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General Category => Real Railway Discussion => Topic started by: Bikeracer on September 09, 2011, 07:55:17 AM

Title: Abbreviations
Post by: Bikeracer on September 09, 2011, 07:55:17 AM
I only started railway modelling at Easter this year and have very little knowledge regarding  rolling stock.In a post I've just read there have been the following abbreviations.....BG, GUV, CCT, BSO, BSK and TPO mentioned and I don't have a clue what they are.
Its the same with steam loco abbreviations. Diesels aren't really a problem because they're just a number.

Not everyone comes into this hobby with previous knowledge and it would be handy if there was a sticky for newbies in this forum with a list of different abbreviations.

There seem to be a lot of OT stickies that are nothing to do with railway modelling at all and IMHO it might be better if there was an OT topic category just for OT posts..

Allan
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: tadpole on September 09, 2011, 08:10:11 AM
good idea, but just to kick you off:

BG = Brake gangway (parcel/guards van)
GUV = General(?) Utitily Van
CCT = Hmmmm, I know what one is, but what does it stand for?
BSO = Brake Second Open
BSK = Brake Second with compartments and a side Korridor (BFK and BCK would be first class and composite equivalents)
TPO = Travelling Post Office

In general:
B = brake, G = gangway, V = van, T = trailer, M = motor, D = driving cab
O = open seating, K = compartments
F, S and C = first, second and composite (both) classes respectively
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Newportnobby on September 09, 2011, 08:24:58 AM
It does make you wonder who came up with the letter K for 'compartment' and 'corridor' ;D
Mind you, it could be the same person who devised the three 'R's' (reading, writing and arithmetic) ??? ::)
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: BernardTPM on September 09, 2011, 09:02:19 AM
K = side corridor, non-corridor compartment stock doesn't have any letter for compartments, hence BT = non-corridor Brake Third. This non-corridor stock is often referred to as 'suburban'.
CCT = Covered Carriage Truck 4-wheeled. The Southern version also had a variation without end doors called PMV = Parcels Miscellaneous Van.
R covers catering coaches. When K is used with R it means Kitchen, not side corridor!
SL for sleepers

TPO isn't really part of the above (LNER derived) coach designations, but a more general abbreviation, as they come in several versions: Stowage, Sorting, Brake, with and without Nets.

TOPS codes are another set of letters entirely. In the old code above SPV = Special Parcels Van (ex-'Blue Spot' Fish vans) whereas in TOPS SPV = Vacuum braked Plate wagon (S= 4-wheel steel carrier, P=plate, V=vacuum brake)
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: moogle on September 09, 2011, 09:28:01 AM
I was about to say what CCT stands for but Bernard beat me to it!

It could also stand for http://www.cctrailroad.com/ (http://www.cctrailroad.com/)  ;)
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: poliss on September 09, 2011, 01:46:50 PM
There are lists of commonly used abbreviations on the SEMGO website. http://www.semgonline.com/abbr_01.html
http://www.semgonline.com/coach/codes.html
http://www.semgonline.com/proto/emudes.html
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Mustermark on September 09, 2011, 03:55:35 PM
I've been modelling for years and still don't know what many of these actually stand for, or even are.

It gets even more mind-numbing with JJA (my autoballasters are called JJA) and TEA (my weathered china clay bullets are called TEA, I think) etc.

I'm not sure what an OT post is, but whatever one is, it's a great idea to have sticky topics with this kind of info in it.
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: BernardTPM on September 09, 2011, 04:14:56 PM
It gets even more mind-numbing with JJA (my autoballasters are called JJA) and TEA (my weathered china clay bullets are called TEA, I think) etc.
I think you'll find they are TIA, TEA are 100tone/102tonne oil tanks. (or a cuppa  :thumbsup:)
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Mustermark on September 09, 2011, 04:24:25 PM
Thanks! :thumbsup: I stand corrected.  Just goes to show how useful a sticky topic would be! ;D
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: poliss on September 09, 2011, 04:28:52 PM
All about the codes.
The British Rail Tops(Total Operations Processing System) project (including BOTTOMS)
http://www.les-smith.com/software/tops.htm

BR Wagon Codes - Wagon Diagrams and Design codes
http://www.ltsv.com/w_ref_codes_design.php
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: grid078 on September 09, 2011, 04:30:09 PM
"I'm not sure what an OT post is, but whatever one is, it's a great idea to have sticky topics with this kind of info in it."

  OT is "off topic" post.

Stu
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Mustermark on September 09, 2011, 04:53:39 PM
Aha, thanks Stu.  Have re-read the OP and now understand better.
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: BlythStationLad on September 09, 2011, 05:45:07 PM
I work on the railway and it doesn't get any easier with all the abbreviations for modern passenger stock, either: class 220/221 Voyagers have DMF/MS(A)/MS(B)/DMSL for example. Don't get me started on HSTS!
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: EtchedPixels on September 10, 2011, 10:53:06 PM
I work on the railway and it doesn't get any easier with all the abbreviations for modern passenger stock, either: class 220/221 Voyagers have DMF/MS(A)/MS(B)/DMSL for example. Don't get me started on HSTS!

DMSL on a voyager can only be one thing "driving, mysterious smell, lavatory"

Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: 4x2 on September 10, 2011, 10:57:22 PM
I work on the railway and it doesn't get any easier with all the abbreviations for modern passenger stock, either: class 220/221 Voyagers have DMF/MS(A)/MS(B)/DMSL for example. Don't get me started on HSTS!

DMSL on a voyager can only be one thing "driving, mysterious smell, lavatory"


OR 'Danger May get Stuck in Loo  :smiley-laughing:
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: OwL on September 10, 2011, 10:58:41 PM
TPWS = train protection and warning system: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Train_Protection_%26_Warning_System

Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Newportnobby on September 10, 2011, 11:00:21 PM
EWS = Early Warning System.....................or something else ??? :evil:
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: cloughie on September 11, 2011, 12:43:25 PM
these mybe of interest
http://www.lmsca.org.uk/lms-coaches/lms-coach-codes.php

http://www.abrail.co.uk/coach_codes.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:British_Rail_coaching_stock
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Bluebottle on January 25, 2012, 11:32:27 PM
G.W.R steam locomotive boiler pressure gauge always read by western footplate crews as R=right, W=wrong, G=gone!
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: 4x2 on January 26, 2012, 12:09:16 AM
My favourite, being an Somerset & Dorset fan is...

S&D - Sabbotaged and Defeated

Living in Bristol, i always loved the GWR and then i found out what naughtieness they got upto with the S&D....

Don't think i hate the GWR, they're still in my top three favourite liveries/companies - they're just on the naughty step !  :smiley-laughing:
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Lawrence on January 26, 2012, 08:42:21 AM
I exchanged a couple of email with Ben Jones (Modelrail Editor) about this as, whilst I enjoy the magazine, my interest (knowledge) off British Railways is limited to say the least.  He said that they would endeavour to better explain acronyms used in their magazines, cant say I have noticed a great change and this months issues included an EPB  ???

He did send me the link to the Southern E  Group and also this one http://dspace.dial.pipex.com/town/square/ca14/ALYCIDON%20RAIL/trac.htm (http://dspace.dial.pipex.com/town/square/ca14/ALYCIDON%20RAIL/trac.htm)

I still find myself puzzled on a regular basis but I am getting there (what is a CEP anyway  :-\ )
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Calnefoxile on January 26, 2012, 08:57:23 AM
I still find myself puzzled on a regular basis but I am getting there (what is a CEP anyway  :-\ )

A CEP is a Corridor EPB  ;) ;)

In other words Corridor Electro-Pneumatic Braking. VEP being Vestibule Electro-Pneumatic.

I could go on, but I'd be here all day  ;D ;D

Cheers

Neal.
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Lawrence on January 26, 2012, 09:01:32 AM
I still find myself puzzled on a regular basis but I am getting there (what is a CEP anyway  :-\ )

A CEP is a Corridor EPB  ;) ;)

In other words Corridor Electro-Pneumatic Braking. VEP being Vestibule Electro-Pneumatic.

I could go on, but I'd be here all day  ;D ;D

Cheers

Neal.

So why isn't it a VEPB then or CEPB  ??? ???  Just daft, acronyms for the sake of it  ::)
Railways are not alone though, aviation is not much better, switching from Tornado to Typhoon has been like trying to learn double Dutch, thank you BAEs  :(
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: tadpole on January 26, 2012, 09:35:50 AM
I'm sure if they were "starting from scratch" with SR EMU abbreviations, they'd come up with something much more logical, rather than the mish-mash they ended up with.

Obscure as the definitions might have been, to us oldies anyway, 4SUB or 4VEP was much snappier than the current class 423, 450, whatever. They at least gave a clue as to what the unit was and what it was used for (although the letters EP on most of the classes could've been replaced by something more useful - except on the 4REPs, where it meant Restaurant Extremely Powerful).

Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: StufromEGDL on January 26, 2012, 10:01:14 AM
I could go on, but I'd be here all day  ;D ;D

Cheers

Neal.

Neal;

You ARE on here all day!!!

Later;
STU from EGDL
 :Class89:
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: EtchedPixels on April 22, 2012, 11:18:58 PM
EWS = Early Warning System.....................or something else ??? :evil:

Engine Wont Start (because the 66's can be a right pita)

Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: kaiwhara on June 07, 2012, 12:04:12 PM
 :smiley-laughing: :smiley-laughing: :smiley-laughing: I like that. I wish I had seen that before I wrote a post on how powerful a REP was to a New Zealand Transport Forum when discussing EMU power output - what with new Spanish Trains a little over a year away..!!

... except on the 4REPs, where it meant Restaurant Extremely Powerful).
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: 4EPB on September 22, 2012, 10:30:27 AM
K was used for side-corridor because C had already been used for "composite"

Hope this helps

JP
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Class 108 on December 30, 2012, 08:00:58 AM
I only became aware this week of TMD's. had to search around to find out it means traction maintenance depot. Ha!

Alan
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: kaiwhara on December 30, 2012, 08:07:56 AM
I only became aware this week of TMD's. had to search around to find out it means traction maintenance depot. Ha!

Alan

Just wait, you ain't seen nothing yet. Wait until I introduce you to the world of T&RSMD's, DMD's DMUD's, EMD's, EMUD's, and all the rest of it!!! :P
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Class 108 on December 30, 2012, 08:21:54 AM
That sounds like a lot of googling!

Alan
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: kaiwhara on December 30, 2012, 08:22:40 AM
That sounds like a lot of googling!

Alan

You could just ask...  ;)
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: scotsoft on December 30, 2012, 12:12:06 PM
That sounds like a lot of googling!

Alan

You could just ask...  ;)

Or you could have given your fingers some exercise  ;)
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Agrippa on December 30, 2012, 04:15:08 PM
Then there is SNCF
                      SNCB
                      OBB
                      SBB
                      DB
                      DBAG
                      FS
                      NS
                      RENFE
                      NICAM....  :D













Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: kaiwhara on December 30, 2012, 07:04:49 PM
Or you could have given your fingers some exercise  ;)

Oh alright Mr Moderator, twist my arm why don't you  ;)

T&RSMD     Traction and Rolling Stock Maintenance Depot
DMD           Diesel Maintenance Depot
DMUD         Diesel Multiple Unit Depot
EMD           Electric Maintenance Depot (unless you are from the States, New Zealand, Australia etc where it stands for Electro Motive Diesel)
EMUD         Electric Multiple Unit Depot

Hope that helps  :read:

Andrew
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Newportnobby on December 30, 2012, 08:30:27 PM
 :o

Think I'll just stay with Wormeries :-X
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Pengi on December 30, 2012, 08:47:38 PM
:o

Think I'll just stay with Wormeries :-X


Didn't know that you now had a Wormery and that you are going to stay with it - that it very good news indeed :bounce:

Here's a link to a web-site for Railway abbreviations etc

http://www.railway-technical.com/LAAR.shtml (http://www.railway-technical.com/LAAR.shtml)
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: CarriageShed on April 23, 2013, 05:34:39 PM
I have a couple more abbreviations to throw at you guys: EVP and MO, both related to freight workings in 1961. Any idea what they mean?

I'm not entirely sure that MO doesn't mean Milk Only, but it would be way too obvious if it did.
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Caz on April 23, 2013, 05:41:11 PM
Got MO on some Fairford Branch working timetables which according to the key is Mondays only.   ;)
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: CarriageShed on April 23, 2013, 05:54:43 PM
Aaaaaah! Now that makes much more sense than Milk Only :-p
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: pape_timmo on April 26, 2013, 02:30:10 AM
I've got my rules soon for work, and the abbreviations for all the isolating cocks and safety systems are something you need to see to believe...

Makes sense when you know them tho...

Cheers, Timmo
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: kaiwhara on April 26, 2013, 09:35:19 AM
I've got my rules soon for work, and the abbreviations for all the isolating cocks and safety systems are something you need to see to believe...

Makes sense when you know them tho...

Cheers, Timmo

Weve got some awesome ones in New Zealand, some I know what they do but no idea what they are called even!

ABV       Automatic Brake Valve
BVCOV  Brake Valve Cut Off Valve
IBV       Indipendant Brake Valve
MU2A   No idea what this is called but it cuts the IBV in and out, and sets the Locomotive Brakes for Lead or Trail
BKS      Battery Knife Switch (yes we do still have these things, and they really do spark away!)
SWA    Safe Working Authority
ASR     Automatic Signalling Rules
DLAS   Double Line Automatic Signalling
SLAS   Single Line Automatic Signalling
CTC     Centralised Traffic Control
TWC    Track Warrant Control

And heaps of others!
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: CarriageShed on April 26, 2013, 10:19:59 AM
I have another one for you from the 1961 timetable for a Bath (Midland) freight service in Somerset: EBV. Could it be empty brake vans...? :-p

EBV - easy, either Early Breakfast Vehicle or egg and bacon van.    ::)   ;)
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Oldman on April 26, 2013, 11:14:30 AM
Guessing on these but possible ???
EVP - Express Van Parcels
EBV - Express Bogie Van
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: CarriageShed on May 11, 2013, 10:42:18 PM
Here are two definites, from a 1950 timetable:

SO = Saturdays only
SX - Saturdays excepted

Still no confirmation on the EVP/EBV, though. I'm guessing a freight timetable (if any such thing exists) would be the best source.
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: dodger on May 12, 2013, 08:13:30 AM
I have another one for you from the 1961 timetable for a Bath (Midland) freight service in Somerset: EBV. Could it be empty brake vans...? :-p

EBV - easy, either Early Breakfast Vehicle or egg and bacon van.    ::)   ;)

In this context the most likely explanation for EBV would be Engine and Brake Van.

Dodger
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: CarriageShed on May 12, 2013, 10:56:23 AM
That makes sense. Just as LE means Light Engine, ie. not hauling anything.
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Jerry Howlett on May 12, 2013, 02:39:49 PM
And these strange things were at least WRITTEN in the working timetable.

As a 16 year old working my first week at the driver/guards booking on point at Swindon the phone rings and a voice says, " I have a wire for you 19:25 Margam tanks cape furno walnut rede".
What the ??? thinks I but politely says thank you and hang up the phone.
I have no idea what I actually put down on paper but it was more akin to send 3 and fourpence were going to a dance!
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: steve836 on November 04, 2013, 08:28:16 PM
Just latched on to this thread- try this for size" cape cicero eltra trials " a telegram I took when I worked in a booking office for B.R. back in the 60's
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Jerry Howlett on November 07, 2013, 02:17:37 PM
My guess is you worked on the midland and they had cancelled one of the early electric test runs.  I was also a booking clerk for xx years at Swindon and then Liverpool Street. My only use of the "wires " ( telegrams ) was on the western region. By 1976 when I moved to Liverpool St I never heard the use of them again.
Jerry
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: steve836 on November 07, 2013, 09:31:01 PM
Well done Jerry
 Very close I actually worked at Shenfield and they  used to run EMU's to Chelmsford & back to check they had put them back together properly.
Steve
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: 1018509 on November 12, 2013, 05:29:51 PM
During my days as a London Underground technician repairing trains the defect log card would often report, from the driver,"OOSNPL & B" to which the sign off reply was usually "NDF".

If this fault occurred often the defect log card would be full of a list of OOSNPL & B NDF.

The fault was Out Of Service No Pilot Light and Bell for which the maintainer had, after test and found all OK, replied No Defect Found
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: mervyn on January 10, 2014, 07:05:03 PM
 You  forgot to mention the Fitters favourite ..FHD for home depot !.... :)
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: pape_timmo on January 10, 2014, 10:04:19 PM
A new one appears in our defect books now, no longer No Fault Found, now it's Contractor Informed...
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: D1042 Western Princess on March 05, 2014, 09:34:15 PM
I have another one for you from the 1961 timetable for a Bath (Midland) freight service in Somerset: EBV. Could it be empty brake vans...? :-p

EBV - easy, either Early Breakfast Vehicle or egg and bacon van.    ::)   ;)

 :bounce: No, Engine and Brake Van.
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: D1042 Western Princess on March 05, 2014, 09:52:18 PM
Diesels aren't really a problem because they're just a number.

Allan

 :hmmm: Unless of course they are Duffs, Hoovers, Doughnuts, Sheds, Rats, Whistlers, Toffee Apples, Peaks, Whizzos, Warships, Hymeks, Sparklers, Skippers, Sprinters, Pacers - anyway, better get back on track (if you'll forgive the pun) before a Moderator tells me I'm off subject! :angel:

Not sure if some of these have been mentioned but these are all abbreviations:
Q  (note in WTT - Runs as required)
CAPED (GWR code for Cancelled As Per Executive Decision)
BRUTE  (BR Utility Trolley)
CWR (Continuously welded rail)
MAS  (Basically colour light signalling)
SPAD (Signal passed at danger)
TSO   (Tourist Second Open)
BSK   (Brake Second Compartment)
FK     (First Compartment)
RB     (Buffet Car)

There are many others but it's late and time for bed! :sleep:
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: zuccah98 on March 05, 2014, 10:21:30 PM
What about "CO" applied on engineers wagons,I was told it meant construction but what does that say about the wagon. Wouldn't all engineers wagons be construction? ??? :confused1:
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: D1042 Western Princess on March 06, 2014, 05:48:27 AM
What about "CO" applied on engineers wagons,I was told it meant construction but what does that say about the wagon. Wouldn't all engineers wagons be construction? ??? :confused1:

In his book on Department Rolling Stock (basically anything to do with track work/engineering) David Larkin tells us that the "O" refers to the braking system (A = Air braked, V = Vacuum braked, O = unfitted, (hand brake fitted only) but gives no clue as to the meaning of "C". He does mention that "Other lettering and sundry coloured symbols" can be found.
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: D1042 Western Princess on March 06, 2014, 08:48:01 PM
Diesels aren't really a problem because they're just a number.

Allan

 :hmmm: Unless of course they are Duffs, Hoovers, Doughnuts, Sheds, Rats, Whistlers, Toffee Apples, Peaks, Whizzos, Warships, Hymeks, Sparklers, Skippers, Sprinters, Pacers - anyway, better get back on track (if you'll forgive the pun) before a Moderator tells me I'm off subject! :angel:



PS. Somehow I forgot Gronk, McDuff (a Duff based in Scotland), Teddy Bear, Sugar Puff and Tractor - I'm sure there are others.
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Plainline. on May 09, 2014, 06:42:22 PM
Back in the eighties I used to work for a sign company. We had a contract to supply BR metal plates with the letters DEP in black on a yellow background. I have seen them attached to overhead masts but I still don't know what the letters mean or stand for.
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: dodger on May 09, 2014, 07:37:18 PM
Back in the eighties I used to work for a sign company. We had a contract to supply BR metal plates with the letters DEP in black on a yellow background. I have seen them attached to overhead masts but I still don't know what the letters mean or stand for.

DEP plates indicated the OHLE structure with Designated Earth Points used to earth the live parts of the overhead line to ground when it was isolated for engineering or any other work that could encroach on the safety clearances.

Dodger
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Jack on March 29, 2015, 07:38:33 PM
Apologises for bringing an old thread back to life but I came across this web page that might be very useful to some newer members. I've bookmarked it.

http://www.scot-rail.co.uk/page/glossary#H (http://www.scot-rail.co.uk/page/glossary#H)
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: 25901JFM on January 31, 2016, 09:50:58 AM
It gets even more mind-numbing with JJA (my autoballasters are called JJA) and TEA (my weathered china clay bullets are called TEA, I think) etc.
I think you'll find they are TIA, TEA are 100tone/102tonne oil tanks. (or a cuppa  :thumbsup:)

TEA is correct for some of the Silver bullets.  The last ones used on the Burngullow - Irvine flow and also on the Quidhampton trips were TEA's numbered NACO 891xx.  I believe these replaced the original ones which were numbered using the international number system not sure of the TOPS code but guessing these were the TIA's.  The Dapol ones I have are numbered using the international numbering system and I guess are models of the original ones that were used on the Irvine trains.

John
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: rogercrossley on January 31, 2016, 11:45:33 AM
I used to ban my people from using abbreviations and acronyms in papers and memos. It's easy to put each into the 'autocorrect' function the first time you use it: thereafter you can type in the acronym but the full version is printed. This way you avoid the use of acronyms as 'jargon', a way of confusing the uninitiated and keeping arcane knowledge secret. Of course, there's a difference between jargon and the legitimate specificity of difficult terminology, but that doesn't justify sprinkling a text with secret acronyms.

Roger
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: BR Signalman on June 08, 2016, 02:56:36 PM
What about "CO" applied on engineers wagons,I was told it meant construction but what does that say about the wagon. Wouldn't all engineers wagons be construction? ??? :confused1:

In his book on Department Rolling Stock (basically anything to do with track work/engineering) David Larkin tells us that the "O" refers to the braking system (A = Air braked, V = Vacuum braked, O = unfitted, (hand brake fitted only) but gives no clue as to the meaning of "C". He does mention that "Other lettering and sundry coloured symbols" can be found.

 The CO in a circle I think you will find, stands for "Construction Only" to ensure it wasn't used for Revenue traffic. As you rightly say, the A,O,V bits are TOPS codes for braking systems placed after the 2 letter wagon description
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: railsquid on December 07, 2016, 03:43:06 PM
I'm cataloguing  my sprawling collection of BR coaches, I have a Farish BG (cat. number 374-042, InterCity livery) bearing the running number 92002 and a code "NEX", what does this mean/stand for? Newspaper EXpress?
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Newportnobby on December 07, 2016, 04:13:28 PM
I also have a Royal Mail BG ex Farish Poole reference 0787 with the running number 92212NEX.
I've tried Googling but been unsuccessful :(
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: mervyn on December 07, 2016, 04:42:55 PM
DEP Means Designated Earth Point as put on overhead masts HTH Mervyn...
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Steven B on December 07, 2016, 05:00:09 PM
I also have a Royal Mail BG ex Farish Poole reference 0787 with the running number 92212NEX.

The NEX part is the TOPS code for a dual braked BG rated at 100mph. 92212 is its unique running number.

The "N" part is used for non-passenger carrying coaching stock. The second letter denotes the sub-type:

NA   Bogie Brake Van 90mph (with gangways)   
NC   Bogie Brake Van 90mph (with shelving for newspapers)         
ND    Bogie Brake Van 90mph (with gangways)   
NE    Bogie Brake Van 100mph (with gangways)
NF   Bogie Brake Van 90mph (no gangways)   
NH   Bogie Brake Van 110mpg (with gangways)   
NJ   General Utility Van 90mph         
NK   General Utility Van  90mph (Modified for Brutes) 90mph      
NL   General Utility Van  90mph (with shelving for newspapers) 90mph
NO   4 wheel Covered Carriage Truck 75mph   
NS   TPO Sorting van
NT   TPO storage van
NQ   Parcels and Miscellaneous van 75mph   
NX   General Utility Van (Motorail)   


The final letter is the brake type:
A = air brake only
V = vacuum brake only
X = dual air & vacuum brakes



Happy modelling.

Steven B.
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: AndyRA on December 07, 2016, 05:02:19 PM
As for NEX the X stands for dual braked (air/vacuum). The N, I think, refers to 'Non-passenger. The second letter I'm not sure of, but generally there were sub division of letters according to the make of van. The E could possibly mean ETH (Electric train heat) fitted?

Andy.
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: D1042 Western Princess on December 07, 2016, 07:38:49 PM
I also have a Royal Mail BG ex Farish Poole reference 0787 with the running number 92212NEX.

The NEX part is the TOPS code for a dual braked BG rated at 100mph. 92212 is its unique running number.

The "N" part is used for non-passenger carrying coaching stock. The second letter denotes the sub-type:

NA   Bogie Brake Van 90mph (with gangways)   
NC   Bogie Brake Van 90mph (with shelving for newspapers)         
ND    Bogie Brake Van 90mph (with gangways)   
NE    Bogie Brake Van 100mph (with gangways)
NF   Bogie Brake Van 90mph (no gangways)   
NH   Bogie Brake Van 110mpg (with gangways)   
NJ   General Utility Van 90mph         
NK   General Utility Van  90mph (Modified for Brutes) 90mph      
NL   General Utility Van  90mph (with shelving for newspapers) 90mph   NO   4 wheel Covered Carriage Truck 75mph   
NS   TPO Sorting van
NT   TPO storage van
NQ   Parcels and Miscellaneous van 75mph   
NX   General Utility Van (Motorail)   


The final letter is the brake type:
A = air brake only
V = vacuum brake only
X = dual air & vacuum brakes



Happy modelling.

Steven B.

Thank you Steven, as it saved my typing finger  from putting all that in myself.
Title: Re: Abbreviations
Post by: Big bad John on December 07, 2016, 08:48:33 PM
Just read the whole of this thread and noted this quote from Newportnobby
Quote
It does make you wonder who came up with the letter K for 'compartment' and 'corridor' ;D
Mind you, it could be the same person who devised the three 'R's' (reading, writing and arithmetic)
At the school I went to the three R's' meant reading writing and rubbing out  :D