now think that OO gauge looks crude in comparison, despite the greater scope for fine detail.

That happened to me as well.  Ten years ago in the middle of a house move, which involved a lot of building work*, I made a little four by two-and-a-half in 'N' gauge to keep me amused.  The new house has a lovely big train set room* with space for 'H0/00', 'P4' or even '0' if I was careful.  In it, at present, is a large but diminishing US-outline layout, Poppingham (4' x 2'3") and the Table-Top Railway Mark II (2'6" x 2').  All in 'N' gauge!

I don't know why; but I just like 'N'.  The other scale that I find particularly attractive is 'TT'.

Best wishes.

John

* Part of the building work was to have the Train Set Room!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 20, 2019, 07:01:45 PM
looking forward to the next instalment

chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 21, 2019, 12:01:41 PM
looking forward to the next instalment

There will be one, but not until after a brief hiatus, caused by a combination of things - namely, that I've run out of flock and the replenishment order hasn't arrived yet, ditto the glue that I'm using for making the structures.
On top of that, my real foliage is calling to be planted out - which is actually handy because I need to get the greenhouse emptied ready for the tomatoes, cucumbers and melons that are coming on very well under the growlights - and I also see from the schedule that this week is slated down for sowing beans, carrots, parsnips, sweetcorn, courgettes and lettuces. I think trains will have to take a step back for a few days  :(
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 21, 2019, 06:51:20 PM
good luck  with the gardening and the scenics, look forward to the fruits ( and veg ) of your scenics
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on April 24, 2019, 09:45:04 PM
Excellent work,

Some people here were wondering when passenger services might start :D

(https://www.exploresouthlakeland.co.uk/images/filming/800x600/Swallows%20&%20Amazons%20filmography%20-%20ebook_html_795d1a752.jpg)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 24, 2019, 09:52:38 PM
are you in   this period  photo ?
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on April 24, 2019, 09:56:30 PM
are you in   this period  photo ?

No, it's from Swallows and Amazons which is set in the Lake District between 1923 and WW2 (as I understand it) Coniston water, Bowness and parts of Windermere are the main locations, the Coppermines valley just up from Coniston station also features.

If Chrism wishes me to remove the post (and this) I'm happy to do so.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 24, 2019, 09:58:59 PM
its a lovely photo and thanks
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 25, 2019, 06:49:58 AM
are you in   this period  photo ?

No, it's from Swallows and Amazons which is set in the Lake District between 1923 and WW2 (as I understand it) Coniston water, Bowness and parts of Windermere are the main locations, the Coppermines valley just up from Coniston station also features.

If Chrism wishes me to remove the post (and this) I'm happy to do so.

No problem at all, it's in keeping with the subject matter of my layout.

You are correct, it was set in 1929 and the children were based upon the children of some friends of Ransome. The lake in the book was an amalgamation of Coniston Water and Windermere and Wildcat Island, where they camped, was an amalgamation for Peel Island on Coniston Water and Blake Holme on Windermere.

Much of the lake scenes filming in the film, the 1974 one from which your photo is a cast photo, was filmed on Derwentwater as well as Windermere and Coniston Water - Captain Flint's houseboat was actually one of the Keswick Launch cruisers heavily made up.
Most of the filming for the 2016 film (good but not as good as the 1994 one, IMO) was on Derwentwater, but the "island" was actually at Plumpton Rocks, near Harrogate.

You posting the pic gives me a thought or two for some dioramas when the layout's further advanced - maybe the family group on the platform, maybe looking over the fence into the goods yard to watch Swallow being unloaded from a  flat wagon?
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 25, 2019, 07:50:49 AM
good luck with this interesting modelling project
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on April 25, 2019, 01:45:30 PM

No problem at all, it's in keeping with the subject matter of my layout.

You are correct, it was set in 1929 and the children were based upon the children of some friends of Ransome. The lake in the book was an amalgamation of Coniston Water and Windermere and Wildcat Island, where they camped, was an amalgamation for Peel Island on Coniston Water and Blake Holme on Windermere.

Much of the lake scenes filming in the film, the 1974 one from which your photo is a cast photo, was filmed on Derwentwater as well as Windermere and Coniston Water - Captain Flint's houseboat was actually one of the Keswick Launch cruisers heavily made up.
Most of the filming for the 2016 film (good but not as good as the 1994 one, IMO) was on Derwentwater, but the "island" was actually at Plumpton Rocks, near Harrogate.

You posting the pic gives me a thought or two for some dioramas when the layout's further advanced - maybe the family group on the platform, maybe looking over the fence into the goods yard to watch Swallow being unloaded from a  flat wagon?

It was due to Swallows and Amazons that I initially wanted to model Coniston myself, promting a change from 00 to N, but finding the lake so far from the station I turned my attention to Lakeside and started carving from balsa the hull of Tern.

I then got lured into express passenger stock and seaside resort towns, hence Milliedale on Sea, but set on Morcambe bay I do intend on having Swallow and Amazon on the layout.

I do somewhere have a plan of which bits of the lakes Ransome was describing and how they fit together to create the lake, I've been to 'Wild Cat Island twice, once by canoe and once under sail, getting the dinghy straight in the harbour before thinking how I'll get it out again!

Don't forget the parrot and Gibber (the Monkey) perhaps they are on their way to begin the adventures in Great Northern? which is set sailing in the Outer Hebrides, I believe both Swallow and Amazon were taken onboard to be used as ships tenders, but it's some time since I read it I could be confusing it with the flight of fantasy that is 'Missee Lee'
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 25, 2019, 02:12:30 PM

Don't forget the parrot and Gibber (the Monkey) perhaps they are on their way to begin the adventures in Great Northern? which is set sailing in the Outer Hebrides, I believe both Swallow and Amazon were taken onboard to be used as ships tenders, but it's some time since I read it I could be confusing it with the flight of fantasy that is 'Missee Lee'

In Swallows and Amazons, Polly was still Captain Flint's parrot - he gave him to Titty as thanks for finding his stolen trunk. Gibber appeared a few books later, IIRC in Peter Duck.

Amazon was definitely taken as the tender in Peter Duck (not sure about Missee Lee, not my favourite of the books) but I don't think Swallow was used in either - Amazon belonged to the Blacketts whereas Swallow was only borrowed from the farmer at Holly Howe.

I don't recall either being used in Great Northern, the ship they'd borrowed was already suitably equipped with boats IIRC.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 28, 2019, 12:04:06 PM
Well, spring has sprung - in real anger at Coniston even if not in my veggie patch as yet.

Most of the basic scenery is now complete and awaiting further details as and when I think of them. There will be more clump foliage dotted around, when it arrives, and quite a few trees still to be added in the background at the northern end to conceal the disappearing roads and to try and better hide the track as it curves around the the fiddle yard. I am somewhat restricted in height at this end if I'm to be able to fit it all in the car so I may have to resort to inserting "sockets" into which trees can be inserted when it's all set up again.
The slope directly in front of the station also requires trees (quite a lot of them) but I'll leave it for now so that I can work on the station area without demolishing the trees and also so I can determine how high to make them so as to not completely obscure an observer's view of the station.
In both cases I have yet to either learn how to make my own or decide which of the (cheaper) commercially made trees I dislike the least.

In the meantime I've also sorted the platforms properly, with slate facings and top surfaces of edging slabs backed by gravel - except where the station building and train shed will be which, on platform 1, is slabs throughout.

I can now start to make/add the detail items which I couldn't until now because they'd have probably been rapidly demolished as I continued with the basic terrain scenery. I have the loading gauge to paint and fit, ditto the footbridge, water column and signals - the latter to do some experiments to see if I can rig a way of making them flap down and up, but not the ground signals, those are too tiny.
Oh, and I do have one or two buildings to make too.

Anyway, here's a few (or lots of) piccies.
Firstly, a general view looking from the south-east.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-280419104910.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76748)

And a similar one from the north-east.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-280419104937.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76749)

Now a series looking roughly straight-on from the east, this being the station approach and bridge with a Black 5 entering the station with an excursion from Blackpool.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-280419105000.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76750)

The loco yard and turntable with the 3F over the ashpit and the Cauliflower "parked" in what will be the loco shed. 
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-280419105031.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76751)

The southern end of the goods yard with the cattle landing dock and coal yard almost complete.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-280419105104.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76752)

The southern end of the station.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-280419105131.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76753)

And more of the station.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-280419105155.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76754)

The northern end with a Jinty propelling wagons up to the copper/slate wharf up the valley.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-280419105224.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76755)

A closer view of the Jinty as it crosses the bridge over Station Road. I should have hoovered a bit better under the bridge  :doh:
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-280419105253.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76756)

A closer view of the Black 5 passing the loco yard as it enters the station.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-280419105420.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76758)

A higher viewpoint look at the southern end of the layout. Oh dear, those plastic check rails do stand out, and a few areas that are shy on ballast  :(
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-280419105454.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76759)

The 4F waiting to depart with the wagons from Trumpton colliery now that they've been emptied into the coal staithes.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-280419105527.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76760)

A closer view of the cattle loading dock and coal yard.

I think I may have gone a little OTT with the latter, however. The coal staithes use parts of the Ratio ones, topped off with more realistic looking coal and a liberal sprinkling of real coal dust. I still have to add the office building and weighbridge, plus the vehicle crossing over the slate wharf siding in front.

The cattle loading dock is a mixture of the P&D Marsh cattle dock and lineside fencing kits. I needed to use both because their cattle dock kit includes pens for holding the animals whereas the Coniston one doesn't, so the kit was a little heavy on gates and light on plain fencing. However the lineside fencing kit uses the same moulds so I was able to add fencing from that.

The yard crane is not correct for Coniston so it's a "doofa" until I either find a more correct one of suitable bits to make it myself.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-280419105559.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76761)

A closer look at the loco yard and turntable. The 3F is still over the ashpit and the Cauliflower still "parked" in what will be the loco shed.  The wagon on the spur beside the 3F is for disposing of ash whilst the one this side of the turntable is for loco coal. A small coaling platform will go beside that wagon at the far end of the loco shed.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-280419105629.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76762)

A closer view of the station platforms with the Fairburn Tank waiting to take a local train up the line to Foxfield.
I'm quite pleased with the effect of the stone facings and gravel on the platforms - actually printed card and sandpaper. I'm not so pleased with the fence at the back of platform 1, however. Well, the fence itself is fine but the installation is lousy.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-280419105703.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76763)

And, finally, just in case I ever forget where it is I'm supposed to be building. The nameboard came about as a lucky find. One of the chaps at the club was looking through a box of papers and stuff and found an envelope labelled "Coniston Station" containing a CD. When I looked on it I found it had quite a few useful photos of the station shortly before closure and during demolition, including one almost square-on of the nameboard. I took that one and colourised it to make the model nameboard.

At times I really hate cameras, they are very adept at showing up flaws that one didn't see before. That flipping fencing really is all over the place and will have to be redone, whilst the nameboard is slightly pi**ed on its frame  :(
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-280419105725.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=76764)

Well, that's all folks. Hope you enjoyed it and thanks for looking.
Most future updates will, I dare say, be more concentrating on details as I get them made and added.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 28, 2019, 01:11:45 PM
thank you for the updates. the trees are fantastic, very much hide the baseboard edges, the scenics really give a feel for the locality / area and the ballasting is superb.

the locomotives are very crisply lettered picked out depicting the LMS in that black livery. chris,seriously impressed how well developed this proect is.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 28, 2019, 01:38:25 PM
thank you for the updates. the trees are fantastic, very much hide the baseboard edges, the scenics really give a feel for the locality / area and the ballasting is superb.

Thanks, mate. The clump foliage was specifically put in place to hide the joins but I was pleasantly surprised by how well just the flocked surfaces did it too.

Quote
chris,seriously impressed how well developed this proect is.

Staggered is the word I'd use. Six months ago, when I was just getting ready to order the first bits I'd never have guessed I'd have got this far by now considering that I hadn't done any railway modelling for about 40 years, never in N Gauge and never having attempted to do so much with it.

.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 28, 2019, 01:49:10 PM
Chris. Staggered, stunoed. Wow. Speechless. Its worthy of being published. . Exhibited. For somebody returning to modelling wow. Keep up the good work. Its an excuse if ever in lancaster to visit. Chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on April 28, 2019, 02:28:59 PM
Thank you very much indeed for that excellent post.  You are making truly splendid progress.

With all best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Newportnobby on April 28, 2019, 04:21:41 PM
Excellent work, Chris.


At times I really hate cameras, they are very adept at showing up flaws that one didn't see before.


That's what make digital cameras so useful as shots can be easily deleted. Use the camera to your advantage i.e. take your pic and check it for any flaws, correct the flaw and then delete the pic :)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 28, 2019, 04:57:58 PM
Thank you very much indeed for that excellent post.  You are making truly splendid progress.

Thanks, John. I certainly seem to be getting there.

Excellent work, Chris.

Thanks, Mick.

Quote
At times I really hate cameras, they are very adept at showing up flaws that one didn't see before.

That's what make digital cameras so useful as shots can be easily deleted. Use the camera to your advantage i.e. take your pic and check it for any flaws, correct the flaw and then delete the pic :)

I always do check for flaws - oh, you meant flaws in the subject, not the pic itself  ;D
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 28, 2019, 05:01:09 PM
the platforms look good too
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 29, 2019, 06:28:52 AM
the platforms look good too

Thanks mate. They certainly beat plywood facing s and a painted black top surface  :)

There are a couple of uneven edges where I found the Fairburn's combination lever fouled them but not too bad and not too noticable. The slabs are card overlapping the faces a little so, if I get anything else that fouls them, it shouldn't be hard to trim them back a bit more.

I've fixed the fence on platform 1 now - just needed a gauge to prevent the long posts going further down the holes than the length of the short ones. Looks a lot better now - but that wouldn't have been hard.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 29, 2019, 09:01:37 AM
Thanks chris. I read in model rail the tutorials. What materials did you use please to construct your platforms? More realistic than the tacky ones in the shops. Thank you for tutorials. Stunning layout. Chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: daffy on April 29, 2019, 10:35:13 AM
Wonderful photos Chris and a most accomplished creation. :thumbsup:

As already asked, I too would be interested in how you built those excellent platforms.

I shall be in Coniston in less than two weeks for a holiday, but sadly steam locos will be absent from my photos, though I do hope to once again travel on the steam launch Gondola.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on April 29, 2019, 12:21:03 PM
What materials did you use please to construct your platforms? More realistic than the tacky ones in the shops.
As already asked, I too would be interested in how you built those excellent platforms.

I started off trying to cut 9mm plywood to the right shape but soon gave up with that idea after failing with just the single-sided platform 1.

Pan B, however, worked;

Still using 9mm ply, I cut strips around 5-6mm wide and made a gauge to set how far outside a rail the platform faces needed to be, allowing for covering the faces with thin card later and for having a slight overhang for the top surface edging slabs.

Then I started at one end of a platform face and superglued a ply strip down on the back of the strip, just at that end, at the gauged distance. Once that was set (not very long with the glue I use) I moved along a couple of inches, pulled the ply strip round to fit the gauge and glued it, then repeated every couple of inches until I'd reached the end. Finally, I ran a fillet of glue along the whole  back edge of the ply strip and repeated the exercise for all the other faces.

Once it was all set and tested with all my stock, I filled in between the two faces for each platform/island - initially with any suitable wood offcuts and finally with filler to give me a flattish top surface. I made the end ramps from plastikard.

When it came to decorating them, I covered the platform faces with some of my "walls" scenic card. For the top surfaces I started out by cutting strips of 80 grit sandpaper to be 3mm back from the now faced platform edges on both sides and glued those down - if you've ever wanted to know the best way to blunt a scalpel blade that is it, use it to cut sandpaper. I went through a blade per cut, good job my last supply replenishment was a box of 100.

For the edging slabs I selected a suitable stone from the photos I took at the real Coniston and resized it to print out at 4mm square, then copied/pasted/aligned the copies to give me entire A4 sheets and printed those out. I then glued each sheet to a blank sheet because the 160gsm card I use in my printer is only about half as thick as the sandpaper and cut strips of the "slabs" one wide before gluing those into place, bending them around as needed.

Finally I ran all my stock through again to check for fouling - the only offender being the Fairburn tank whereby the combination lever of the valve gear stuck out enough to foul in a couple of places so I trimmed the edge of the "slabs" back to get clearance all the way along.

Wonderful photos Chris and a most accomplished creation. :thumbsup:

Cheers, mate.

I shall be in Coniston in less than two weeks for a holiday, but sadly steam locos will be absent from my photos, though I do hope to once again travel on the steam launch Gondola.

If you fancy it, and have the time, it's surprising how much of the old station site is still there and recognisable, when you know what to look for. The site itself was demolished and replaced with light industrial units at the station end, housing at the southern end. However, the entire eastern retaining wall is still present and, as far as I can see, the cliffs above the goods yard are also largely unchanged with the exception of heavy duty debris netting added. The overbridge at the south end is still there but the underbridge for Station Road is long gone. The slate wharf is pretty well all still in situ, half of it now being the public pay & display car park, while the slate office building itself is both still in place and in pretty good condition.

BTW, if you do go on Gondola, I can strongly recommend the Bluebird Cafe (by the pier from which Gondola sails at Coniston) for light or heavier refreshment before or after your trip :)
The cafe was originally housed in the crew quarters building that the Furness Railway built but, unfortunately, was badly damaged in the floods of 2009 so was demolished and a new purpose-built building replaced it.


Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on April 29, 2019, 12:41:20 PM
Thanks for the tutorial. All remains is the surface top to describe, platform furniture, loco water crane, porters, train crew, passengers
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 03, 2019, 06:53:50 AM
Thanks for the tutorial. All remains is the surface top to describe, platform furniture, loco water crane, porters, train crew, passengers

All that requires is a bench on platform 1, another in the middle of the platforms 2/3 island, the footbridge and the starting signal for platform 2. People, luggage, junk, etc. can wait for now since most of the platforms will be covered by the train shed so that needs to be done first.

The water column (not a crane in this instance) sits off the northern end of the platform 2/3 island and is done, so will feature in the next update photos. That needed some modification of the kit parts.

I'm currently working on the signals, also for the next update. The starters are already done, as is the tall home for the goods yard entry (*) and the "clear to enter the single line section" home. I'm now working on the  tall 3-doll home indicating clear to enter the station and on which platform the train will be arriving. All bar two of the starters needed modification too, the tall ones quite a lot of it, actually.

(*) I'm not sure that that signal is actually for the goods yard entry, as my book describes, since there is a ground signal for that purpose and, anyway, the post is on the wrong side of the track. I think it's actually for the loops either side of the signal box and the runround loop. It may be that those routes were where freight trains were put on arrival before being shunted into the yard or up to the copper/slate wharf up the valley and that is to what the book is referring.

The next job will be the footbridge, or at least starting it, because I need that in place to be able to guesstimate the dimensions for the train shed - I have photos showing the two nicely lined up so when I know the height above the rails for the footbridge I can work out how high the clearance under the end of the train shed will be. Again, the footbridge kit needs quite significant modification from the supplied version.

I plan on making a rudimentary frame for the train shed first, which will plug either onto posts sticking up from the platforms or into holes in them because it has to be removable - firstly, it spans a baseboard join, and secondly, the building will be too tall for the boards to stack and still fit in the car. When the frame is done and proven to fit (and to survive the boards being taken apart) I can clad it with the actual building parts.

Actually, I will be making two rudimentary frames, the second to be the framework for the train shed and buildings and the first to be a shelf - now I've done all the scenic areas I no longer have anywhere to put tools, etc. so that's where they can go ;)

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 03, 2019, 07:16:27 AM
Chris. Impressed with the  speed and development on coniston. Be good to hear progress on those signals and structure. . . Sounds like you have a well thumbed and used reference book. .
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 03, 2019, 08:20:56 AM
Chris. Impressed with the  speed and development on coniston. Be good to hear progress on those signals and structure. . . Sounds like you have a well thumbed and used reference book. .

The spine is getting rather weak, I think it may end up going in a ring binder  :D
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 03, 2019, 08:30:39 AM
chris


do you use kits for the signals please ?
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 03, 2019, 09:54:49 AM
do you use kits for the signals please ?

Yep, what I'm making are based on the Langley Models square post lower quadrant range with, for a start, the GWR finials hacked off  :D
I'll give the details of what I've had to do for each when I post some pics, so the modifications have visual relevance.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 03, 2019, 10:05:42 AM
Thank you. Chris. Happy modelling
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: daffy on May 03, 2019, 03:09:11 PM
Hi Chris, and sorry for the tardy reply as Iíve been busy decorating the kitchen.

Thanks for the details descriptions f your progress, which are most informative and instructional. :hmmm: Fast progress being made - a lot faster than my kitchen works! :-[

I shall certainly visit the Station Road location to get a feel of what was once there during our stay from next Friday, probably on one of those dull wet days the Lakes are known for, keeping me off the mountains. :D
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 03, 2019, 03:36:21 PM
I shall certainly visit the Station Road location to get a feel of what was once there during our stay from next Friday, probably on one of those dull wet days the Lakes are known for, keeping me off the mountains. :D

If you fancy meeting up there, it's only half an hour or so away for me.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: daffy on May 04, 2019, 01:24:49 PM
Thanks Chris, that would be good to have someone on hand who knows precisely whatís what.
Iíll PM you with contact details next week, but arrangements will be a little last minute as I never plan exactly what weíll do on holidays, especially in the UK.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 04, 2019, 01:31:06 PM
If like windermere grasmere ambleside. Lakeside and haverthwaite railway b potter museum. So much to do
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: daffy on May 04, 2019, 01:41:45 PM
If like windermere grasmere ambleside. Lakeside and haverthwaite railway b potter museum. So much to do


The L&HR will probably get a visit, but itís the hills that call me, while my wife visits the towns and places weíve known over many years of visits. I might join her for one day of grockelling. ;)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 04, 2019, 02:08:49 PM
Thanks Chris, that would be good to have someone on hand who knows precisely whatís what.
Iíll PM you with contact details next week, but arrangements will be a little last minute as I never plan exactly what weíll do on holidays, especially in the UK.

Bit tricky planning too far in advance up here, the weather almost always interferes  :D

I'm a volunteer driver for our community transport scheme so I'll have to work around any bookings I have/get - at present I can say that I'm definitely unavailable on Mondays before around 14:30 and Wednesdays & Thursdays before around 12:30, both those times being the likely earliest that I could get to Coniston.
I currently have no other bookings but that could change.


Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: class37025 on May 04, 2019, 02:23:18 PM
"grockelling"  :confused1:

please, this is a family forum with very strict mods  :telloff:

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 04, 2019, 03:31:22 PM
I used to visit the beatrix potter museum and in the old days travel on my rover ticket the settle and carlisle, anything from a 25, 31 ,40, 45, 47 could turn up. The postal van could pick up passengers for keswick.  or a trip via barrow from lancaster to workington. Heady days
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 04, 2019, 03:43:34 PM
anything from a 25, 31 ,40, 45, 47 could turn up.

Wash your mouth out, Coniston was diseasel-free and so's my version of it  ;D
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 04, 2019, 03:49:29 PM
I did mean a jinty, a 3f and a 4f chris. Look forward to the next instalment. .
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: daffy on May 04, 2019, 04:01:46 PM
"grockelling"  :confused1:

please, this is a family forum with very strict mods  :telloff:

I know not what connotation you may give to the ancient art practised by the seasoned grockle, but throughout my happy life, this term, introduced to me on a family holiday to Cornwall before I was out of short trousers, has always had a simple meaning: grockel (or grockle) = a tourist from another part of the country; and hence grockelling means touring about, visiting the sites etc.

Okay, so some may use the term in a derogatory way towards those who invade their areas, but I shall continue unabashed and unashamed to be a grockel, go a-grockelling, and encourage others to grockel wherever they may go. :P
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: class37025 on May 04, 2019, 04:05:46 PM
many thanks for clearing this up !

never heard this term before, but then I have obviously led a sheltered life  :smiley-laughing:

never got my passport stamped by Cornish C&E, so that may explain my concerns.

happly grockelling  :bounce:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: daffy on May 04, 2019, 04:09:03 PM
 :beers:

My brother reminds me we were on holiday in our short trousers in Devon, not Cornwall, but itís origin matters not.

 :beers:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 04, 2019, 04:24:21 PM
I did mean a jinty, a 3f and a 4f chris.

Slip of the fingers, eh?
 :no:

Quote
Look forward to the next instalment. .

It's coming - I'm still kitbashing at present. The signals are done as far as I can for now so I've moved on to the footbridge, yet another challenge. It would have been anyway if I'd just made it as designed but, no, I've had to alter that too  :D

During the glue drying/setting spells I've also started on the station building, goods shed and train shed - just the initial work for now, so I can design/build the framework over which the final thing will be eventually built. I've got the ends sorted, now I'm researching the wall between platforms 2 & 3 so I can get the windows located correctly in the hope that I can find a suitable straight line for the framework longitudinal beam without it being visible through any windows.


Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 04, 2019, 04:30:18 PM
no was just interrupted by the noisy neighbour......
and yes.your layout is beautiful,chris. be lovely to hear how your doing with the buildings. having spoken to those who scratchbuild it takes time.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 04, 2019, 06:05:02 PM
no was just interrupted by the noisy neighbour......
and yes.your layout is beautiful,chris. be lovely to hear how your doing with the buildings. having spoken to those who scratchbuild it takes time.

The challenge at the moment is to make a credible representation of the train shed, working from only about half a dozen photos, of which the most detailed is this;
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Coniston-Lake-Railway-Station-Photo-Torver-Woodland-and-Foxfield-Line-7-/261526843911 (https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Coniston-Lake-Railway-Station-Photo-Torver-Woodland-and-Foxfield-Line-7-/261526843911)

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 04, 2019, 06:16:44 PM
what a beautiful station, would spend hours admiring,walking round if it still existed.  if  helps i found these leads :

https://www.flickr.com/photos/72213853@N03/6539241909 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/72213853@N03/6539241909)

https://heritagephotoarchive.co.uk/p309958789/h32e7f9cb#h32e7f9cb (https://heritagephotoarchive.co.uk/p309958789/h32e7f9cb#h32e7f9cb)

http://www.cumbria-railways.co.uk/cumbria_railway_photograph_collection.html (http://www.cumbria-railways.co.uk/cumbria_railway_photograph_collection.html)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: daffy on May 04, 2019, 06:35:48 PM
No photo problems for your footbridge of course Chris  :no:  - just nip over the hills to Ravenglass to see the Coniston original. :)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 04, 2019, 06:41:56 PM
what a beautiful station, would spend hours admiring,walking round if it still existed.  if  helps i found these leads :

Cheers mate. I've already found them, however.

The problem is that most photos are taken from, for example, on a platform so are very oblique views of the building.
One that isn't so was in the book I first bought (and also on the web) and shows the station from on top of the church tower in Coniston village - near as dammit a perfect side-on view which, although lacking in detail and showing nothing below the canopy over platform 3 (because of the trees on the bank in front) does give me the rooflines and proportions for positioning the dormer windows, etc.;


(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/7182-040519184112.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77000)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 04, 2019, 06:44:48 PM
i saw these :

https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/browse/r/h/16f2082d-97a5-4d85-99d6-0cc05259858d (https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/browse/r/h/16f2082d-97a5-4d85-99d6-0cc05259858d)

clsest shot i can see c 1957 footbridge

http://www.cumbria-railways.co.uk/cumbria_railway_photograph_collection.html (http://www.cumbria-railways.co.uk/cumbria_railway_photograph_collection.html)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 04, 2019, 06:46:40 PM
chris

good luck with this. be worth the end product
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 04, 2019, 08:16:05 PM
i saw these :

[url]https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/browse/r/h/16f2082d-97a5-4d85-99d6-0cc05259858d[/url] ([url]https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/browse/r/h/16f2082d-97a5-4d85-99d6-0cc05259858d[/url])

clsest shot i can see c 1957 footbridge

[url]http://www.cumbria-railways.co.uk/cumbria_railway_photograph_collection.html[/url] ([url]http://www.cumbria-railways.co.uk/cumbria_railway_photograph_collection.html[/url])


Cheers mate. I've gone for the Langley kit of the Midland bridge that used to be at Bakewell. It's not completely correct but after my modifications it'll be close enough. Better than if I'd tried scratchbuilding TBH.


Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 04, 2019, 08:23:35 PM
i was unsure chris, if you knew of this information or had seen these sites or photos. very historic and interesting. wish you well and chris,enjoy the selection of materials
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 07, 2019, 02:54:31 PM
Well, as I said a few days ago, I've mostly been kitbashing and here's the chamber of horrors;

Exhibit A is the water column.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-070519135908.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77113)
This started out life as a P&D Marsh M.R. Ground Mounted Water Crane kit and was the closest that I could find to suit the original; at Coniston - with some modification.
The kit crane has a swan-neck swinging arm for reaching centrally mounted tender water fillers.  however the one at Coniston didn't have a swinging arm, presumably because the locos stabled there were all tank locos so had fillers right at their sides. I assume that visiting tender locos would have filled up elsewhere.
Anyway, the kit was easily modified to better represent the Coniston column, by cutting off the swan-neck arm and the canvas "bag" from the end of that, and glueing the bag directly to the column with a length of
rod inserted so that the bag hung right down to the ground. I also had to cut the base so that the drain sits closer to the column.

The column isn't permanently fitted yet - too much risk of knocking it off or worse while I'm still working in the area. Before I do glue it down I'd better revisit the join between the paint colours.

Exhibit B - the footbridge;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-070519135943.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77114)
This started out as a kit based on the Midland Railway lattice bridge at originally at Bakewell which whilst not correct for Coniston was the one I felt I stood the best chance of getting closer.
This required the length changing to halfway between the shorter and longer options in the kit, the height reducing and the stairs altering to remove the half-landings halfway up the flights.

I'll be the first to admit that it's far from perfect, being the most fiddly kit I've yet tried - but it'll do for now.

Exhibit C - the loading gauge;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-070519140007.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77115)
A bog-standard Ratio one, not the perfect design for Coniston but acceptable.

Exhibit D - signals;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-070519140039.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77116)
These three starting signals for platforms 3 & 2 (with the one for platform 1 in the background) are the Langley Models Single post Lower quadrant kits with the only required mod being to lop a bit off the bottom of the one for platform 2 because it sits on the platform, not the ground. Oh, and for all the signals, removing the GWR finials  >:D

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-070519140104.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77117)
These two required significant mods - for a start, increasing significantly in height because the arms of which we can see the backs needed to be visible over the bridge.

The left-hand one was a Langley Single Post 2 Aspects kit which needed both increasing in height and one of the arms turning around - the arm facing away signalled that an approaching train would be entering, according to my book, the goods yard but I suspect it really meant the loop lines either side of the signal box because a) there was a ground signal for entering the goods yard and b) this post puts the arm on the wrong side of the track. Anyway, the mods were done by cutting off the relevant detail parts of the kit and rejoining them using suitable lengths of brass tube.

The right-hand 3-doll job took a bit more work. It started out as Langley's Triple Post Bracket kit which actually has four arms (two on the middle post) all at different heights, whereas the three-doll one at Coniston had them all at the same height. The mods were done in a similar way to above using more of the brass tube.

Ladders and fencing around the 3-doll bracket platform will be added when I plant the signals permenently.

I hope to be able to get the semaphore arms flapping up and down from the control panel but haven't tested my thoughts as to how I could do that yet, mainly because the components are on a slow boat from China.  For the time being, I've set them all at "clear". Whilst, technically, that means that I should be strictly observing the one engine in steam rule, which I won't, that is preferable to having most movements resulting in a SPAD.
 
The eagle-eyed may have spotted a ground signal in the first signals pic, I have no intention of trying to make those work.

Exhibit E - a train shed;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-070519140130.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77118)
Oops, not that one. I haven't envisaged a '60s rebuild using brutalist architecture - really, that's my tool shelf which sits on the same locating tubes as the proper train shed will. I made it because, now I've scenified everywhere I've run out of places to put my tools  :laugh3:


Here's the first development of the proper one, overall view;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-070519140155.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77119)

Closer view of the southern end;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-070519140223.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77120)

and of the northern end;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-070519140245.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77121)

Because it a) spans a board joint and b) will be too tall for when I stack the boards to go in the car, the station buiding, train shed and goods shed structure needs to be removable. The first thing I needed to do was make a rigid framework because the two sides are only joined by the roof so I've made a framework from plywood and brass rod/tube which can then be clad with the real walls and rooves.

The ends are just my first stage designs to make sure they fit before I draw them up properly in Photoshop for printing and assembly. That will keep me busy  :laugh3:

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 07, 2019, 02:57:37 PM
No photo problems for your footbridge of course Chris  :no:  - just nip over the hills to Ravenglass to see the Coniston original. :)

I can't, they took it out some years ago and, when I asked recently , the people there thought it had either been sold or scrapped but didn't know which for sure.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: daffy on May 07, 2019, 03:18:23 PM
No photo problems for your footbridge of course Chris  :no:  - just nip over the hills to Ravenglass to see the Coniston original. :)

I can't, they took it out some years ago and, when I asked recently , the people there thought it had either been sold or scrapped but didn't know which for sure.

Sacrilege !  :o.

I suppose it probably got to be an expensive restoration job for them. Sad all the same.
Like your kit bashed alternative that certainly looks the part. A fiddly structure I would not have the eyes and fingers to build.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 07, 2019, 03:20:21 PM
Thank you for the updates. Stunning structures and on  such a beautiful layout they are taking shape. really like the signals and the train shed
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 07, 2019, 03:29:28 PM
No photo problems for your footbridge of course Chris  :no:  - just nip over the hills to Ravenglass to see the Coniston original. :)

I can't, they took it out some years ago and, when I asked recently , the people there thought it had either been sold or scrapped but didn't know which for sure.

Sacrilege !  :o.

I suppose it probably got to be an expensive restoration job for them. Sad all the same.

They took it out when they remodelled Ravenglass station and, presumably no longer had a need for it.

Quote
Like your kit bashed alternative that certainly looks the part. A fiddly structure I would not have the eyes and fingers to build.

Thanks - I barely had them either ;)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on May 10, 2019, 08:48:20 AM
Really starting to come together, it's been a while since I looked at photos of Coniston in detail other than those in this thread, it's really starting to come together and look like the real place.

Slightly envious that in the space of a year or so you've got far further than I have in four years!  :'(
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 10, 2019, 08:59:02 AM
Really starting to come together, it's been a while since I looked at photos of Coniston in detail other than those in this thread, it's really starting to come together and look like the real place.

Slightly envious that in the space of a year or so you've got far further than I have in four years!  :'(

Thanks, mate. I'm working on the train shed now, that'll really make it look like it should - I hope.

Actually, it's been less than a year - I ordered the first of the materials for the baseboard on November 1st so it's been going extremely well, to my own surprise  TBH.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 10, 2019, 09:33:29 AM
We look forward to the next instalmemt of such a beautiful layout
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: joe cassidy on May 10, 2019, 12:11:39 PM
Your layout promises to be what us cocknies call a "reet bobby dazzler" :)

Best regards,


Joe
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: port perran on May 10, 2019, 12:16:28 PM
Just catching up again after missing this thread for a week or two.
Excellent progress I must say.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Bealman on May 10, 2019, 12:19:36 PM
Echo what's been said above. Brilliant.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 10, 2019, 03:44:59 PM
Thanks guys, hope I can live up to your expectations  :thumbsup:

There will be a few week's partial hiatus in a fortnight or so - we're having an open day at the club and the lads want me to take it down for that. Since I haven't yet taken it anywhere apart from (as the separated boards) to another room I'll be taking it down two weeks in advance to make sure that it all a) comes apart OK now I've added the scenery, b) still fits the transport casings, c) actually does fit in the car, d) goes back together properly - and didn't fall apart too much - and e) is all set up and working in time for the open day.

However, that hopefully won't mean a complete break in the work/progress. With any luck I'll have got the basic framework for the combined station building, train shed and goods shed structure to a stage where I can continue with it without it needing to be physically on the layout - then I'll take whatever I have down to the club put in place for the open day.

These are the photoshop images for the train shed ends as far as they go.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-100519153229.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77252)

The colour scheme is, as far as I can judge, the Furness Railway colours because, although I am modelling it in the late 1930s, the LMS didn't start repainting stations in their own livery until the mid 1930s so it's not impossible that they hadn't got around to Coniston by the late '30s.

I still have to add the slate walls to replace the flat grey areas but I'm working on the east wall (platform 3 and the viewing side) first to make sure that it will both fit and match the ends. That is involving a huge amount of guesswork since all I have from which to work, apart from the length it needs to be, is one long distance photo giving me the approximate side profile for locating the various ridgelines & gable ends and an assortment of closer photos but from very oblique angles, e.g. standing on the edge of platform 3.

Hopefully it'll work out pretty close to what it ought to in the end.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Newportnobby on May 10, 2019, 08:44:34 PM
Good luck with a) through to e) and I hope there's no f) involved ;)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 10, 2019, 09:09:20 PM
Good luck with a) through to e) and I hope there's no f) involved ;)

So do I - if there is an f involved I dare say it'll be prefixed with an o  :D
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 10, 2019, 09:51:13 PM
thought point ( f ) could be / maybe the positive / constructive comments by your peers / fellow club  members that your due.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 11, 2019, 05:44:37 AM
thought point ( f ) could be / maybe the positive / constructive comments by your peers / fellow club  members that your due.

One can always hope  :claphappy:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Flakmunky on May 11, 2019, 05:50:32 AM
Great thread and a great model. Thanks for sharing.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 11, 2019, 06:14:19 AM
Hope its well received chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on May 12, 2019, 05:12:39 PM
Hope the moving it to the club rooms goes well (please let us know)

If, in the future, it's being exhibited anywhere near Manchester I'll be coming to see it in the flesh (and happy to operate for a bit if you like so you can grab a butty)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 12, 2019, 05:17:11 PM
Agreed please let us know if exhhbition invites in the nw pour in sure myself and newport nobby mick will be round
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 13, 2019, 07:12:33 AM
Hope the moving it to the club rooms goes well (please let us know)

Will do - unless it was a complete failure  :-[

Quote
If, in the future, it's being exhibited anywhere near Manchester I'll be coming to see it in the flesh (and happy to operate for a bit if you like so you can grab a butty)
Agreed please let us know if exhhbition invites in the nw pour in sure myself and newport nobby mick will be round

Crikey, I haven't given that any thought whatsoever.

It'll need a hell of a lot more work before it's fit for that. Apart from the visual aspect of the public-facing side, the control panel will need remaking, especially if I do get the signals flapping down and up remotely, and the indicator light circuit board finishing and wiring in.

Also, if I'm completely honest, the whole layout could do with rewiring to aid fault finding should the law of s*d rear its ugly head. Most of the original rat's nest of wiring is now simply a tie-wrapped rat's nest, with more added, so it could really do with the wires laying out neatly and looming according to function, etc.

I've also got to sort out uncoupling so it can be operated as it should be - for the open day I'll just run it as a roundy-roundy but for serious demonstration I need to bring trains in, uncouple, run round and depart to the same end - 5-coach passenger excursion never went up to the copper wharf  :no:

I guess it may make it to the club's exhibition that is being considered for next year, and Millom is fairly near to Manchester, we even have a direct train connection I believe.


Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 13, 2019, 07:18:18 AM
Good luck with the wiring. Is there not a direct barrow to manchester service? Maybe your own club layout holiding its exhibition is a good starting point
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 13, 2019, 07:52:19 AM
Good luck with the wiring. Is there not a direct barrow to manchester service?

There is - and a few trains carry on to Millom and on up to Carlisle along the Cumbrian Coast line without needing to change at Barrow.

Quote
Maybe your own club layout holiding its exhibition is a good starting point

I think so too.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 13, 2019, 07:13:43 PM
The station building is now almost at the stage where I can continue to work on it without having the layout underneath so I can start to take the baseboards apart to deal with a few little jobs hat need to be done before it goes down to the club.

Before I do, however, here are some pics of the partially completed station building so that you can get an idea of what it will look like;

The south end;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-130519184121.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77389)

the north end;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-130519184215.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77390)

and looking straight on the side;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-130519184247.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77391)

The roofs are just sheets of card plonked on for now. I have to make the sides of the dormers first before I can put the proper tiled roofs on, as well as the far sides of the two roof levels on the train shed and the roofs for the goods shed and station building itself.

The approximately central tower has louvres on all three sides (the fourth being level with the ridge of the extension to the train shed) for ventilation. One of my books claims that it was to give ventilation for the gents lavatory, however I'm not so sure. Firstly, unless it was relocated, the gents was at the northern end of the station building on the opposite side of, and almost at the very northern end of, the train shed and, secondly, that tower would provide a heck of a lot of ventilation. I'm more of the view that it was actually to let smoke and steam out, especially since a good 50% of it is over the tracks.

The dormers with their tall windows were solely to allow light into the train shed, supplemented by the smaller, lower windows and a glazed section along part of the western facing side of the roof on the original, northern, half of the shed. The southern half doesn't appear to have glazing in the roof but a couple of photos indicate a raised strip along most of its length  - I suspect that was also for ventilation, the prevailing wind would blow in through such a vent with the louvres in the tower letting it back out, along with the smoke & steam.

I'm afraid that the addition of the train shed means that the curved platform fans will have to settle for the excessively curved platform 3 or peek through the windows at the sides and ends of the train shed. Any complaints about this should be made to the descendants of Mssrs. Paley and Austin, the architects responsible for it.

 
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 13, 2019, 07:26:40 PM
chris


thank you for  sharing stunning photos of your architecture.

just feel im standing at the scene in amazement - so beautiful
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on May 13, 2019, 07:27:41 PM
Absolutely fabulous!

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 14, 2019, 06:04:33 AM
Thanks guys, it's certainly starting to look like what it should.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 14, 2019, 06:14:54 AM
Morning chris. Was plastikard used? Constructing that structure and those platforms must have been a challenge. The photns give it a real feel for the place
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 14, 2019, 07:11:21 AM
Morning chris. Was plastikard used? Constructing that structure and those platforms must have been a challenge. The photns give it a real feel for the place

Good morning, no, not much plastikard so far.

The platforms were made as I described further back up the thread;
https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=43692.msg566014#msg566014 (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=43692.msg566014#msg566014)
I did use a bit of plastikard for the platform ramps but that's all.

The station buildings and train shed structure is all card, in much the same way as I did the bridge at the southern end and all the walls on the scenery.

I designed each part in Photoshop (other graphics software is available) and printed it out onto a good quality 160gsm card with my laser printer, then stuck the resulting print onto thick, 2-2.5mm, fairly dense card (actually the liners from old ring binders, simply because that's what I had available) before sticking the various parts together. The slate walls are from my photos of various walls taken on site. This method gives me a far better end result than my painting skill would if I were to have used plastikard - it also means that If I make a mistake (eg cut something too far) I can simply print out another copy.

For the windows in the dormers and the louvres in the tower, I printed each piece out twice, cutting the frames area out of one and the glazed areas out of the other before glueing the two together and then onto the backing card so that the frames are recessed a little behind the wall - not that it shows up much at this scale. The thick card had even larger holes cut out of it so I could insert the glazing material - some form of clear, rigid plastic that I had to hand.

The glue I'm using is what I've found to be a rather good cyanoacrylate - pretty quick but not not too quick setting with a degree of gap filling and sticks like crazy. Once it's set the only way to get things apart is to destroy one, if not both, surfaces. It's the use of this glue that has allowed me to progress so quickly, because the "wait for drying" time is so short.

Because this structure has to be removable - it spans a baseboard joint - just card alone isn't, I feel, going to be durable enough considering that the only connection between the two sides is the train shed roof. The same applies to plastikard, I think. Therefore I made a framework comprising a strip of 5mm plywood inside the walls either side of the train shed, linked with lengths of brass rod/tube bent to shape. The end ones are inserted into holes drilled vertically down through the ply strips and give the overall strength whilst another three are simply glued to the top edge of the ply to prevent the walls flexing. Two more are glued on to as diagonals to keep the structure square. Finally, I have two brass rod pegs sticking out from the bottom of the platform 2/3 wall which engage in tubes let into the platform to ensure that the structure goes back in the right place and doesn't move around.
The card walls are then glued to the plywood ones.

When it's finished I have some work to do to fit it to the baseboard neatly. It sits on the platforms fine but I didn't get some of the ground levels behind correct so will need to build the ground up in some places so that the structure sits properly on the ground as well. I will have to cheat in one aspect, unfortunately. I didn't realise that the slate wharf track was actually on a higher elevation than the platform tracks, so I can't now get the station entrance level with the ground, it'll have to have steps up to it  :veryangry:

One great thing with doing the walls in Photoshop (other graphics software is available)  is that I can do all sorts of fun things should I wish. For example, I've put a load of posters and noticeboards along the visible inside wall of the train shed, adding them to the print instead of sticking them on afterwards.
 The very front one, a chalkboard, actually reads "Millom Railway and Scale Modellers Open Day June 1st 10am to 4pm All welcome" and really is legible provided that one has 100/20 vision or very strong specs and a magnifying glass  :laugh3:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 14, 2019, 07:38:11 AM
thank you.i must have missed that bit of thethread. nevertheless impressive stuff
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 14, 2019, 07:48:07 AM
thank you.i must have missed that bit of thethread. nevertheless impressive stuff

No, you must have forgotten about it - because you thanked me for it in the very next post  :P

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 14, 2019, 07:51:05 AM
must have done. just need some real coal for those private owner wagons chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 14, 2019, 08:18:05 AM
must have done. just need some real coal for those private owner wagons chris

In hand - well, in a jar for now :thumbsup:

Don't want too much actually. In retrospect, I overfilled the coal staithes in the yard so another delivery so soon would look rather odd. The majority of the Trumpton set will have to appear that they've just been unloaded.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: port perran on May 14, 2019, 08:23:27 AM
That is all looking extremely good.
I love the station with its overall roof and curved platform on the outside which make the whole thing pleasing to the eye and which is something a bit unusual and different from the norm.
Excellent progress.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 14, 2019, 08:39:20 AM
That is all looking extremely good.

Thanks, I'm pleased with the way it's going.

Quote
I love the station with its overall roof and curved platform on the outside which make the whole thing pleasing to the eye and which is something a bit unusual and different from the norm.

That was one of the attractions that lead to me deciding to have a go at it - along with the surprisingly complex track layout and the fact that it's relatively local to me, only about half an hour's drive away even on the less than optimum roads we have around here.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 14, 2019, 08:56:01 AM
Agree with martin. Pp. Curved roof looks superb
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 14, 2019, 11:02:47 AM
Curved roof looks superb

Hmm, that's a tad annoying, it's supposed to be straight
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 14, 2019, 11:16:30 AM
Im not good with architecture. I meant the bit just under the roof just above the trains' roofs . The curved bit what i meant
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 14, 2019, 12:03:21 PM
Im not good with architecture. I meant the bit just under the roof just above the trains' roofs . The curved bit what i meant

Ah, you mean the arch at the northern end.
Phew, I thought you meant that I'd managed to get (and failed to notice) a curve in the entire structure.

The original train shed was only about half the length and both ends had flat-topped openings in the screens similar to, but smaller than, that at the southern end as shown in my model. The north end opening was even smaller because only platform 1 was a through road. Platform 2 ended at stop blocks just before the screen. At that time the front of the train shed ended level with the back of the goods shed, which was a separate structure.

A bit under 20 years after opening, they extended the platform 2 road to be a second through road, as well as roughly doubling the length of the entire train shed, by lining the front up with the front of the goods shed (also enlarging that) and combining the goods shed, station building and train shed into a single structure. However, the original screen at the northern end was too narrow to accommodate two through lines and platforms so they put in the arch, constructed from old rails, and filled in between that and the roof with timber and windows.

I like the way they did it, TBH. The two ends have similarity but also a nice contrast in appearance.

The extremely curved third platform was added about 4 years later, along with a waiting shelter and canopy attached to the outside of the train shed. Because of the extreme curvature, that platform wasn't very popular with the operators and didn't get a lot of use, apparently.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 14, 2019, 12:12:37 PM
sorry


thats what i meant, brain failure ! and   I meant the arch at the northern end. thank you for the history chris - fascinating
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on May 14, 2019, 09:58:04 PM
That is looking amazing.

Just shown it to the wife "think it looks familiar" was the response

Yes, I've shown you photos of what it looked like and we usually park the car there (pointing at the loading wharf that's now car park)

"will yours look as good as that?"


 :smiley-laughing:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 15, 2019, 06:36:13 AM
That is looking amazing.

Thanks, mate.

Quote
Just shown it to the wife "think it looks familiar" was the response
Yes, I've shown you photos of what it looked like and we usually park the car there (pointing at the loading wharf that's now car park)


That's brilliant, just the sort of reaction I'm hoping for - it shows I must be getting it right.

Quote
"will yours look as good as that?"

Oh dear, does that mean that one of us could be going to in the doghouse?
;)


 :smiley-laughing:
[/quote]
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on May 15, 2019, 05:05:27 PM

Quote
Just shown it to the wife "think it looks familiar" was the response
Yes, I've shown you photos of what it looked like and we usually park the car there (pointing at the loading wharf that's now car park)


That's brilliant, just the sort of reaction I'm hoping for - it shows I must be getting it right.

Quote
"will yours look as good as that?"

Oh dear, does that mean that one of us could be going to in the doghouse?
;)


 :smiley-laughing:
[/quote]

You've got me wishing I'd built Lakeside, got swayed by streamlined coronations and roundy roundy - would probably have trains running by now if I'd done it though.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 18, 2019, 01:57:18 PM
Here a few pics of the current state of progress on the station building whilst I still have the layout at home on which to plonk it. No trains I'm afraid - the layout's already been taken down, I just pushed these two boards together so I could check the levels at the back of the building before I get too far along and find that I measured wrongly and get the building sitting too high.

Looking from the south;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-180519132712.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77585)

the north;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-180519132759.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77586)

and from above;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-180519132822.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77587)

As can be seen, all roofs are now on and the top of the ventilation tower is complete. I've also added the large ornate porch over the station entrance, the roof lights over the northern (original) half of the train shed and the plain vent over the southern (extended) half.

I still have to make and add the four small louvred towers over the ridge of the train shed, two chimney stacks over the station building, bargeboards, ridge tiles and flashing, all of which I can work on whilst the layout's down at the club rooms. Oh, and the waiting room and canopy over platform 3. At some point there will also be guttering and downpipes needed.

When I bring the layout back home I can work on the ground level behind the building to bring it up to the level of the station entrance and exit porches and also raise it a little behind the goods shed. I hadn't realised that the trackwork wasn't all level in the original, it appears that the slate wharf siding was actually slightly elevated but it's too late now so I'll have to work around the problem.

There's not a lot I could do about the gap above the platform at the northern end because the entire building has to be removable and there is, unfortunately, a little distortion in the baseboards. The worst bit is the floor I had to put in inside the exit porch (but which is over the platforms I'd already completed) because I needed something to support the single post at the end of the arch. Shouldn't be too much of a problem though, that end of the platform was laid out as a garden so half the problem can be concealed by a shed which appears in a few photos I have and the rest by a flower bed ;)

Likewise I'm sure I can plonk some suitable platform paraphernalia against the end of the building on platforms 2 & 3.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 18, 2019, 02:10:28 PM
Stunning. You must be pleased. . . Thank you for sharing your hard work on the layout. The local history society would take an interest in those buildings!


I certainly had to look twice at the hard work on your buildings and the ballasting around the track, i am once lost forwords !!!!!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: daffy on May 18, 2019, 05:13:49 PM
Just back from an excellent holiday in Coniston, and pleased to relate that I had a most excellent guided tour of the old station area last Sunday by Chris himself.

Seeing the recent progress made on the model is really impressive, and I can testify that although I canít see N scale versions of Chris and I walking about the area in his recent photos  ;) , all is a wonderful re-creation of what was sadly demolished and replaced by anonymous identi-industrial units.

Walking the paths and tarmac beneath the retaining walls that tame the hillside with Chris, I got a real sense of the labour and ingenuity that had gone into building the original site, and though the Station building itself has gone, the soul of the place remains. With Chrisís enthusiasm and detailed knowledge echoed in every square inch of his model, I look forward to one day seeing it in operation.

Thanks. :thumbsup:

ps - Chris, I was wrong about the Borrowdale Volcanics. :doh: Fading memory I suppose.  :(  The southern edge of Coniston Old Man is a geologic boundary for the Coniston slate, but with limestones, not volcanics. It is that junction that is seen clearly at Timley Knott, as I was reminded when I walked beside it on Thursday. Apologies.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 19, 2019, 04:45:55 PM
Thanks, guys - although I think that I ought to point pout that the "detailed knowledge" with which you credit me is limited to only that which I've needed to try and recreate the station in miniature ;-)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 19, 2019, 04:56:26 PM
I may have missed a thread. Please, how did you achieve the local stone effect on your buildings? The louvres and the roof are eye catching? Its ok just catching up with threads as haue not got a lot of things going on today
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 19, 2019, 05:30:00 PM
I may have missed a thread. Please, how did you achieve the local stone effect on your buildings? The louvres and the roof are eye catching?

Thanks. The stone walls were made from the various photos I took of the real walls remaining at the site, resized so they would print out to scale and tiled to expand the photos so that they'd cover a larger area.
The louvres and slate roofing were done in a similar way, albeit not with photos from the original Coniston coz there aren't any still there unfortunately.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 22, 2019, 12:40:13 PM
Taking Coniston down to the clubroom tonight, ready for our open day on June 1st and that's the first nagging doubt out of the way. Phew - it does fit in the car, just  :thumbsup:
That's all three baseboards, the 8' folding table on which it sits and the scaffolding adjustable feet that I use for level adjustment - although I did have to unscrew those from the boards on which I fitted them to spread the load better over a carpeted floor. Yes, I have packed the screws and a screwdriver so I can put them back on.

Just a box containing the cables, control panel and "testing" stock still to go in, that'll fit in the front passenger footwell.

Next nagging doubt to come - can we get it up the stairs and round the corner into the first room? We should be able to since I got it down my stairs which have a complete u-turn in them, however the proof will only come from trying it tonight.


Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 22, 2019, 12:52:13 PM
Hope coniston is we ll received with positive comments. Chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 22, 2019, 01:32:53 PM
Hope coniston is we ll received with positive comments. Chris

Thanks mate.

For starters, however, I'll be happy if it gets there in the same number of pieces as when it set out, gets up the stairs and all goes back together and works properly  :)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 22, 2019, 01:52:38 PM
Thatts a challenge and always one of my planning ciriteria
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: daffy on May 22, 2019, 01:53:02 PM
Best wishes for a successful Open Day with Coniston, Chris. :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on May 22, 2019, 10:02:36 PM

Next nagging doubt to come - can we get it up the stairs and round the corner into the first room? We should be able to since I got it down my stairs which have a complete u-turn in them, however the proof will only come from trying it tonight.

You've not seen in and out of the guest room through which the layout room is for Milliedale on Sea, I actually have no idea if it can be gotten out of the house! :D

The stairs into the loft conversion are in the wrong place so one of the roof joists narrows the top of the stairs.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 22, 2019, 11:09:39 PM
Well, I'm pleased to report that;
a) it came apart as designed OK.
b) it made it down the stairs at home.
c) it did fit in the car.
d) it made it down to the clubroom in almost the same number of pieces (*) as it started out.
e) it fitted going up the stairs to the clubroom.
f) it all went back together OK
g) wonder of wonders, it all worked correctly first time
h) big sigh of relief

(*) one lump of clump foliage fell off  >:(

The reactions of the club members? Much the same as those I've had from you kind people over the past few months, I did just about manage to get my head back out through the door ;-)

And they haven't seen the station building and train shed yet - at least you've had some previews of it ;-)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 23, 2019, 12:47:01 AM
Pleased coniston was received well and travelled well.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on May 23, 2019, 09:03:47 AM
Congratulations, Chris.

The praise you received was certainly well-deserved.

Exhibiting the layout in its 'local' area is a wonderful thing.  Perhaps, in due course, you will get opportunities to show it to a wider and more general audience in the Lancashire North of the Sands area.  It will, I'm sure, be of great interest.  A bit like the model of Bude station that I recall seeing in  Bude museum.  I wonder if it's still there...

All best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 26, 2019, 11:02:51 AM
Followers of Coniston will be pleased to know that in the absence of the layout, which is now down at the clubrooms, I have not taken the opportunity to succumb to a spell of idleness but have, instead, continued with the main station building to the extent that it is now very nearly finished.
Below are a few pics with no trains, platforms nor, even, proper ground to distract the eye;

Looking from the south-east;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-260519101542.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77800)

from the east;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-260519101608.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77801)

from the north-east;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-260519101727.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77802)

from the north-west;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-260519101752.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77803)

from the west;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-260519101817.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77804)

and from the south-west;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-260519101844.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77805)

Since the last update, I have added the platform 3 canopy and waiting room, the four vent towers along the train shed ridge, the chimney stacks and pots over the station building toilets and booking office, ridge tiles and flashing, bargeboards on all gables, guttering and downpipes on the eastern side and the weather vane on the entrance porch roof.

The only (IMO) essential bits still to be added are the goods shed doors but I need to get the layout back first because the ground levels need raising to meet the back of the building correctly - that is why there are some little "platforms" partway up the vehicle entrances to the goods shed, to give me a level to which I need to raise the ground.

I haven't bothered with guttering and downpipes on the western side since they won't be visible anyway, however I have made a note of where they should go in case I ever run out of things to do and decide to add them.

The weather vane I am rather pleased with, despite it being somewhat overscale. It's probably about twice the size it ought to be but I couldn't make it any smaller (particularly the direction marker letters) so have accepted that it's too big on the basis that it is a significant detail so really does need to be present. The vane itself has text reading "CR 1859", on the original this was pierced but for my model I've used the photo of the original and done it as white lettering on a black background, printed out and stuck onto the pole. The direction markers are bits of bent wire soldered together.

I very much doubt that the finials on the ridge and main vent towers were white - but I've done them that colour to reduce the risk of an errant arm/hand clouting them.

I have no idea what the tall white pole sticking up from the NE corner was but it's very prominent in any photos of that end so needed to be included.
My first though was a flagpole but I wouldn't have thought that, the least "important" end of the station, to be the logical location for one and I can see no sign of flagpole fittings in any photographs. It also was fixed to the building well above head height. My next thought, as it was so tall, was that it might have been for a radio aerial, but it appears in photos as early as 1905-08 which seems a bit early to me for commercial radio. One thing it can't have been, or is unlikely to have been, was a telegraph pole - not with one of those located adjacent to the north-western corner of the building and another approximately level with it just the other side of the platform 3 and runround loop tracks. So I've no idea but, as I said it's very prominent so had to be included.

My next thought turned to how to transport the building without breaking it - remember, it cannot be fixed down on the platforms since it spans a board joint. Conveniently, it fits in the largest of an assortment of tool boxes I have so I've made a platform in the base to which it can be fitted, using the same pegs as when it's on the layout platforms. A couple of bits of foam fit between the ridges and the removable tray of the tool box stop the building jumping up off of its locating holes - and the tray, also conveniently, will accommodate all the rolling stock I need to take, sorted ;-)

Next task, something to keep the bobby and his levers, bells and instruments warm and dry - i.e., the signal box.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: RailGooner on May 26, 2019, 11:25:24 AM
Simply stunning. The weather vane is a tour de force. :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

 :wonderfulmodelling:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 26, 2019, 11:30:07 AM
Simply stunning chris. Thank you for sharing
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on May 26, 2019, 11:37:03 AM
Excellent work, Chris.

Congratulations.

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Newportnobby on May 26, 2019, 11:46:35 AM
Super job, Chris :goggleeyes:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 26, 2019, 11:53:38 AM
Thanks guys.

I'm pleased with the way it's turned out, particularly since all I've had to which to refer has been a couple of dozen photographs few of which were taken from ideal angles. It does look pretty close to the photos so I think I've succeeded.

Of course, if I'd had any sense I'd have started with something simpler for my first attempt at 2mm scale buildings, like the signal box or loco shed - for both of which I have drawings as well as photos. However, those (certainly the signal box) were pretty well bog-standard Furness Railway designs and could have been anywhere on the FR, whereas the station, goods shed and train shed structure was unique and really shouts out "Oi, this is Coniston", so I'm glad that I did decide to do it first after all.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 26, 2019, 01:28:26 PM
For your first attempt at 2mm buildings im in awe. To work from twelve photos must be a challenge. Fab. Please let us say you have a following
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 26, 2019, 01:49:15 PM
For your first attempt at 2mm buildings im in awe. To work from twelve photos must be a challenge. Fab. Please let us say you have a following

OK, if you insist ;-)

Must be pleased with first attempt at 2mm scale buildings.

I certainly am, thanks.

OK, I'll be the first to admit that, whilst I think it's probably as accurate a rendition as most people could manage from the limited source info, it's far from perfect from a construction aspect - too many non right-angled right angles, rather more surplus glue splodges or smears than I'd like, etc. but better construction technique will, I hope, come with experience.

I console myself with the fact that, at what would be considered a normal viewing distance such flaws, particularly at this scale, are largely un-noticable.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: tutenkhamunsleeping on May 26, 2019, 02:29:23 PM
Lovely structure, well done :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 26, 2019, 06:43:38 PM
chris

if all you have had to which to refer has been a couple of dozen photographs take my hat off, just simply beautiful. no part do i dislike - i just love following your posts, thank you
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 26, 2019, 07:56:51 PM
if all you have had to which to refer has been a couple of dozen photographs take my hat off, just simply beautiful. no part do i dislike - i just love following your posts, thank you

Cheers mate.

Yes that is pretty well all I had.

I did have the approximate plan dimensions from the track plan in the book about the Coniston railway, but those needed to be tweaked to fit to the alterations that had to be made to the track due to limitations of matching Peco point to the track plan, plus tweaks I'd had to make to avoid putting points over baseboard joins.

The book also included the drawings for a tea room that was built on the north end of platform 1 in 1905 (and removed during WW1). Rather helpfully, the drawings included part of adjacent structures (to show how it would fit in), from which I was able to get the ridge heights for the station building and the northern part of the train shed.

The photo taken from the church tower in Coniston village was an almost square-on view, so I could use that to derive the locations, widths and heights of the gable ends for the train shed lighting windows and also guesstimate the difference in height between the ridges of the northern and southern ends of the train shed, because they weren't the same.

Some photos show the train shed ends with trains under the arches, which allowed me to guesstimate the heights of the arches based upon the height of a train, everything else had to be guesstimated by looking at the proportions of the various dimensions in the photos.

Beyond that, all the other photos were taken at rather oblique angles, i.e. from on platform edges, so all I could do was look closely at them to see what detail I could deduce. For example, only one shows the canopy and waiting room on platform 3 and was taken from beside the footbridge so the waiting room is a long way down and, annoyingly, in shadow. Looking at it with a magnifying glass I "think" that it does show a door and two windows near the door, as I've done it, but I could be wrong.

Overall, the whole structure looks about right so I'm satisfied. If I have got some details wrong, so be it.
Anyone who would remember it as it was will be well into their 70s by now so I can always claim that it's their memory that's wrong  :D
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 26, 2019, 08:02:11 PM
i browse the local library and the local history society if anyone could help.its stunning - lost for words chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: dannyboy on May 26, 2019, 08:47:01 PM
I have to agree with all the superlatives above Chris - amazing modelling.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: port perran on May 26, 2019, 08:50:17 PM
That is lovely modelling.
You must be well chuffed Chris.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: cornish yorkie on May 26, 2019, 08:59:20 PM
 :hellosign: Superb modelling sir, looking well.....superb  :thumbsup:
     regards Derek.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 27, 2019, 11:26:11 AM
Thanks guys.

You must be well chuffed Chris.

I certainly am, it's turned out how I'd hoped. I'm also extremely grateful for all the kind comments about the building, they are much appreciated and very encouraging.

However, just you watch - flushed with success and praise about the most difficult building required for Coniston, what's the betting that I'll make a right hash of the much simpler signal box?
;)

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 27, 2019, 12:26:47 PM
Look forward to seeing the signal box develop
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 27, 2019, 01:15:56 PM
Look forward to seeing the signal box develop

You and me both  ;D

Actually, I am working on it now - starting with the stone base and plinth.
Then I think I'll do the weigh house which, whilst attached, is offset slightly so is not an extension of any of the signal box walls - ideally I'll need that in place before I do the signal box cabin, because the weigh house roof butts up against that.
Once I have the weigh house roof in place, I can look at doing the stone chimney and timber cabin.

Somewhere around that stage I also need to decide how much internal detail I want to include. Since it'll be visible from both ends and from  part of the back (which is the side facing the viewer) it'd be nice to at least have some representation of the lever frame. If I can do that I'll build it on the plinth layer then lower the timber cabin layer over it.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on May 27, 2019, 09:48:52 PM
 :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

 :doh: must get on with some modelling myself
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 28, 2019, 11:52:22 AM
Here's the first stages done of the signal box and weigh house, complete with the mk1 thought for a way to do the lever frame;

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-280519113114.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77849)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-280519113140.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77850)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-280519113201.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77851)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-280519113223.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77852)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/7182-280519113249.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=77853)

In a way I'm glad I did do the main station building first - at least that stayed where it was put unlike this little thing for which I definitely could have done with three hands to hold it and the tools.

Don't be concerned that the floor doesn't appear to be fixed down very well - it's a dummy one while I ascertain how the lever frame looks and it's just stuck on top of the real floor with blutac.

The bit of yellow card in a couple of the shots is to simulate the front of the cabin interior, again to see how the lever frame looks.

This thought for the lever frame is drawn in Photoshop and printed out onto OHP film, then cut out and the bottom edge folded to about the right angle before being glued to the floor. Finally two bits of black card were stuck to the floor either side to simulate the frame chassis itself. The levers are all the correct colours for their positions in the frame and their functions - yellow for a distance signal, red for a home or starter signal, black for points, blue for facing point locks and green for the ground frame lock and callup gong.

The mk2 thought involves painting bits of wire and attempting to glue them all in place at the right spacing, straight and at a consistent angle, good game, good game.

I'm of the view that, considering that the levers will only be seen through diddy little windows (7mm high  by 17mm wide max) this rendition of them will suffice both from the aesthetic and the practical point of view, however I would appreciate any other thoughts.

If I do stick to this method, I might consider showing some levers "pulled" but how well they'd show up I'm not sure, especially considering that they'd be leaning back into the middle of the cabin and, therefore, would be seen from a more acute angle. They'd probably just be more apparent as a gap in the row of "unpulled" levers. Again, any thoughts?


Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 28, 2019, 12:12:32 PM
Looking good. Is it to be a working signal box? I would just aim simple. Inside my signalbox the levers are static, its just planning ground frames etc and what moves or doesnt. I would go with how you think
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Innovationgame on May 28, 2019, 12:17:55 PM
To be honest, I would stick with what you have already done. Personally, I wouldn't bother with pulled levers, but it just depends on how realistic you want it to look (rivets and all?).
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on May 28, 2019, 12:32:01 PM
My metcalfe signal box and my ratio one both have pulled levers in, using the ratio kit, but you can hardly see them as I've not fitted lighting

best thing to do is build the box and place it on the layout as I think you plan on doing, and then decide from there.

Can't quite see in the photos do you wrap the brick paper around in the window openings or just cut them square?
You implied in an earlier post that scratch building buildings was new to you - while you've done a brilliant job so far it may be worth downloading one of the free scalescenes kits to see how he hides edges and other methods that may assist in future buildings.

The weighbridge / coal office is free and might actually suit needs elsewhere on the layout https://scalescenes.com/product/r024-weighbridge-or-coal-office/
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 28, 2019, 01:15:04 PM
Thanks guys. I've no intention of making anything move inside the box, just to make it not look empty.
For the same reason, the tablet exchange instrument will just be a brown block in the corner.

I'm after the overall impression for the whole layout, rather than super-fine detail that probably won't be seen anyway from a normal viewing distance.

Can't quite see in the photos do you wrap the brick paper around in the window openings or just cut them square?

I don't use brick paper at all. I design the complete walls in Photoshop, print them out onto 160gsm card and back that with thicker card as a stiffener. For windows/doors where I think it matters I do print out two or three copies and layer them, cutting the complete apertures out of the top sheet and the insides of the frames out of the middle sheet.
As can be seen, I don't always bother with glazing, unless there's something to be seen through it. On the train shed I did glaze all the lighting windows because trains can be seen through them but I haven't on the lower part of the signal box because I don't intend to put stuff in the weigh house (which by the late 1930s was probably only used for storage, the weighbridge having long been removed) and I'm certainly not going to try and do the locking room mechanism.

As far as I can tell from the few photos available, the door/window reveals appear to have been painted so I'm happy to just cut them out and leave the exposed white edges of the printed card.
Where I don't want exposed edges, I touch them up with either a pencil or a dab of grey paint.

Quote
You implied in an earlier post that scratch building buildings was new to you - while you've done a brilliant job so far it may be worth downloading one of the free scalescenes kits to see how he hides edges and other methods that may assist in future buildings.
The weighbridge / coal office is free and might actually suit needs elsewhere on the layout https://scalescenes.com/product/r024-weighbridge-or-coal-office/

Cheers, I'll do that - an extra incentive being that that coal office looks more like the one that used to be at Coniston than the Ratio one does.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: themadhippy on May 28, 2019, 01:21:20 PM
If you want  some pulled levers how about a  combination of both mk1 and mk2 . Print another set of levers with gaps for the pulled levers and bits of wire to fill the gaps in the pulled position
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 28, 2019, 01:26:53 PM
OR i use a dummy frame with pins painted black, white, yellow
as static ,maybe a sketch of the railway plan, a signalman posed
certainly superb idea
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 28, 2019, 01:34:41 PM
OR i use a dummy frame with pins painted black, white, yellow
as static ,maybe a sketch of the railway plan, a signalman posed
certainly superb idea

I'll certainly be including the signalling plan, stuck on the wall in front of the lever frame - there was an unglazed panel in the front of the box for that purpose.
I've got the one that was in the book I have, which I've already scanned and will reduce significantly to get it the right size.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 28, 2019, 02:40:13 PM
Either plan would work . I would personally use plan a. The one you wrote before mention of mark two plan chris.  superb research and loving it
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Innovationgame on May 29, 2019, 07:36:28 AM
Of course, you could always use a double version of your Mk1 solution.  That is to say, print out the unpulled levers on one piece transparancy and print the pulled levers on another, leaving gaps in the first for the pulled lever.  If you locate the two sets of levers at the correct angles, you would have a good representation of all the levers in the correct place, no matter from what angle they were viewed.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 29, 2019, 10:10:11 AM
After giving it more thought, I've decided to leave all the levers unpulled because I really don't think that any pulled levers would show up anyway.

The signal box is near the front of the layout and faces across the station throat, away from the viewer, so the only windows through which things can be seen are the end ones and a single one at one end of the back wall, 1/5 of the length of it. Since pulled levers would be pointing back towards the viewer I don't think they'd really be apparent enough to justify doing it.

Also, if I were to depict some pulled, they'd only be correct for one particular train movement so most of the time they'd be incorrect since there are ten different pathways through the station from one end to the other plus two access to the loco shed and yard and another to the goods yard, all of which I intend to use. If I felt capable of making them move in response to point and signal movements then it would be worth it as a challenge if nothing else but I think that's really a detail too far at this stage of my n-gauge modelling.

Thanks for all your thoughts, though.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 29, 2019, 10:45:51 AM
By the way, I took the main station building down to the clubhouse last night and reunited it with the platforms.

The general tone of the reaction was along the lines of "Hey, we're going to need such and such buildings for this and that layout, guess who's got the contract?"   :claphappy:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 29, 2019, 12:09:41 PM
You were commissioned?
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 29, 2019, 12:50:19 PM
You were commissioned?

Or lumbered  :laugh3:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: daffy on May 29, 2019, 12:53:21 PM
You were commissioned?

Or lumbered  :laugh3:

Yep! Sounds exactly like an NCOís lot. :D


Most impressive buildings Chris. :thumbsup: Looking forward to seeing the Station in its rightful place on your layout.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on May 29, 2019, 12:59:20 PM
You were commissioned?
Or lumbered  :laugh3:
Yep! Sounds exactly like an NCOís lot. :D

I don't mind though. Club layouts are supposed to be collaborative efforts and if that's where I can best help then I will.

The only drawback is that the one for which they will want most buildings is the Orribly Oversize one  :hmmm:

Quote
Most impressive buildings Chris. :thumbsup: Looking forward to seeing the Station in its rightful place on your layout.

Once I get the layout back home I'll take more pics - the lighting in the room at the club is even worse than that in my spare room.
 
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 29, 2019, 04:08:14 PM
everybody has a skill and a function. looks as though your skills could play a part. your buildings and scenics have certainly inspired me.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 01, 2019, 05:53:18 AM
Off to get all the Club's stuff moved and set up for the open day shortly - but I also have a couple more surprises for them.

I took the signal box down the other evening and put it in place, and now I also have the ground frame cabin for the north end of the station and the half-finished loco shed.

The loco shed is only half-finished because it has a lean-to mess room which shares its end wall with the top of the overall site retaining wall so I need to have both the layout and the loco shed at home so I can check (and double-check) the measurements. For now the eastern side of the roof is temporarily fixed with sellotape because the mess room roof is an extension down from the loco shed roof so the overall roof that side will need remaking to suit.

I'll post pics of the latest additions when I've got it all back home and set up again.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 01, 2019, 06:02:44 AM
Good luck with the open day. Hope that the latest additions are well received. Hope you do nt get lumbered with anything.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 01, 2019, 06:23:07 AM
Good luck with the open day. Hope that the latest additions are well received.

Cheers mate.

Quote
Hope you do nt get lumbered with anything.

I probably will be - but that's the point of club layouts isn't it, a collaborative effort  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 01, 2019, 06:37:38 AM
Very true that point. With the people i model with i never go near electrics and tend to make the scenics buildings and advise on typical stock workings
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 01, 2019, 06:46:29 AM
Very true that point. With the people i model with i never go near electrics and tend to make the scenics buildings and advise on typical stock workings

I'm happy to work on anything within my abilities or that I can learn - provided it will use steam motive power  :D
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 01, 2019, 07:05:33 AM
have fun today !
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 01, 2019, 09:45:17 PM
have fun today !

Twas a good day in the end.

Apart from Coniston, we had our N-gauge Millom in the early '60s layout, two small N-gauge demo layouts that had been built to show what can be done in a small space, a 16' OO gauge end to end in the very early stages of construction, an 11'x8' roundy roundy that some of the guys are building with a view to having it for kids to play on using either our stock or anything they've brought with them and a small OO gauge "puzzle" layout with two sidings and numbered wagons that users have to shunt into a given order, which the kids enjoyed.
 
In addition, since we are Millom Scale and Railway Modellers (i.e not just railways),  we had a couple of models that one of our member's grandfather had built, a top-notch working water powered model of the Laxey Wheel on the Isle of Man and a rather impressive 10'x3' street scene with overhead cable powered trams running on two loops of O-gauge track, and one of our current member's radio controlled models, some form of military vehicle and a rather nice Clyde Puffer, unfortunately not the Vital Spark.

I didn't hear much in the way of comments about the other layouts, simply because I wasn't with those most of the time, but got lots of nice comments and interest about Coniston, some from people who'd never known that there had been a station there and even one or two who vaguely remembered it.

We estimated that we had in the region of 80 visitors throughout the day which, from only 20 A4 posters in various shops in the area and a couple of posts on the local facebook page by way of publicity, is very encouraging.
Whether we do get any new members remains to be seen, several did indicate interest, but it does give us some idea of the local interest should we decide to try putting on a proper exhibition in the next year or two.


Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 01, 2019, 10:07:00 PM
glad it went wel  l   chris


did that millom layout incorporate the Millom and Askham Haematite and Iron Co Ltd.? railway

interesting as i have seen info on this

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 02, 2019, 06:20:51 AM
glad it went wel  l   chris

 :thumbsup:


Quote
did that millom layout incorporate the Millom and Askham Haematite and Iron Co Ltd.? railway
interesting as i have seen info on this

It includes the yard at Millom where the haematite ore and pig iron trains were assembled prior to departure and where coal and coke deliveries were sorted upon arrival from West Cumbria and further afield but only includes the beginning of the spurs themselves down to Millom Ironworks and the Hodbarrow Mine.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 02, 2019, 06:32:56 AM
THAnks chris,glad it went well. this confirmed my knowledge of millom as i go a lot to a preserved railway centre which has rescued a loco and have seen some interesting articles  on the area. glad your open day went well.  chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 04, 2019, 03:13:12 PM
As regular visitors will be aware, Coniston has been residing down at the clubhouse for a couple of weeks, hopefully to come back home later this week. In the meantime, however, I haven't been idle but have been working on all the remaining buildings that are needed;

First we have the signal box;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-040619143509.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78125)
This side will only be seen by an operator at the back of the layout, whilst the following two are what a viewer would see.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-040619143533.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78126)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-040619143553.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78127)
No steps at present, Bobby has to be a good climber. I'll add those once it is back on the layout so I can ensure that the steps meet the ground properly and don't either float in mid-air or jack the end of the signal box up ;-)

Now we have the ground frame cabin. This little hut housed a 15-lever ground frame for operating the points and signals at the northern end of the station. Why they separated those from the main signal box I know not. The ground frame had to work in conjunction with, and be unlocked by, the main signal box but I can't see that the distances for pulling points or signals would have been excessive from the main frame.
Anyway, this, again, is what an operator will see;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-040619143617.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78128)
whilst this is the side seen by a viewer;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-040619143709.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78129)

Next is the coal office and weighbridge. This is the Scalescenes freebie, the closest option that I could see for use at Coniston. Having made it, I'll use it for now but will probably make another using slate walling which will be more in keeping with the rest.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-040619143731.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78130)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-040619143812.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78131)

This little hut is to go on the north end of platform 1. What its original use was I don't know but I suspect that the station staff used it for the gardening tools when that end of the platform was turned into a garden. It may have originally been an office for when the coal yard was here or, maybe a lamp hut although it's about as far away from the signal box as it could be.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-040619143832.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78132)

This is the slate office, the only building remaining at big Coniston, so is (like the bridge at the far end) assembled directly from scaled down photographs.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-040619143859.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78133)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-040619143923.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78134)
It is too tall at present (as can be deduced by looking at the door) because it needs to be let into the scenery - the terrain slopes up at about 30 degrees in both directions from the leftmost corner - which I can't do until I have the layout back home.

Finally, we have the loco shed, not yet complete because, again, I need the layout back home. It still requires the mess room adding to the eastern side and that side of the roof making to extend down over it. However, the mess room end wall is integral with the site retaining wall so I need to get the required measurements once I have the rest of the shed correctly centred over the track before I can do that. I also need to add the smoke vents over the track which , again, I will do once I have it correctly located.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-040619143952.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78135)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-040619144018.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78136)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-040619144046.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78137)


I had thought that I must have been mad to attempt the station building, the largest and most important of the lot, first but in retrospect I'm glad that I did. These smaller ones were so fiddly to do (and have flaws galore) that I might well have been put off doing the big one. That little hut for platform 1 is only 1/2" by 3/8" in plan. Luckily, the flaws only really show up when viewed close up, when they are on the layout they won't be nearly so apparent.

I may well redo the signal box and ground frame cabin at some point because I'm not overly happy with them. They were so fiddly to do that I haven't even got glazing in the windows due to there being insufficient material to which to affix it. Also, I really wanted to do the signal box with outside diagonal framing in the contrasting brown/cream colours instead of the later external weatherboarding but I just couldn't get the gaps between the framing cut neatly. If I do have another go I'll work from the inside out, making boxes of the glazing material and adding the exteriors almost plank by plank in layers on the outside.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 04, 2019, 04:35:05 PM
chris



thank you for sharing the hard work on those three structures, looking beautiful and will sit really well on coniston.l ook forward
to seeing them planted or positioned . cheers   chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 04, 2019, 04:55:41 PM
thank you for sharing the hard work on those three structures, looking beautiful and will sit really well on coniston.l ook forward to seeing them planted or positioned .

Thanks mate.

The plan is to get the layout taken apart tomorrow evening. Provided it's not persisting it down (coz it ain't waterproof) then I should be able to get it loaded up and taken home, otherwise the return home will have to wait until it isn't raining and a keyholder is available to let me  collect it.

Once it's back home I'll get it set up again as quickly as I can, then I can plant the buildings (and finish the loco shed and, hopefully, signal box) befoe planting a few other bits (telegraph poles, loading gauge, etc.), then I can run off some more pics.

I have work to do on the ground levels behind the station building but that'll take a bit of time so I'll leave that until afterwards as it only shows that there's a problem from some angles.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 04, 2019, 05:14:20 PM
Thanks chris. Going to be a challenge if the weather is not good. I have never seen any layout with a weatherproof cover. . Again chris beautiful piece of modelling. Maybe coniston should be shown off to the local history society or church fete. Just read how well your club show went
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 08, 2019, 11:32:13 AM
I'm pleased to report that it wasn't persisting down on Wednesday evening, so Coniston returned home - still in the correct number of pieces, phew.
I spent part of Thursday lugging the table and the three boards upstairs again before reassembling the layout and having a good play testing it to make sure everything still worked. Having determined that all was well, I completed the loco shed/mess room, cobbled up the steps to save Bobby having shin up a rope to get into his signal box and dug out a larger hole so I could plant the slate office, which turned out to be rather larger than it appeared on the plan to which I've been working.

Those little tasks accomplished, I planted the rest of the buildings and set up the backscene and lighting so I can now offer for (hopefully) your delectation, Coniston in all its glory, if I may be excused using such a strong a term, complete with all the buildings in place;

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110005.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78262)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110028.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78263)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110140.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78264)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110200.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78265)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110224.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78266)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110249.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78267)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110315.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78268)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110338.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78269)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110405.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78270)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110430.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78271)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110453.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78272)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110515.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78273)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110541.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78274)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110601.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78275)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110623.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78276)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110645.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78277)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110705.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78278)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110734.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78279)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-080619110801.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78280)

I'm still very happy with the main station building & train shed and I'm also happy with the loco shed and the slate office - the latter being the building on the bank behind the station, which should be recognisable to anyone who's ever been to the real Coniston since it's the only original building remaining on the site. The model is made up from a set of photographs of the real thing, resized to scale, printed and assembled.

I'm less happy with the signal box, especially having seen RogerDB's latest upload which makes my effort look dreadfully amateurish - I console myself with the knowledge that he's been at this game longer than me so, hopefully, I will get better with more practice.

As I expected, the coal yard office does look very incongruous. That was the Scalescenes "freebie" but they didn't offer one in slate. I tried it but, having seen it on Coniston, will definitely have to do one myself in local slate at some point.

The next big job is to raise the ground level behind the station building and goods shed to save passengers having to be very good at jumping and to avoid the need for goods to self levitate into or out of the goods shed. Once that is done I won't need to lean across the boards so much and can, therefore look at planting trees (on the bank in front of the backdrop, between the tracks and the station access road and on the bank in front of the station), telegraph poles, the loading gauge, etc.

Other tasks required are to build up the ballast/ground around the signal box and loco shed so that they are not "floating", add the loco coaling stage to the end of the loco shed and make the garden on the north end of platform 1. Then it's just requiring little details - people, assorted "stuff" scattered around, etc., etc.

I also need to finish the points indicators relay circuits, see if I can get the signals working and remake the control panel, get the uncouplers working, sort a means of being able to see trains and tracks over the backscene if I'm operating from the rear of the layout, etc.

Still plenty to keep me out of mischief, eh?



Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 08, 2019, 11:42:34 AM
Thanks chris. Superb photos. Glad you got got the layout home in one piece. Will review photos later and comment when have time
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: daffy on June 08, 2019, 11:51:06 AM
No, Ďgloryí is not too strong a word. A wonderful layout and seeing the Station complex resurrected on what is now a car park and small industrial area is a joy to behold. Well done, well done! :thumbsup:

From a first look through your great photos, I note one other detail you might want to look at: there does not appear to be any footpath access to the Slate Office. But Iím being overly picky.


The layout deserves exhibiting in Coniston itself. Iím sure the local Tourist Board would be most interested.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 08, 2019, 11:52:02 AM
Those are lovely photos. Must be pleased
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: RailGooner on June 08, 2019, 11:54:02 AM
..
 Coniston in all its glory
...

Glorious indeed Chris. :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

 :wonderfulmodelling: :greatpicturessign:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 08, 2019, 11:59:24 AM
Thanks guys.

From a first look through your great photos, I note one other detail you might want to look at: there does not appear to be any footpath access to the Slate Office. But Iím being overly picky.

No, you're not being overly picky. It's one of the things that falls into the "other little details" category and is on the list to be done.

Can't do it yet, though, because the PVA under the last application of flock around the building since I dug the larger hole is still tacky - or ought to be since I only put it on a couple of hours ago  :D
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Portpatrick on June 08, 2019, 12:01:27 PM
my goodness.  Looking at the photos what an amazing piece of work. So convincing and doing full justice to the real thing a shown in the photos in that small book we both own.  And in such a short timescale as well you lucky whatsit.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 08, 2019, 12:28:53 PM
my goodness.  Looking at the photos what an amazing piece of work. So convincing and doing full justice to the real thing

Thanks, mate.

Quote
a shown in the photos in that small book we both own.

You mean my principle source of information? Well, that and the other book about the Coniston Railway.
I have the A5 sized Oakwood Press publication and the A4 sized Cumbrian Railways Association one. Beyond that, all I've had for reference is photos I found on Google, a few that someone took of the part derelict site and put on a CD we found at the club and visits I've made to the remains of the site.

Quote
And in such a short timescale as well you lucky whatsit.

I'm still staggered myself at how quickly it's gone - 7 months and one week since I ordered the first materials. I know that I'm retired but it's not the only thing I've been doing in that time. I think that when I've started on an aspect of the model I've just got on a roll and kept going.

Things will slow down now, or appear to, because most of what's left to do is either non-visual stuff (like the signals, control panel, uncluopling and associated electrickery stuff) or little details that will just get added but not individually make much difference to the overall scene.

In the meantime, I need to work out how I can integrate Torver, Woodland, Broughton-in-Furness.....  :-X
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Jimmy77 on June 08, 2019, 12:43:46 PM
That looks fantastic! Great modelling!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: port perran on June 08, 2019, 12:48:47 PM
This is a fabulous layout.
You should be immensely pleased with it and proud of it.
The scenic work is fantastic. Really well done.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on June 08, 2019, 01:29:36 PM
This is a fabulous layout.
You should be immensely pleased with it and proud of it.
The scenic work is fantastic. Really well done.

Seconded.

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 08, 2019, 01:38:10 PM
chris

you should take these as compliments. to work on the loco shed / messroom,   the slate office in ust a short space of time staggering. those photos are a testament to what can be achieved in such short space and such a short space of time.

hope that the work to do on the ground levels behind the station building are going nicely and your commentary is very informative
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 08, 2019, 02:18:53 PM
you should take these as compliments.

Oh, I do - and much appreciated they are too.

Quote
to work on the loco shed / messroom,   the slate office in ust a short space of time staggering. those photos are a testament to what can be achieved in such short space and such a short space of time.

Like I said earlier, I think that when I find a technique that works for me I just get on a roll and keep going.
Of course, I am aided in the construction speed by my preference for using a superglue that I've found sticks my choice of materials well and quickly, which means that there isn't much waiting time before I can do the next bit.

Quote
hope that the work to do on the ground levels behind the station building are going nicely and your commentary is very informative

Seems to be - at present I'm building up the edges immediately adjacent to the building with layers of thick card.so I have a clear marker as to where not to fill afterwards. Once that is done I can put the building safely out of the way and work back towards the slate wharf track, gently sloping with a shallow cutting immediately adjacent to the track. That's the plan, at least.

It doesn't need to be 100% perfect because, except at the very ends of the building, it won't be seen by people looking from the  viewing side - however it needs to be done because if it isn't I'll know that it isn't and it'll bug me forever ;-)


Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 08, 2019, 02:50:57 PM
chris

the greenery and the scenics compliment the beautiful work
around the slate area. the station. feels like we are all transported back in time to the area and standing at coniston

sure take your time with the backscene and lighting !!!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: dannyboy on June 08, 2019, 06:07:17 PM
There are plenty of superlatives already used, so I will just say - I agree with them all!  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Innovationgame on June 08, 2019, 06:27:07 PM
Beautiful pictures, although they took an age to download.  They must be very large files.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 08, 2019, 07:12:37 PM
Beautiful pictures, although they took an age to download.  They must be very large files.

Thanks. They shouldn't have been overly large, I cut them down to 1024 pixels wide - although Explorer tells me they totalled 17Mb in size. Maybe I forgot to set the quality setting lower than "best", force of habit  :doh:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Chris in Prague on June 08, 2019, 07:57:44 PM
A truly superb model. Highly realistic with great attention to detail.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: cornish yorkie on June 08, 2019, 11:03:16 PM
A truly superb model. Highly realistic with great attention to detail.
:hellosign:   :greatpicturessign:
    I`ll second that & agree with all the above    :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 11, 2019, 01:13:11 PM
We've been having great weather recently in South Lakeland, some rain but not too little nor too much combined with quite a few warm sunny days. when this happens at this time of year all the plants put on a sudden growth spurt as if they know that the growing season is usually fairly short here and want to put on as much growth as they can.

Rarely, however, have I seen such a tremendous spurt of growth as has happened at Coniston in the last few days, transforming the landscape considerably. The whole of the northern end of the site, both front and back, is now heavily wooded, as they should be.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-110619124055.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78359)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-110619124120.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78360)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-110619124148.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78361)
Here we can see that Bank Road and Walna Scar Road continue on from the end of Station Road, just after the bridge, but not that they come to a dead end at the backscene.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-110619124215.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78362)
Likewise, it is far less obvious now that the spur up to the copper house disappears through the backscene.
The dark green trees needed to be tall to successfully conceal the join with the backscene, but are too tall to fit in the transport casings or, indeed, the car, so I've put them in sockets let into the scenery so that they can be removed for transportation and replanted upon arrival.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-110619124236.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78363)
This shot was taken to approximately replicate the old photo taken from the church tower in the village that I used to get the proportions of the rooflines.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-110619124259.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78364)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-110619124351.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78365)
It certainly has been an unusual growth spurt - some of them have even sprouted crossbars and insulators, whilst the footbridge has sprouted a couple of gas lamps  ;)

The ground levels behind the station and goods shed have been raised OK, so the goods shed has acquired some doors now.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-110619124419.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78366)
One growth, between the loco shed and signal box above, has even sprouted a loading gauge.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-110619124443.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78367)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-110619124508.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78368)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-110619124538.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78369)

Regular visitors to Coniston may have observed a newcomer to the motive power fleet. The fact is that 2691, the Fairburn tank, has been getting a bit bolshie recently, something to do with only trundling up and down with the local passenger trains every day , never getting any time off to have his brasswork polished, etc. In fact he's been extremely sulky, most unlike his normal cheerful self. The other day he actually let off steam in the platform and scared a group of small children who were admiring him. Young Jimmy, the stationmaster's lad thinks he even heard the word "strike" mentioned.

Well, the Slightly-Portly Controller got to hear of this and, not wishing to see the renowned harmonious atmosphere at Coniston destroyed, has authorised the transfer of Ivatt 2-6-0 "mickey mouse" 6404 from Barrow to the Coniston duty roster so 2691 and 6404 will in future be sharing the local passenger duties, enabling both to have adequate time off to be kept in pristine condition.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Chris in Prague on June 11, 2019, 01:27:27 PM
Superb photos. and scenic work with a nice little story, too! Many thanks.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 11, 2019, 01:42:06 PM
Superb photos. and scenic work with a nice little story, too! Many thanks.

Thought that was better than just "I've been buying more trains"  :laugh3:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Newportnobby on June 11, 2019, 01:43:38 PM
The extras have proven so worthwhile. Superb!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 11, 2019, 01:58:23 PM
Thank you. Superb modelling.those trees are an attractive splash of colour.are they ready to plant as so to speak ?
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: dannyboy on June 11, 2019, 03:12:30 PM
Some excellent modelling there. I particularly like how the roads 'disappear' into the trees in picture 3.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: port perran on June 11, 2019, 03:33:03 PM
Excellent photographs.
Excellent modelling.
Excellent little story.
Excellent.  :D
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 11, 2019, 03:39:28 PM
or in another two photos, the railway line gently curves away
in between the trees- absolutely feels like we are rolling back the years and standing in coniston. atmospheric, realistic !!!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 11, 2019, 04:27:15 PM
Thanks for your kind comments everyone.

Thank you. Superb modelling.those trees are an attractive splash of colour.are they ready to plant as so to speak ?

They were indeed, all off the shelf - or, to be more specific, off the Bay of E and the shop of the big South American River.

They are various packs of the ones on those sites that were of a suitable size and that I felt looked least naff looking at the photos provided. Some of them do look a bit naff when seen on their own or as a group of 20+ identical ones, but those have gone together very well for mixed woodland whilst I reserved some of the better looking ones for individual trees in the fields.

I'm happy with the way they've turned out - had I tried to make my own in the quantity required I'd still be at it this time next year I suspect.

Some excellent modelling there. I particularly like how the roads 'disappear' into the trees in picture 3.  :thumbsup:
or in another two photos, the railway line gently curves away in between the trees

Thanks, that was the goal all along. I wanted to disguise the join between scenery and backdrop so, if possible, it wouldn't show.

All along the southern 2/3 of the site there is a stone wall along the top of the cliffs so that end was sorted, just put the wall in and have the backdrop immediately behind that. At the extreme southern end the line to Torver runs under a bridge so all I needed to do was add the backdrop behind the bridge and  some scenery behind for as far as it could be seen under the bridge.

For the rest I could hide the join adequately behind bushes but not where the roads and railway run directly towards the backdrop, hence a judicious selection and placing of trees. I think it's done the trick rather nicely - and is true to life since those roads (and where the railway was) do indeed run under trees.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Innovationgame on June 11, 2019, 04:33:03 PM
Are those pictures of the model or the real thing?
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 11, 2019, 04:41:10 PM
Are those pictures of the model or the real thing?

You are too kind  ;)

How about a mono version of the first one;

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-110619164043.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78370)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 11, 2019, 04:44:11 PM
Certainly hides joins. And i wondered where the line to torver went chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on June 11, 2019, 05:00:02 PM
Excellent photographs.
Excellent modelling.
Excellent little story.
Excellent.  :D

Seconded!

And interesting that a similar thing is happening a few miles to the east, on another ex-Furness Railway branch line, where '2MT' 2-6-0 No. 46441 has joined 'Fairburns' Nos. 42073 and 42085.

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 11, 2019, 05:21:49 PM
And interesting that a similar thing is happening a few miles to the east, on another ex-Furness Railway branch line, where '2MT' 2-6-0 No. 46441 has joined 'Fairburns' Nos. 42073 and 42085.

I knew there was method in my madness  ;)

Actually, I am after increasing the stable a bit more - when/if I can find a mickey mouse tank in LMS livery, those definitely did run on the Coniston branch although maybe not in LMS days.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 11, 2019, 05:55:36 PM
did a certain widnes based retailer stock them ?

here is shot for chrism :

https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5203475 (https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5203475)]https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5203475



http://shedbashuk.blogspot.com/2018/09/lancashire-sub-sheds.html (http://shedbashuk.blogspot.com/2018/09/lancashire-sub-sheds.html) confirms a thought i had
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 11, 2019, 07:36:17 PM
did a certain widnes based retailer stock them ?

None listed. I'm not sure if it's in the current Dapol line, I'll have to check.

Quote
here is shot for chrism :
https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5203475 (https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5203475)]https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5203475

Hehe, that was one of my reference pics for when I was making that end of the station building  ;)

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on June 11, 2019, 08:54:31 PM
Are those pictures of the model or the real thing?

Yup, I echo this comment, it looks as the real location does in photographs, you've captured all the charm and uniqueness of the real location and put it into a model, and done so well.

If you're looking to exhibit it I would love to recommend it to the exhibition manager at one of the clubs I frequent.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 12, 2019, 08:19:28 AM
Are those pictures of the model or the real thing?

Yup, I echo this comment, it looks as the real location does in photographs, you've captured all the charm and uniqueness of the real location and put it into a model, and done so well.

Thanks mate. That was the goal when I set out to build it and I think I've got it pretty close, taking practical considerations into account. It's really great that other people are able to compare it favourably  to old photos of  the original.
Some time I'll try to recreate some of those photos (trains in the same place, etc.) so that we can do a real comparison.

Quote
If you're looking to exhibit it I would love to recommend it to the exhibition manager at one of the clubs I frequent.

Thanks, but I'm a long way off being ready for that yet. Whilst "front of house" is close to being finished, well as "finished" as a layout ever really is, I have quite a bit to do in terms of operation and reliability.
Apart from all the little details that will be needed to bring it to life (people, and "stuff" on the platforms, loads in the goods yard, junk lying around, etc.) the current list of scenery tasks includes;
Making the garden at the north end of platform 1 - partly because it's needed and partly to hide the gap under the station building at that end.
Finishing the ash pit, which is still just a chain drilled slot under the track.
Adding fencing to the turntable deck.
Designing and making a replacement Coal Office - the Scalescenes one will do for now but really isn't in keeping with the rest.
The slate wharf needs a crane, which appear to be of a sheer legs type, and the goods yard crane really needs making - the one I have is a kit but is nothing like the real one was. There are kits more like the real one but unfortunately those are all Orribly Overscale  ;)

On top of those I have the operational ones to do;
Getting the points working more reliably, in particular those which are fired in pairs some of which aren't always reliable - I'm experimenting at present with an extra capacitor on the CDU which looks promising.
I need to sort out remote uncoupling. I have electromagnets installed and wired in but haven't adapted any of the stock yet.
I'd really like to get the signals working instead of being static - I have a couple of ideas but have yet to start experimenting. If I succeed I'll need to add connectors for their wiring to the control panel - I don't have enough spare pins on the current ones.
I need to finish the circuit board for the relays that will drive point indicator LEDs on the control panel.
Once that lot's done I'll need to remake the mimic board control panel.

Then I'll need to sort out the means of actually operating the layout from the back. I have duplicate connectors in place for the control panel but visibility will be a problem - seeing over the backdrop for a start and, even without that, the coal yard siding at least will still be invisible because it's tucked under the cliffs. My thought is to have a signboard above the layout, possibly with lights, and fit a lightweight mirror (or mirrors) to that, angled so that an operator behind the layout can see down onto the tracks.

If I do consider exhibiting it, I'll probably kick off with my own club's exhibition - if we do one next year as is being mooted.

Oh, and I'm also toying with doing Torver (and, possibly, Woodland and Broughton-in-Furness too) so I need to work out how to tack them onto the end of Coniston so they can be run as a complete set or just individually  :hmmm:  I'd never envisaged getting so far, nor so quickly, with Coniston so I never considered doing the set when I started, which would, of course, have  been the best time to plan interconnections.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 12, 2019, 08:27:45 AM
Maybe individual modular board for torver and each section of the line. Good luck sourcing the 2mt chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 12, 2019, 08:36:02 AM
Maybe individual modular board for torver and each section of the line. Good luck sourcing the 2mt chris

Yeah, my current thought is to do the others without fiddle yards (making them smaller) but to have each able to connect to a "common" fiddle yard board. That would allow me to operate each individually by setting them up connected to the yard, or to do a set with the yard board only connected to the end one.
e.g. Torver with fiddle yard -> Coniston, or
Woodland with fiddle yard -> Torver without yard -> Coniston, or
Broughton-in-Furness with fiddle yard -> Woodland without yard -> Torver without yard -> Coniston.

Plenty to think about - but not too soon, there's still lots to do on Coniston first  :no:

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 13, 2019, 07:49:36 AM
Spurred on by the rapid growth spurt seen outside the station, the porters got cracking yesterday and turned the plain gravelled area at the north end if platform 1 into a little garden;

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-130619074315.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78454)

The "foliage" on most of the beds is small bits of clump foliage with dabs of various colour paints to represent the flowers whilst the "Coniston" bed is flock with dabs of paint. Where visible, the "earth" is ballast stuck down and painted brown before the foliage was added.
The white edging "stones" for the beds were made by gluing two sheets of my usual 160gsm card together then ripping them along the edge of a tenon saw to give the slightly matching yet rough uneven uneven edge that you get when making borders from individual stones.

All that remains is to find and fix in place something suitable to hide the gap where the "gravel" surface doesn't quite meet where the wall curves down at the start of the platform slope.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 13, 2019, 08:57:48 AM
Looking good
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: cornish yorkie on June 13, 2019, 11:40:33 AM
Looking good
  :hellosign:  Seconded
     regards Derek.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Black Sheep on June 13, 2019, 12:53:48 PM
All that remains is to find and fix in place something suitable to hide the gap where the "gravel" surface doesn't quite meet where the wall curves down at the start of the platform slope.

Sit the station cat there?  :)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: DarrwestLU6 on June 13, 2019, 12:56:49 PM
Beautiful modelling! Perhaps we can persuade you to come down to NGSE2020 next Spring and exhibit if a suitable B&B can be found? I would love to see it live!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 13, 2019, 01:44:53 PM
Would agree with darren there. Chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: belstone on June 13, 2019, 02:16:35 PM
Exceptional gardening modelling there.  Nice work.

Richard
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 13, 2019, 04:41:50 PM
All that remains is to find and fix in place something suitable to hide the gap where the "gravel" surface doesn't quite meet where the wall curves down at the start of the platform slope.

Sit the station cat there?  :)

Like it - of all the things I had so far considered, that was not one  :)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 13, 2019, 04:42:54 PM
Exceptional gardening modelling there.  Nice work.

Cheers - it was persisting down this morning so there was no way I was going to do any work in my real garden ;-)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 13, 2019, 04:47:39 PM
Beautiful modelling! Perhaps we can persuade you to come down to NGSE2020 next Spring and exhibit if a suitable B&B can be found? I would love to see it live!
Would agree with darren there. Chris

What's that creaking sound I can hear? Argh, it's the gates of doom opening to try and drag me in.

I'll give it some thought but no promises at this point - still a heck of a lot of work to be done. By when would you need to know?

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 13, 2019, 05:09:02 PM
Hi chris to answer you. As for exhibiting, dates re purley next year, darren's idea not mine. Jon snitchthe budgie and tank organise. I only steward, operate, help carry in out. Look forward to meeting and hearing more of coniston. Chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Chris in Prague on June 13, 2019, 08:15:43 PM
I particularly like the station name picked out in flowers. I believe some Southern stations had their name in white painted stones on a grass cut bank. I'm tempted to try that.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 13, 2019, 10:28:11 PM
I particularly like the station name picked out in flowers. I believe some Southern stations had their name in white painted stones on a grass cut bank. I'm tempted to try that.

I have a photo of the Coniston garden in BR days and they had the name picked out in what looks like small white stones on some form of background, can't tell what from a monochrome photo though.

I thought doing it in the flowers would be more interesting. That was the Mk2 version, just done on flock glued to the base. The Mk1 was tiny bits of clump foliage for the base layer in the same way as the other flower beds but I couldn't get the lettering to look good on such an uneven surface so scrapped that and went for the Mk2
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Chris in Prague on June 14, 2019, 08:10:26 AM
I agree flowers are more attractive but also more challenging. Yours looks very good. I remember elaborate floral displays in municipal parks in the 1960s and 1970s, at least.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: port perran on June 14, 2019, 08:52:11 AM
I agree flowers are more attractive but also more challenging. Yours looks very good. I remember elaborate floral displays in municipal parks in the 1960s and 1970s, at least.
Not sure about more challenging. Iím thinking doing it with flowers would be much easier. Trying to arrange tiny stones to form letters in such a tiny space would be, I think, very difficult.
But.....worth a try Chris.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Bealman on June 14, 2019, 08:55:15 AM
Personally, I'd leave well alone.  ;)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 14, 2019, 09:27:10 AM
Do not disturb flowerbed
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 14, 2019, 10:43:15 AM
I agree flowers are more attractive but also more challenging. Yours looks very good. I remember elaborate floral displays in municipal parks in the 1960s and 1970s, at least.
Not sure about more challenging. Iím thinking doing it with flowers would be much easier. Trying to arrange tiny stones to form letters in such a tiny space would be, I think, very difficult.
But.....worth a try Chris.

If you were to seal the grass/flock with, say, a matt varnish first, then the paint wouldn't soak in so you could use a fairly thick, gloopy, paint dotted on and the dots might well adequately resemble the stones.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 14, 2019, 10:48:10 AM
how are you doing with plans for modelling Broughton-in-Furness and torver chris ?
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 14, 2019, 11:11:55 AM
how are you doing with plans for modelling Broughton-in-Furness and torver chris ?

Crikey, give us a chance, I've still got lots to do on Coniston first - granted, very little on the scenic side bar all the little details to bring it to life but I've still a fair bit to do on the electrickery and operating side.

All I've done so far on the others is mull a few ideas over with regards to how I could set out the boards, probably using a single fiddle yard that could be connected to any one of them as I mentioned the other day but I still have to determine quite how to "tap" into the existing Coniston layout to get a line coming out to go to Torver. I'm guessing that I'll have to use a Y point in the curve just beyond the bridge at the southern end but haven't looked at locations an ease if access yet.

BTW, you missed out Woodland - if I do do more of the line that one is a must since, although it was a small station it was a block post and where up & down trains could cross. Torver wasn't.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 14, 2019, 11:23:02 AM
thanks for the update
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 15, 2019, 06:25:56 PM
A few more little jobs jobbed today.

Firstly, I've made the replacement coal yard office - with more in keeping slate walls;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-150619180734.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78539)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-150619180825.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78540)
It still needs some detritus and/or other stuff to hide the join with the ground but it looks better then the totally wrong stone one I had before. I also have to sort the boards to aid vehicles crossing the slate wharf siding to access the coal yard.

The ash pit is no longer a bottomless slot in the baseboard. Unfortunately, that means that the crews should dig out the ash when they've used it, a little retraining required methink, before it overflows,
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-150619180841.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78541)

And the turntable now has fences to stop bods falling into the pit, and handles for the crews to push when they want to turn their charge. It's also been given a coat of dirty black, and might get some rust sometime too.
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-150619180900.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78542)

I then turned my mind towards uncoupling, along the lines of this thread from a few years ago;
https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=30657.0 (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=30657.0)

The test wagon worked pretty well but I need to assess the best vehicles to put the magnets on for the most reliable results, since I have a right old mix of Peco Elsies, Farish swan-necks, Farish sprung Rapidos, Minitrix Rapidos and Lima Rapidos, plus whatever they are on the current Farish Stanier coaches and the Union Mills locos.

Neither the swan necks on my older Farish coaches nor those on the current Staniers will lift high enough using the magnets so I need to persevere with fitting the locos. Initially I wasn't having much success but I think that was partly down to the magnets I have being slightly too large and partially fouling the coupling opening. I managed to get ones working on both ends of the Jinty, which seems to have a little more space behind the coupling and I've ordered smaller magnets to try on the rest.

Having reached an impasse on that I decided to take the bottom off the Jinty to see if I could see why it was runnign so judderingly. I almost wish I hadn't as it was a real pain to get back together. I hadn't expected individual axleboxes running in real hornguides, even though they aren't sprung so don't go up and down - but they were a right pain to get refitted.
Still don't know what was causing the rough running, but it's gone so I'm happy.

Looks like I got the points switching reliably in pairs now - an extra 2200 microfarad capacitor added to the CDU, initially using croc clip leads, seemed to do the trick so that's been hard wired on now.

Further pictorial updates are likely to be more sporadic now since there isn't much significant work at present that will justify photos. I don't think pics of my soldering will be particularly inspiring   :o

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 15, 2019, 06:34:17 PM
Absolutely stunning. Chris. Am headhng out so will add commeots. Thank you for the photos. Chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 15, 2019, 11:08:00 PM
chris, thanks for posting photos of the replacement coal yard office and ashpit, beautifully modelled
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: port perran on June 16, 2019, 08:06:32 AM
Splendid modelling Chris.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 19, 2019, 02:43:16 PM
A little update to show that I haven't been idle, nor just "playing trains".

I've now got the relays circuit board completed and tested ready to put into the control panel when I remake that. The relays are to drive LEDs indicating the points settings, latching type so they "remember" the settings even if the power's turned off and tripped by a tap on a point stud. One is slightly modified to give a red/green indication as to whether the reversing wye polarity is correct for the point setting. I'll be remaking the control panel because it needs tidying up anyway and because I still hope to be able to get the signals operational so I'll need places for the switches for them.

As to the signals, I've had a few thoughts, one of which involves preventing SPADs. My thought is to have the signals set to "clear" by means of a solenoid controlled by a sprung toggle switch so they can't be left on for too long. I've had a further thought that I could isolate the track in advance of a signal and make those switches double pole so that clearing a signal also feeds power to the track - i.e. forget to clear the signal and the train stops. Obviously, that'd be a PITA if I'm just testing things, running in a loco or whatever so I've ordered double throw centre off switches with the spring return on one of the directions only. thus I can operate with the signals moving and the track only being powered when clear or throw the switches the other way to just power the track. I'll have to give thought to trains approaching from the back of a signal, possibly some diodes will fix that, i.e the track is always powered for trains coming out of the section protected by the signal but only powered for trains entering if the switch is thrown to clear the signal or for testing. Should be fun.

In the meantime, I've now received the new supply of magnets and fitted all my stock where possible so, in theory, I can uncouple and work the station correctly instead of a fake roundy roundy. In practice, I need a lot of practice at stopping trains in the right place  :D

Now, whilst I've been waiting for bits to arrive I've revisited this question.
how are you doing with plans for modelling Broughton-in-Furness and torver chris ?

I've been waving a tape measure around and fiddling with track plans and it would appear that (with a little modeller's licence) I can fit Torver into 6' x 2'6", Woodland into 6' x 2' and Broughton into 7'4" x 2'6", including a small fiddle yard behind each. I had intended to build them with a common fiddle yard to only be put on the back of the end one furthest from Coniston, depending how many I connect up. However, doing that would mean a nasty double reverse curve between stations (certainly coming off Coniston as that's already built) and also the possibility of a train arriving at one whilst the back was still in the previous one, yuk.

However, by including a loop at the back I could send a train out of, say, Coniston and it'd run around the back of Coniston, across to the Torver Board, along the back of Torver and round into the station - then it'd go around the back of Torver, cross to the Woodland board, along the back and round into the station, etc., etc. The only downside is that all the stations would be in geographically the wrong order but I can live with that, especially in view of the next paragraph.

By doing it this way and with that above board dimensions I reckon that I can fit all four into my spare room, almost the entire Coniston Railway in one room !!!! 

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-190619143059.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78654)
I'd even have just enough room to get to the back of Coniston should there be any mishaps in the fiddle yard. Wouldn't need room behind the others because they'd be narrow enough to reach across.
To include Foxfield, however, I'd have to buy the house next door and break through the wall, I don't think I'll bother with that  :D

My thoughts then wandered a little further, to should I decide (or be invited) to take it to any exhibitions. With different  linking bridges between the boards they could also be set up in a square arrangement, approx. 14' square, with the operator(s) in the middle and the viewing sides to the outside;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-190619143701.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78655)

or, even, all in a straight line, although that'd be some 28' long;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/78/7182-190619143757.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=78656)

I'd also need a bigger car to get them all in  :D

Still, food for thought.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 19, 2019, 03:07:25 PM
thanks chris.

can you fit the torver,woodland and broughton boards into your car or they going to stay at home ?
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on June 19, 2019, 03:39:39 PM
thanks chris.

can you fit the torver,woodland and broughton boards into your car or they going to stay at home ?

Assuming that I do do the lot, I'd do them each in two halves anyway so they'd definitely fit individually.
I wouldn't have to take up so much height for any of them, unlike Coniston with the ground below track level and that above, so it might prove possible to get two or, even, three of them in, depending on the other paraphernalia (legs or tables, control panels, cables, rolling stock, etc., etc.) needed.
I'd estimate that the baseboards would individually be between 1/3 and 1/2 the height of Coniston depending on what of the scenery/buildings can be made removable. Additionally, they'd be narrower so it'd be possible to stack some flat and some on edge beside them or in front of or behind the stack. In retrospect I think I did overengineer Coniston too  :-[

It's certainly not a goer to get any of them in as well as Coniston, I do know that. Coniston is definitely a full car, to the extent of taking up the passenger footwell as well as all the luggage area with the rear seats folded down. The three baseboards stacked fit in through the tailgate aperture with about half an inch to spare, heightwise. If I needed to take much more other stuff than I did taking Coniston down to the clubhouse I'd need to put stuff on the passenger seat as well  :D

One might think there could have been a bit of bad planning but, of course, I never anticipated at the outset getting on so quickly with Coniston so had never considered doing the others as well.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on June 19, 2019, 04:11:28 PM
keep up the good work on your journey. thank you
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: DarrwestLU6 on June 20, 2019, 12:37:21 AM
Looks like an excellent plan!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on July 29, 2019, 10:09:12 AM
As reported on The Coniston Railway thread, having got the track laid on Torver and moved into the testing phase, I've returned to Coniston to attend to a few outstanding jobs.

The first was to rewire some of the uncoupler solenoids. I originally intended to stick the little bits of metal under the couplings, but have changed my mind and stuck tiny magnets underneath instead. These have proved both more reliable and easier to use, in most cases. However, I found that they generally worked better using a 12v dc supply instead of 16v ac. There were three uncouplers that I was still having trouble using reliably, the reason becoming clear when I added a drop of white paint on the magnet fitted couplings - those three uncouplers were pulling the coupling down instead of pushing it up. When run off an ac supply it didn't matter but using a dc supply it does, so I've had to swap the wires on those uncouplers to make them repel instead of attract the magnets. They work much better now.

I then turned my attenton to one uncoupler that had stopped working - upon testing, I found that it was the switch at fault, not the solenoid nor wiring - no problem, the switch will be replaced when I complete and install the mkII mimic board and control panel.

Next, I started playing with the signals - well, one of them to start with. Hooray, I now have a signal that flaps down and up when I operate or release a switch, complete with an anti-SPAD function.

The signal is operated by a length of fine brass wire hooked onto the spectacle plate and running down beside the post to drop under the baseboard. Underneath, the wire is bent through 90 degrees and fits through a wire loop attached to the end of a little 4mm travel solenoid. when the solenoid is energised it pushes the wire, and spectacle plate, up thereby lowering the signal arm. When the power is removed, the solenoid is pulled back by means of a spring, pulling the spectacle plate down and returning the signal to danger. It still needs some tweaking to get the signal travel correct (it tends to return to a bit above the horizontal) and to improve the source power. 12v dc gives rather too vicious a movement and my Gaugemaster controller 12 dc uncontrolled output isn't particularly well smoothed so, for the time being I've got the signal working off a 9v battery.

The anti-SPAD function is a 6" section of track in front of the signal on which I've isolated the positive rail from the rest of the line and wired it into the signal switch. This is a double pole double throw centre off switch with a spring return on one of the throws only. One set of poles operates the signal whilst the other set connects the isolated track section to the rest of the track. Thus, the power is only fed to the track when the signal is set to clear. I have a diode in the circuit to allow trains to pass the signal from the back unimpeded, e.g. for arrivals where the signal is to control departures.
The signal is only operated by the sprung throw of the switch, whilst the track power is connected on both throws. This means that a) the signal solenoid is only energised when the signal needs to be cleared (and the switch has to be held down for that) but that b) the track can be permanently powered by setting the switch to the unsprung throw.
The latter allows for testing, just playing or for allowing a signal to be passed during shunting movements - particularly important when I do the signals at the southern end of the station since there's only room for a loco and 4 or 5 wagons between the advance starter signal and the goods yard entrance points. It was not, AFAIK, unprototypical for a shunting movement to be allowed to pass a signal at danger provided that it didn't pass the limit of shunt and that the signalman hadn't accepted a train into the block section affected.

Now I have the prototype powered signal installed, and once I've done the final tweaking, I can apply the same principle to the other seven. The entrance to the station could be fun, with five signals adjacent to each other controlling movements in both directions and with three of them being on a three-doll bracket post.

Before I do the other signals, though, I'm turning my attentions to some rather more drastic work - ripping up some track at both ends of the fiddle yard to insert points for the exits to Torver. While I'm around that side of (and underneath) the layout I've also got a dodgy power feed in one of the fiddle yard roads that I need to investigate and rectify.

That little lot will keep me busy while I'm testing Torver  ;)




Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on July 29, 2019, 11:13:27 AM
Look forward to the next stage in your cumbrian adventure. Thank you for the update. Chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: DarrwestLU6 on August 05, 2019, 11:12:48 AM
As reported on The Coniston Railway thread, having got the track laid on Torver and moved into the testing phase, I've returned to Coniston to attend to a few outstanding jobs.

The first was to rewire some of the uncoupler solenoids. I originally intended to stick the little bits of metal under the couplings, but have changed my mind and stuck tiny magnets underneath instead. These have proved both more reliable and easier to use, in most cases. However, I found that they generally worked better using a 12v dc supply instead of 16v ac. There were three uncouplers that I was still having trouble using reliably, the reason becoming clear when I added a drop of white paint on the magnet fitted couplings - those three uncouplers were pulling the coupling down instead of pushing it up. When run off an ac supply it didn't matter but using a dc supply it does, so I've had to swap the wires on those uncouplers to make them repel instead of attract the magnets. They work much better now.

I then turned my attenton to one uncoupler that had stopped working - upon testing, I found that it was the switch at fault, not the solenoid nor wiring - no problem, the switch will be replaced when I complete and install the mkII mimic board and control panel.

Next, I started playing with the signals - well, one of them to start with. Hooray, I now have a signal that flaps down and up when I operate or release a switch, complete with an anti-SPAD function.

The signal is operated by a length of fine brass wire hooked onto the spectacle plate and running down beside the post to drop under the baseboard. Underneath, the wire is bent through 90 degrees and fits through a wire loop attached to the end of a little 4mm travel solenoid. when the solenoid is energised it pushes the wire, and spectacle plate, up thereby lowering the signal arm. When the power is removed, the solenoid is pulled back by means of a spring, pulling the spectacle plate down and returning the signal to danger. It still needs some tweaking to get the signal travel correct (it tends to return to a bit above the horizontal) and to improve the source power. 12v dc gives rather too vicious a movement and my Gaugemaster controller 12 dc uncontrolled output isn't particularly well smoothed so, for the time being I've got the signal working off a 9v battery.

The anti-SPAD function is a 6" section of track in front of the signal on which I've isolated the positive rail from the rest of the line and wired it into the signal switch. This is a double pole double throw centre off switch with a spring return on one of the throws only. One set of poles operates the signal whilst the other set connects the isolated track section to the rest of the track. Thus, the power is only fed to the track when the signal is set to clear. I have a diode in the circuit to allow trains to pass the signal from the back unimpeded, e.g. for arrivals where the signal is to control departures.
The signal is only operated by the sprung throw of the switch, whilst the track power is connected on both throws. This means that a) the signal solenoid is only energised when the signal needs to be cleared (and the switch has to be held down for that) but that b) the track can be permanently powered by setting the switch to the unsprung throw.
The latter allows for testing, just playing or for allowing a signal to be passed during shunting movements - particularly important when I do the signals at the southern end of the station since there's only room for a loco and 4 or 5 wagons between the advance starter signal and the goods yard entrance points. It was not, AFAIK, unprototypical for a shunting movement to be allowed to pass a signal at danger provided that it didn't pass the limit of shunt and that the signalman hadn't accepted a train into the block section affected.

Now I have the prototype powered signal installed, and once I've done the final tweaking, I can apply the same principle to the other seven. The entrance to the station could be fun, with five signals adjacent to each other controlling movements in both directions and with three of them being on a three-doll bracket post.

Before I do the other signals, though, I'm turning my attentions to some rather more drastic work - ripping up some track at both ends of the fiddle yard to insert points for the exits to Torver. While I'm around that side of (and underneath) the layout I've also got a dodgy power feed in one of the fiddle yard roads that I need to investigate and rectify.

That little lot will keep me busy while I'm testing Torver  ;)

That's a really helpful set of tips - I will definitely use some of those - thank you!

Can I ask - what magnets did you use on the couplings? (And where did you get them from?)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on August 05, 2019, 11:24:00 AM
I'm turning my attentions to some rather more drastic work - ripping up some track at both ends of the fiddle yard to insert points for the exits to Torver

chris - essential p way work !!!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on August 05, 2019, 11:39:26 AM
That's a really helpful set of tips - I will definitely use some of those - thank you!

You're welcome, happy to help out where I can.

Quote
Can I ask - what magnets did you use on the couplings? (And where did you get them from?)

These are the little beasties I used;
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Tiny-magnets-2x1-mm-N52-grade-neodymium-disc-small-craft-magnet-2mm-dia-x-1mm/151445145416?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&var=450636718540&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649 (https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Tiny-magnets-2x1-mm-N52-grade-neodymium-disc-small-craft-magnet-2mm-dia-x-1mm/151445145416?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&var=450636718540&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649)

The critical things, based on my findings, to bear in mind are that;

1) you need to make sure that all the magnets are stuck onto the couplings the same way up on all vehicles, otherwise some couplings will get pulled down and some pushed up. Likewise, all the uncoupler solenoids need to be wired the same way round.
I found the easiest way for setting which way up to fit the magnets was firstly to stick one magnet on a thin strip of plasticard and hold that over an uncoupling solenoid to determine which way up the magnet needs to be to get repelled, then based on that test to mark one end of the stack of magnets with a dab of paint to indicate the side that shouldn't be glued before going ahead and gluing them to the couplings.

2) The magnets must not hang over the edge of the coupling at all, the "aperture" into which a mating coupling fits must be completely unobstructed otherwise it can give problems with coupling and uncoupling.

3) It's best to only fit the magnets to one end of an item of stock so that you don't couple two magnet-equipped couplings together - otherwise the solenoid will lift both couplings and they won't separate. That's why I've marked all mine with a dab of paint so I can make sure that I put the stock on the track the same way around.

Because I've equipped all of my locos with magnets both ends, I've left some wagons unfitted so that they can go at the front/back of a train to avoid getting two magnet fitted couplings together - hopefully ;)

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on August 05, 2019, 11:40:53 AM
I'm turning my attentions to some rather more drastic work - ripping up some track at both ends of the fiddle yard to insert points for the exits to Torver

chris - essential p way work !!!

Nope - drastic work.
It was all working nicely before, it remains to see if it still does when I've finished  :D
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: DarrwestLU6 on August 05, 2019, 11:43:25 AM
Thanks Chrism - really helpful!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on August 05, 2019, 11:54:26 AM
Good luck. Look forward to the next instalment chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on August 05, 2019, 12:27:49 PM
I'm turning my attentions to some rather more drastic work - ripping up some track at both ends of the fiddle yard to insert points for the exits to Torver

chris - essential p way work !!!

Nope - drastic work.
It was all working nicely before, it remains to see if it still does when I've finished  :D

The essential p-way work will be fixing it if I've bu....ed it up  :-[
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on August 05, 2019, 12:43:12 PM
hope it gets sorted chris. again look forward to the next episode of coniston
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on August 05, 2019, 01:04:32 PM
hope it gets sorted chris.

You and me both   :D

The current state of play is that I now have three signals (the starter signals for platforms 1,2 & 3) working remotely and with the track a few inches in advance of them wired so as to prevent a SPAD, with an override option to allow shunting movements to pass.

I've cut and wired the southern end approach tracks for the SPAD prevention for both arrivals and departures and I'm now working to get the next signals working. As anticipated they are more complicated because there is more than one arm on each post.
It was tricky enough manipulating a fragile signal arm, post and one operating wire - two arms (for the post holding the advance starter and arrival into the goods road signals) and two operating wires is proving more challenging for both the eyes and the dexterity.

Still, it'll be good practice for when I have to move across the track to do the 3-doll post with the arrival signals for platforms 1, 2 and 3 - all in the same assembly ;)


Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on August 05, 2019, 03:23:48 PM
Good luck with the signalling and associated mechanisms. Challenge number two. Always a challenge chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on August 12, 2019, 07:14:16 AM
Well, I now have as many signals working as I can get on Coniston.

After a lot of fiddling at the entrance to the station, I've had to accept that there simply isn't enough room under the baseboard to fit cranks and solenoids in for all five signals on two posts immediately opposite each other beside a single track, especially when they are close to a baseboard framing timber.  I have, therefore settled for one functioning signal in each direction - the advanced starter protecting the single line section and one of the arrival home signals on the three-doll bracket post. Only rivet counters will really complain if a train ends up in platform 3 when the signal allowing into the station was actually for platform 1.

Can't complain too much I suppose, at least I have all three starting signals working as well as the advance starter and one arrivals home signal, all with the means to prevent trains passing them when at danger.

I'm now putting in the proper wiring, starting with the plug in connection needed between baseboards 1 and 2 for the signals on baseboard 2, then I'll move on to the connection between baseboard 1 and the control panel to operate all the signals, plus supply the power for them.

Once that's done I can reassemble the layout and test the new point and trackwork that I've put in at the end of the fiddle yard for a diversion track out to Torver before I finally glue it all down and add the point motor. I might even add the linking board for actually sending trains to Torver.
Once I'm happy with that I can return to the currently half-built Mk2 control panel to get that finished and (finally) installed.

I do have one more point to insert between the exit from Coniston and the fiddle yard to allow exit from Coniston to the other stations on the rest of the Coniston Railway, should I have the opportunity to take some or all of them elsewhere - if you remember, at home I'll have the stations in the reverse order geographically so trains will progress from one station to the next be running along the back of both fiddle yards because that the only way I can fit them all into the room. With space to set them up in the correct geographic order, the trains will simply run out of, say, Coniston, over a short linking bridge and straight into, say, Torver without running along the back of both first.

The point that needs to go in will only require the track lifting and one power feed moving so I won't need to take it all apart again - hopefully. It won't even need a motor fitting, since it only needs to be set one way or the other depending on the configuration of the stations and won't need changing during operation. It also doesn't need to go in until there's a real likelihood that I will be taking the layouts somewhere.

No further progress on Torver to be reported on the Consiton Railway thread. I'm still waiting for Amazon to send me a properly working controller - the first two they've sent have dead spots in the speed control dial so have been rejected.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on August 12, 2019, 07:25:45 AM
thanks chris


hope you receive the correct working - properly controller and sort those signals. chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: DarrwestLU6 on August 18, 2019, 11:49:15 PM
Sounds good Chris. Please send photos of the new signals when you get time!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on August 19, 2019, 06:36:40 AM
Sounds good Chris. Please send photos of the new signals when you get time!

Will do - although it may take a little while since I've got to redesign my lighting setup.
Now I've fixed the Torver baseboard on the end of Coniston, there's nowhere for the legs of the lighting bar to go at that end any more  :doh:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on August 19, 2019, 06:46:10 AM
Not even fixed overhead so the lighting shines down? Ah have a good day,
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on August 19, 2019, 07:18:57 AM
Not even fixed overhead so the lighting shines down? Ah have a good day,

That's what I had - a bar over the layout with half a dozen LED bubs on it. However, it stood on A-frame legs at either end of the baseboard - one end of which is now obstructed  :doh:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: DarrwestLU6 on August 19, 2019, 07:30:29 AM
Could you move the A-frame to th end of Torver, then construct a longer lighting bar? Or build a cantilever?
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on August 19, 2019, 08:07:34 AM
Could you move the A-frame to th end of Torver, then construct a longer lighting bar? Or build a cantilever?

Can't put anything behind Torver, there's only just enough room for drawing the curtains as it is.
Anyway, I'll need to rig lighting for photographing Torver too (when there's enough to be worth it) and, later, Woodland and Broughton. They'll all be at different angles as they will loop around the room.
Some form of cantilever will probably be best but I need to design it to give the flexibility to fit in and use for anywhere on the multiple layouts.

I'll get it worked out eventually - yet another job near the top of the ever lengthening "to do" list.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on August 31, 2019, 12:01:17 PM
Well, I'm getting there with the electrickery at last. Coniston now has a "Christmas Tree" in the shape of the fiddle yard control panel now being completed;

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/81/7182-310819113211.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=81021)

Each of the points has two LEDS, whether those are on or off being controlled by a latching relay triggered off the direction setting studs so, provided nobody's been playing with the points by hand, they indicate all the points settings - and retain them if the layout is powered down.

The Green LED, by the switch labelled C1 & C2, indicates to which controller the fiddle yard is connected - C1 (green) being the main controller and C2 (which shows red) being a secondary controller for various sections of the layout (including the turntable rotation power). The idea of that is so that I could send a train on its way into the station and do a little shunting in the fiddle yard whilst waiting for it to arrive. The switch also has a centre-off setting so I can just switch the yard off completely if I wish, in which case the LED is extinguished.

The greeny-yellow LED beside the Reversing Wye Polarity Switch is a bi-colour one to indicate if the  track polarity is correct for the Wye (point 33) direction. If it's not, the LED will display red. This is controlled by the other two contact sets in the relay for point 33 (each relay has four sets) and by having the polarity switch a Quad-Pole Double Throw one. The default display is red, but if both the relay setting and the switch setting match, then the green side of the LED is lit as well.

The switches in four of the loop roads are for uncouplers.

Having wired it all up, I've found that the LEDs can be a bit "intense" as the evening draws in so I plan to add a potentiometer to the power feed so the brightness may be adjusted. However, I won't do that until I also have the station control panel completed and installed so I can see how bright they all are with maximum load.

The station Mk2 control panel is completed as far as I can for now because the switches I've ordered are still (hopefully) on a slow boat from China. Once they arrive, I can fit them, wire them in and strip out the Mk1 panel to replace it with the Mk2.

In the meantime, I've started on wiring the fiddle yard boards for Torver. All the wires are in and tested for continuity - since they run through connectors between the two boards and ones out to what will be the control panel. The track power has been tested to check that it drives a loco and the uncouplers have been tested and proved to be working the right way round, i.e. lifting the couplings, not pulling them down. Next job is to fit the point motors then I can wire them up before putting it to one side whilst I do likewise for Torver's station baseboards.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on August 31, 2019, 12:19:08 PM
Looking good. You pleased with that chris? Certainly a well written piece. Chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on August 31, 2019, 01:14:49 PM
Looking good. You pleased with that chris?

I am thanks, yes. It does what it's meant to do, which was the object of the exercise. It saves me either peering across to the back of the board to see where the points are set (which won't be possible when the backscene is in place, or firing them a couple of times to make sure they are where I want.

The right-hand half, the station control panel, will look neater because it won't have so many amendments - just the signal switch locations blanked off for the three that I couldn't get working. Obviously it'll be busier than the fiddle yard panel, having more track, points, uncouplers, isolating sections, etc. and, of course, some signals ;)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on August 31, 2019, 01:38:40 PM
Good luck. Im no electric expert. Be good to see torver scenics included. Thank you for the update
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on August 31, 2019, 01:45:50 PM
Good luck. Im no electric expert. Be good to see torver scenics included.

Afraid that's some way off yet - electrics to do first, then more testing to make sure it's all OK before ballasting. Only once that's done can I really start to thing about the scenics.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Train Waiting on August 31, 2019, 01:53:18 PM
That's a very impressive route-setting panel, Chris.

Great stuff!

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on August 31, 2019, 02:36:25 PM
Seconded. Chris. That control panel amazing. One for each section i take it. Have fun with the project
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on August 31, 2019, 02:48:54 PM
That's a very impressive route-setting panel, Chris.
Great stuff!
Best wishes.
John
Seconded. Chris. That control panel amazing. One for each section i take it. Have fun with the project

Thanks guys, just wait till I've got the Coniston station part done, that's more interesting - and challenging ;)

For Coniston I have a single control panel box, but felt that trying to put the fiddle yard on the back of the station would make it far too cramped, heightwise. Hence doing it as two halves, one for each part, but both side by side mounted on the same box..

It'll be different for the rest of the Coniston Railway because I'm building the rest in a different way. There will be one baseboard for each station and one for each of the types of fiddle yard, each of which can go behind any of the stations.
Therefore, I'll be making individual control panels for each of the stations and for each of the fiddle yards, then each station will be adorned with two control panels according to how I've got it set up.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on August 31, 2019, 03:36:41 PM
We look forward to progress and love the controller panel. Bit by bit. Agree  best panel for each section eg one for coniston, one torver, woodland and boughton. Thanks for sharing chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on August 31, 2019, 05:51:09 PM
Now it makes sense re reading your thread after work today chris. Did you construct the panel or buy please? Thanks chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on August 31, 2019, 07:07:47 PM
Now it makes sense re reading your thread after work today chris. Did you construct the panel or buy please?

The structure was two wooden shelf brackets to which I added timbers to make a box. The bootom is 5mm ply, into which the d-sub plugs/sockets are fitted.
The working surfaces are thick polystyrene sheet, topped with the track layout designed in Photoshop and printed out on decent white card, finally topped off with OHP film to give a wipe-clean surface.

For the others, I'll use 3mm ply for the working surface, still with a printed plan and plastic covering. Haven't yet decided what the box structure will be, depends how much wiring, etc has to fit inside dictating how deep they need to be.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on September 08, 2019, 12:55:16 PM
Yaay, Coniston is finished - like heck is it, is a model railway ever finished?

Still, the build is now finished. Having received the switches that I was awaiting, I've now completed and installed the Mk2 Control Panel;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/81/7182-080919120647.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=81201)

Here's a view of just the control panel;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/81/7182-080919120730.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=81202)

The switches with LEDs beside them are for isolated sections, which may be controlled by Controller 1 (the default and which controls the rest of the layout), Controller 2 (for if I wish to conduct movements independently of a train being worked by Controller 1, for example shifting stock around in the fiddle yard) or, simply, off. All are DPDT centre off switches, one set of poles being for the track power, the other for the LEDs which light green for Controller, red for Controller 2 or off for no track power.

The switches with signal symbols beside them are for, well, signals. These are DPDT centre off sprung one way switches. One set of poles is for switching on the signal solenoids, on the sprung throw only so I can't leave a solenoid on by mistake. The other poles short out a diode connecting the track section immediately in advance of the signal post, on both throws. This means that a train may pass the signal from the rear at any time but may only pass it from the front if a) the signal is clear or b) the switch is set to the testing (playing) mode.

The switches labelled UC are for the uncoupling solenoids, these are SPST sprung switches. I opted for these because I wasn't keen on the pushbuttons that came with the solenoids.

The points setting LEDs are controlled by relays, triggered by the pulses from the studs and probe for changing the points.  Being latching relays, when I power up the layout all the indicators show the points settings immediately - provided I haven't been fiddling with the points while it was powered down of course.

Now, in response to DarrwestLU6's request, the signals.

Jubilee 5664 Nelson is at the end of platform 2, waiting to depart with the return excursion from Blackpool;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/81/7182-080919120757.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=81203)

Meanwhile, at the southern end of the station, nothing is happening;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/81/7182-080919120845.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=81205)

Ah, the starter has come off and Neslon can depart;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/81/7182-080919120821.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=81204)

Since the advanced starter is also off, Nelson may proceed into the single line section;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/81/7182-080919120913.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=81206)

Still at the south end of the station, the excursion must have passed Woodland now because the home signal for an arrival into platform 1 has been pulled off;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/81/7182-080919120947.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=81207)

and Ivatt 2MT (Mickey Mouse) 6404 arrives with the local passenger service;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/81/7182-080919121016.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=81208)

The four home signals are, respectively from right to left, for arrivals into platforms 1, 2 & 3, on the 3-doll bracket post, and into the goods loop, on the reverse of the post with the advanced starter. However, due to lack of space under the board I've only been able to make the advanced starter and the platform 1 arrivals signals work. The rest are fixed, although it rather looks as if the platform 3 one needs fixing better ;-) I'll do that when I add the ladders to all the signal posts.


As I said, the build stage of Coniston is now complete so all (all, he says !!!) that is left is to bring it to life with the addition of people, animals, freight loads in the goods yard, the occasional pile of tatt that would undoubtedly have been left lying around, etc., etc. When conditions and time permit, I still have to take the photographs for the real backscene too. Unfortunately so far this year when there has been decent weather and light it's also been unpleasantly hazy so I haven't had the opportunity yet :(


In the meantime, however, plenty to do on Torver. I'll be posting the current state of progress there on the Coniston Railway thread in a little while - https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=45685.msg575614#msg575614 (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=45685.msg575614#msg575614)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on September 08, 2019, 01:07:11 PM
thanks chris

feels like im standing in coniston admiring your layout !!!!


like the control panel but i leave that darren 's way - he is the club guru !!!

love the Jubilee and the fine selection of locos and stockin such a beautiful setting. have to be proud of those signals chris


Chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: port perran on September 08, 2019, 01:17:54 PM
Chris
That is a lovely layout.
That control panel looks mightily impressive (especially to someone who knows just about nothing as far as electrickery is concerned) but itís the scenic elements that I like.
Superb modelling.

Martin
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on September 08, 2019, 01:19:15 PM
martin

i sceond that. chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on September 08, 2019, 01:54:16 PM
Thanks, guys.

I'm pleased with the control panel, but I learned one important thing when assembling it - don't make the darned thing so narrow and deep. It's only about 6" wide but 3" deep at the front, tapering out to 7" deep at the back with the circuit board for all the relays and the connectors for the cables out to the various baseboards on the bottom. Fishing for and fitting all the wires gave me a good impression of what it must be like for a surgeon who has to perform surgery on the front of a patient's spine but has to go in through the belly  :D

The ones for Torver, etc. will be of similar style on top but far, far, shallower ;)


Something I forgot to mention before - the blue "thing" near the middle of the panel is a brightness control. I found that as evening draws in, the LEDS on full brightness were way too bright so I added a potentiometer into their power feed so I can turn them down and see the point operating studs again.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Chris in Prague on September 08, 2019, 03:45:11 PM
Chris
That is a lovely layout.
That control panel looks mightily impressive (especially to someone who knows just about nothing as far as electrickery is concerned) but itís the scenic elements that I like.
Superb modelling.

Martin

I third that! 8-)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: DarrwestLU6 on September 10, 2019, 12:13:59 AM
Great looking panels and signals! Thank you for posting. Looking forward to seeing the layout live someday...
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on September 11, 2019, 06:29:23 AM
Great looking panels and signals! Thank you for posting.

Thanks mate.

Looking forward to seeing the layout live someday...

You may have a bit of a journey, I fear. Unless it gets invited somewhere else, the only showings are likely to be local - i.e. open days at the clubrooms just outside Millom or, if we do one, an exhibition at a larger venue in Millom itself. We are considering doing another open day, possibly sometime before Christmas but unlikely to be able to set up an exhibition before 2021.

Of course, if anyone did want to come up to the South Lakes they could always make a weekend of it and also go to see what's left of the original station site.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on September 11, 2019, 06:33:57 AM
Thank you for your kind offer will bear that in mind
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: DarrwestLU6 on September 17, 2019, 09:34:18 AM
Chrism - May I ask what you made the control panels from? It looks like a white panel board or hardboard? How did you print the labels on there?
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on September 17, 2019, 10:40:34 AM
Chrism - May I ask what you made the control panels from? It looks like a white panel board or hardboard? How did you print the labels on there?

The base of the panels was thick plastic (although for Torver, etc. it'll be 3mm plywood coz I've run out of that plastic).
On top of that is the mimic panel layer, designed in Photoshop and printed onto decent white card.
Finally, I topped them off with clear plastic - actually old OHP slides that I happened to have.

I firstly used a sacrificial print of the mimic panel to mark where the holes needed to be drilled for the point changing studs, LEDs and switches, then drilled all the holes in the backing sheet. Then I offered up the real print, checking alignment with a bright light behind so I could see where the holes were, and glued it down. Then I glued the clear plastic on top before punching the holes down through the clear plastic and card into the drilled holes - again, with a bright light behind so the holes showed up - then opening the ones out for switches with a scalpel.

After fitting all the studs and switches then came the "fun" bit - adding umpteen yards of multicoloured spaghetti to, hopefully, the right bits. I don't think I did too badly to be honest - out of all the wiring to be done, I only got two points' indicator LEDs the wrong way around first go, indicating left when the point went right  :-[

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: DarrwestLU6 on September 17, 2019, 06:54:44 PM
Thatís very helpful- thank you!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on September 29, 2019, 08:58:06 AM
At last I've got rid of the dreadfully oversized trees for the backscene on Coniston.
I finally managed to match up some spare time and decent weather conditions so I could take some photos in order to make the backscene, so here are a few shots showing the Coniston model in the real setting;


(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/82/7182-290919083748.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=82082)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/82/7182-290919083808.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=82083)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/82/7182-290919083826.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=82084)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/82/7182-290919083842.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=82085)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/82/7182-290919083902.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=82086)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/82/7182-290919083921.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=82087)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/82/7182-290919083938.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=82088)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/82/7182-290919083956.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=82089)

I still have to research when the houses were built since I suspect that up to three of them are too recent  for my late-thirties to early-forties timescale. The dark house in the middle was definitely there from at least as late as 1908, but whether or not it had the dormer windows I don't know yet. The row of terraced cottages and larger building behind them were also there at that time. If I can identify which of the other three houses are too recent, then they'll get photoshopped out before I get the final print made. I also need to extend both ends to provide the wraparound ends to the front of the baseboard.

There is a disparity with the perspective because the photos were taken from just outside the village, therefore looking up at the scene so doesn't really match with looking down on the model but there isn't much I can do about that. Likewise, they are seen from slightly south of the centre so look a tad odd if looking from north of there on the model, again not much I can do there.
I did have to cheat a bit at the northern end, due to a large tree blocking the field of view so the woodland that I could get photographed had to be extended. However, I doubt that many people will really notice - hopefully they'll be concentrating more on what's in front. Either way, it beats a row of oversized trees along the back and I'm happy with that ;)

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Innovationgame on September 29, 2019, 09:00:37 AM
I think it works very well.  Extremely impressive.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on September 29, 2019, 09:03:50 AM
chris



stunning - those houses must be late Victorian period

absolutely amazing. are we standing on your station admiring the view ? and taking in the atmosphere ?
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: exmouthcraig on September 29, 2019, 09:08:08 AM
Looks fantastic Chris, on the subjects of houses, if we take the 2nd from last picture,

The house above the cattle wagon looks too new
The house to the right of that I'd just tile over the roof windows, velux windows didn't appear till the 70s and previous to that would be a Georgian wired pane of glass under the slates, normally to light up the long dark landings on terraced houses.
The block of 3 to the right of that the left one looks spot on with the little dormer and wooden bar windows, the other 2 look too new with bigger dormers and pvc windows.

Other than that it looks absolutely fantastic  :claphappy:
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on September 29, 2019, 09:11:26 AM
the scenics give extra depth and fit round the station. im just standing back picturing myself from where you took those shots !!!!!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: port perran on September 29, 2019, 09:48:29 AM
That works beautifully and gives a real feeling of depth to the layout.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on September 29, 2019, 10:09:08 AM
Thanks, everyone.

Looks fantastic Chris, on the subjects of houses, if we take the 2nd from last picture,
The house above the cattle wagon looks too new
The house to the right of that I'd just tile over the roof windows, velux windows didn't appear till the 70s and previous to that would be a Georgian wired pane of glass under the slates, normally to light up the long dark landings on terraced houses.
The block of 3 to the right of that the left one looks spot on with the little dormer and wooden bar windows, the other 2 look too new with bigger dormers and pvc windows.

Cheers, that's pretty much my own thoughts too. The third from the left (the dark one, actually a block of four) was definitely there as early as 1895 because it appears on an OS map with that revision year. however, it didn't have the dormer windows on the three leftmost as late as 1905-08 - I have a photo dating from then which shows it without.

Tobe honest, I'm tempted to zap all except the pre-1895 one, especially the two to the left. Less sure about the rightmost one though. It "could" be  from the 1920s but updated, it certainly has more of a Lakeland style.

I've no concerns about the rows of cottages at the southern end - they also appear on the 1895 map
I'll keep looking for any photos which might clarify things - in between working on Torver and Woodland, of course.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Innovationgame on September 29, 2019, 10:13:07 AM
I wouldn't worry about the roof lights.  Such windows were about much earlier, although they may not have been Velux.  For example see M Hulot's Holiday.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: exmouthcraig on September 29, 2019, 10:29:39 AM
I wouldn't worry about the roof lights.  Such windows were about much earlier, although they may not have been Velux.  For example see M Hulot's Holiday.

Indeed, he pokes himself out of a cast iron Victorian skylight, we have refurbed a good few over the years BUT from a roof line photo would look remarkably different to the ones on the house in the photo.

Roofs are a very good indicator of dates, the best "mistakes" are that period dramas rub out the road markings with granite chippings and remove bus shelters and road signs but tv aerials and roof windows cant be easily hidden and for certain  people (mention no names  :-[) I look straight to the roof lines to find the mistakes.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on September 29, 2019, 10:43:38 AM
Getting there, I've now located a photo from 1950 - the pre-1895 block of four houses didn't have the dormer windows then, and neither of the two houses to the left of it were there. Just the one to the right to track down now before I fire up photoshop again.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: Chris in Prague on September 29, 2019, 12:23:31 PM
I think it works very well.  Extremely impressive.

Seconded!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: cornish yorkie on September 29, 2019, 05:32:17 PM
I think it works very well.  Extremely impressive.
:hellosign:
  Got to agree, just looks so right
       regards Derek.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: DarrwestLU6 on October 13, 2019, 01:10:44 PM
A looks pretty impressive so far - it is just like being there on the hill watching the trains go by!
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on December 06, 2019, 05:27:18 PM
As I've covered on the Coniston Railway thread, Coniston has now moved about eight feet downwards and taken up residence in my lounge along with Torver so that I can work on link boards to join them together end to end and work on the practicalities (or otherwise) of working the layouts from the back.

I had, as I suspected I would, some work to do since I hadn't touched the rear connectors since the initial testing after I'd fitted them. Half a dozen points were firing the wrong way compared to the control panel so those have now been rectified and it all works the same from the back as it does from the front with the exception of the uncouplers in the fiddle yard. I can live with that, though, since the yard is right in front of the operator so the hand of God can be used - if the fiddle yard is even being used at all, if I'm running Torver as well, trains will come from and go back to  Torver and the only use for Coniston's fiddle yard will be the odd rake of wagons going up to the Copper House near the mines.

If I'd had any doubts whatsoever that I'd need some arrangement of mirrors to be able to see what's going on from the back, this is the decider. These shots are all that I can see from the back - and that's without a backscene.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/84/7182-061219172311.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=84847)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/84/7182-061219172329.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=84848)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/84/7182-061219172349.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=84849)

The worst of the lot is the Southern end, where I can't see anything of the station throat at all. In the middle, I cannot see the coal siding nor the cattle dock - if I lean across as far as I can from one specific angle I can see the very top of a loco in the coal siding, but no wagons.

Mirrors are definitely called for  ;)
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on December 06, 2019, 05:31:03 PM
Looking good chris
 Would certainly suggest mirrors cheaper than mini cameras mounted on boards screwed at the back.  Chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on December 06, 2019, 07:12:06 PM
Looking good chris
 Would certainly suggest mirrors cheaper than mini cameras mounted on boards screwed at the back.  Chris

Agreed, more reliable and don't need yet more kit to be able to see what they can see.

I've got some A4 acrylic mirrors on order and today a small roll of mylar arrived so I'll be experimenting to see which gives the best results.

I won't need mirrors all the way along, just (ideally) so that I can clearly see all the points and uncoupler locations. I'm sure that by moving around I'll be able to see everything else albeit less clearly but where clarity's not so essential.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on December 06, 2019, 07:22:48 PM
I was taught by newportnobby mick in his thread Re : Kimbolted - the layout room and used cheap shaving mirrors mounted to 47mm by 47mm triangular timber screwed  up to 20 inches high works with the blindspots in the fiddleyard and £7 outlay. Would his idea work using that method?  Chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on December 06, 2019, 07:53:33 PM
I was taught by newportnobby mick in his thread Re : Kimbolted - the layout room and used cheap shaving mirrors mounted to 47mm by 47mm triangular timber screwed  up to 20 inches high works with the blindspots in the fiddleyard and £7 outlay. Would his idea work using that method?  Chris

Mick pointed me to that in my Coniston Railway thread. However, I don't think it'll do the trick for me because I don't just need to eliminate blind spots.

As well as seeing that stock is clear of a point before I change the road, I also need to be able to see accurately when a loco or wagon is correctly positioned over an uncoupler for running around or shunting.

One long or several suitably positioned and angled short flat mirrors should do the trick, I hope.

Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on December 06, 2019, 08:09:40 PM
Please let us all know how the acrylic mirors work
 Interesting idea though
Are you mounting them on the 47 x 47 timber or otherwise chris ?
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on December 06, 2019, 09:24:21 PM
Please let us all know how the acrylic mirors work
 Interesting idea though
Are you mounting them on the 47 x 47 timber or otherwise chris ?

I might be going with the mylar actually. Just tried stapling a bit to a sheet of wood and, although not a reflection I'd be happy trying to shave in, it seemed a perfectly acceptable reflection for what I need - especially if I can get it stretched tighter.
I'll have another play with it tomorrow, if it does the trick then the acrylic mirrors can go back to Amazon   ;)

The general idea is to have a lightweight timber rail (or frame) running the full length of the layout, stood on legs screwed to the layout ends such that it's high enough that it's higher than the backscene, then fix the mirror(s) to that at a suitable angle (somewhere in the region of 45 degrees, I guess) so that looking straight across from the control panel location results in seeing vertically down onto the layout.

The same mounting rail could have a nameboard on the front to hide the back of the mirror(s) and, possibly, information panels. Between the mirror(s) and the nameboard I could possibly fit some LED lighting as well.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on December 06, 2019, 09:30:53 PM
Look forward to hearing how you get on  anyway
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: chrism on December 14, 2019, 01:48:37 PM
Please let us all know how the acrylic mirors work
 Interesting idea though

Right, after a bit of experimenting and tweaking, I've determined that three of the A4 size acrylic mirrors will do the job. One will cover the station throat, one the goods yard & south end of the platforms and the third the north end of the platforms.
I did play a bit more with the mylar but decided that something rigid enough upon which to stretch it adequately would weigh more than the three acrylic mirrors.

All three mirrors above the layout;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/85/7182-141219133331.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=85104)

The station throat one;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/85/7182-141219133425.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=85105)

South end of the platforms and goods yard;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/85/7182-141219133444.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=85106)

North end of the platforms;
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/85/7182-141219133505.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=85107)

As positioned I can see the points and the uncouplers locations, and by moving slightly from one side to the other, the field of view in each mirror can be extended to reach the FoV of the next one, so I will be able to see pretty well the entire layout.

The mirrors are only loosely fitted at present (actually dangling off the legs I use for the lighting bar, hence the poor lighting in the pics) while I was experimenting with positions, heights and angles, so the next task is to make the proper supports. My thoughts are tending towards legs and outriggers from behind the backscene supporting a lightweight frame holding the mirrors - if I design it right I should be able to turn the frame around and see the fiddle yard with the backscene in place when operating from the front instead.

If it works then, when I get around to it, I'll do something similar for Torver, Woodland and Broughton - although they will only need the mirrors if they have the fiddle yard fitted. If they don't, then the operating position is closer so I can see over the backscene directly.
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on December 14, 2019, 02:32:11 PM
Coniston operations  control chris
Title: Re: Coniston
Post by: crewearpley40 on December 14, 2019, 05:34:27 PM
Looking reslly impressive chris