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Author Topic: Northallerton  (Read 66286 times)

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Offline Flakmunky

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Re: Northallerton
« Reply #75 on: December 29, 2011, 07:40:59 am »
Hey Kirky,


- if you really want smaller gaps then see if its possible to shim the boards apart by the width of the blade minus the ideal gap, it will close by the thickness of the shim when removed



This is the method I used. My gap is quite small indeed. With my layout the detachable board is a return loop so electrically I need a gap but sometimes it requires a little fine adjustment as if the boards aren't entirely level the gap can close up. To this end I had to file the rails down a little.



Over this joint, my stock bounces less than over my double slip!


Secondly, if we use a small disc, the dremel doesn't6 allow us to get close enough to the board to cut at right angles, and therefore we end up with an angled cut.



I too worried about this but then came to question whether this was / is really a problem? I know aesthetically you might want a square cut, but functionally I couldn't see how it would make any difference and once ballasted would be nigh on invisible. If anything, it might even be better?!
« Last Edit: December 29, 2011, 07:42:46 am by Flakmunky »
If you find a post helpful, thank the poster... Up there to the right of their name! :) ↑↑↑↑↑↑↑

My BR 1980's Layout Thread

Online kirky

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Re: Northallerton
« Reply #76 on: December 30, 2011, 09:12:10 am »

http://www.amazon.com/Dremel-575-Right-Attachment-Rotary/dp/B00005AXI0



Thanks for that Polo, one is now winging its way to Teesside from Amazonland.

Cheers
Kirky
Northallerton is in the August 2018 edition of Raiway Modeller

and in real life at the Normanton and Pontefract exhibition. New College, Park Lane, Pontefract. 26/27th January 2019



Layout: Northallerton: http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=1671.msg16930#msg16930

www.northallertonngauge.co.uk

Cleveland Model Railway club website: www.clevelandmrc.club

Offline polo2k

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Re: Northallerton
« Reply #77 on: December 30, 2011, 06:36:26 pm »
look forward to seeing how you get on :)

Dont forget specs of some kind, the disc will be at an unfamiliar angle so you will be more likely to shatter one or 2
Cheers
-Ash-



The only way to guarantee failure, is not to try

Online kirky

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Re: Northallerton
« Reply #78 on: January 03, 2012, 09:41:52 pm »
Hi guys
A few more photos to share with you all, showing the progress in the fiddle yard.


This is the middle section between the two sets of fiddle yards (on the plan, the red/blue fiddle yard and the pink/green fiddle yard which you can just make out in the corner of the photo, although it is posted earlier in the thread). These points are effectively the entrances/exits to the fiddle yards from the main through centre running lines. 


The next shows the south end curves of the four tracks (there being only two on the upper level at the north end).


The inside radius is about 15 inches. I tried something new when forming these curves and I was wondering what others do. This is what I did: where sections were to be joined on the curve, instead of curving and then cutting to fit the curve, I soldered two lengths of track together before bending. With one end firmly secured, I then bent round the sections of track as if it were one piece. This has the effect of avoiding kinky joins on the curves, but wth the disadvatage of missing a large section of sleepers, as can be seen in the photo. This doesn't matter for the fiddle yard of courrse. Just wondered how others form curves when you need more than one piece of track?

Cheers
kirky
Northallerton is in the August 2018 edition of Raiway Modeller

and in real life at the Normanton and Pontefract exhibition. New College, Park Lane, Pontefract. 26/27th January 2019



Layout: Northallerton: http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=1671.msg16930#msg16930

www.northallertonngauge.co.uk

Cleveland Model Railway club website: www.clevelandmrc.club

Offline Southernboy

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Re: Northallerton
« Reply #79 on: January 03, 2012, 10:07:29 pm »
Hello Kirky,

For joining curved track (or straight to curved) I read about the following method which I've used and am happy with:

Take your two lengths of track.
For one of them cut the rail on one side (say) an inch longer, and the rail on the other side an inch shorter.
For the other section of track do the same, but cut the rails in the opposite fashion to above.
You then thread the two sections of track together.
For one section you're threading the left hand rail through the chairs of the opposite section. And for the other section you're threading the right hand rail through the sleepers of the other section.
You need to cut the sleeper/chair bases accordingly (ie. cut the left and right sections short, and have a middle section of sleepers/chairs to allow you to get the rail-joiners in place) - but when it's all pushed together you don't get any gaps in the sleepers and you do get a robust and reliable curve.

I hope my description makes sense!

Nice work by the way - I am following - just nothing constructive or of interest to add :)
« Last Edit: January 03, 2012, 10:09:58 pm by Southernboy »

Offline Cimmerian

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Re: Northallerton
« Reply #80 on: January 05, 2012, 08:20:16 pm »
The railway is looking really good, however...I am a little concerned about the lack of  :NGF: mug. :)
Regards, Ken

Offline Sprintex

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Re: Northallerton
« Reply #81 on: January 05, 2012, 11:06:07 pm »
For joining curved track (or straight to curved) I read about the following method which I've used and am happy with:

Take your two lengths of track.
For one of them cut the rail on one side (say) an inch longer, and the rail on the other side an inch shorter.
For the other section of track do the same, but cut the rails in the opposite fashion to above.
You then thread the two sections of track together.
For one section you're threading the left hand rail through the chairs of the opposite section. And for the other section you're threading the right hand rail through the sleepers of the other section.
You need to cut the sleeper/chair bases accordingly (ie. cut the left and right sections short, and have a middle section of sleepers/chairs to allow you to get the rail-joiners in place) - but when it's all pushed together you don't get any gaps in the sleepers and you do get a robust and reliable curve.

I hope my description makes sense!

Nice work by the way - I am following - just nothing constructive or of interest to add :)

Not sure that would work with Code 55 track given it is embedded in the plastic base  ;)


Paul

Offline Southernboy

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Re: Northallerton
« Reply #82 on: January 05, 2012, 11:43:37 pm »
Thanks Sprintex,

"  Not sure that would work with Code 55 track given it is embedded in the plastic base  ;)  "

Well it worked for me and others, so I'd be interested to know what you experienced to the contrary?

Maybe there's something I did differently to the way you did it??

Thanks,

Mark
« Last Edit: January 05, 2012, 11:48:35 pm by Southernboy »

Offline Sprintex

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Re: Northallerton
« Reply #83 on: January 07, 2012, 02:37:42 pm »
Wasn't intended as a criticism Mark, just that I'd have thought the rail being embedded into the plastic (as opposed to just retained in chairs like code 80) would have caused a problem getting the adjoining rail threaded in? Obviously not if you have done exactly that, well done  :thumbsup:


Paul

Offline Southernboy

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Re: Northallerton
« Reply #84 on: January 07, 2012, 02:52:18 pm »
Hello Paul,

Sorry, didn't intend my post to sound negative - I was just curious (as always!) - but in retrospect didn't word my reply as well as I could :)


Offline Sprintex

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Re: Northallerton
« Reply #85 on: January 07, 2012, 03:25:10 pm »
LOL, I thought the same about MY post  ;D

Easily done on forums, the way things read to others isn't necessarily the way the poster meant it to sound  ;)


Paul

Online kirky

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Re: Northallerton
« Reply #86 on: January 08, 2012, 05:58:23 pm »
Hi Sprintex and Southernboy

I've had a go at splicing two pieces of track together. here are the photos (new album feature used, so this has an added interest to me at least, to see if they work)

two bits of track, one concrete, one wooden, just to show up the two bits


The next one shows the two bits cut away and the sleepers left in place


And then the pieces pushed together. This is where it is a bit of a disappointment to me, or I have not done it correctly. Whichever way I tried to bend the two bits together,I end up with an unacceptable gap, but also with a kink, which I didn't get with the soldered rails method. I must be doing something wrong, maybe not enough sleepers shared between the two pieces?


Any further thoughts anyone??

Kirky

Northallerton is in the August 2018 edition of Raiway Modeller

and in real life at the Normanton and Pontefract exhibition. New College, Park Lane, Pontefract. 26/27th January 2019



Layout: Northallerton: http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=1671.msg16930#msg16930

www.northallertonngauge.co.uk

Cleveland Model Railway club website: www.clevelandmrc.club

Offline Bikeracer

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Re: Northallerton
« Reply #87 on: January 08, 2012, 06:44:36 pm »
I think your result is inevitable just relying on the fishplates to keep it all lined up,what was wrong with soldering the fishplates on like you were doing ?

If you turn the track over and cut the plastic out that separates the sleepers every two or three sleepers a couple of times each side of the join,you can slide the blocks of sleepers away from the joint,make the joint and then slide the sleepers back again.

I soldered one of my curves direct onto the toe of a turnout so the curve would make a smooth entry.

Allan
« Last Edit: January 08, 2012, 06:54:22 pm by Bikeracer »
I'm not a complete idiot..some bits are missing.

Offline Southernboy

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Re: Northallerton
« Reply #88 on: January 08, 2012, 07:38:37 pm »
That's strange, it worked ok for me.

Having said that, I'd usually have the track held to the shape of the curve I want with pins or screws (and then when happy with alignment, glue it down, keeping the pins/screws in place until the glue was dry).

If you just bend Code 55 Flexitrack by hand, it is better at holding the curve you want than code 80, but still has a small degree of 'spring-back' - at least in my experience.

One other thing. Did you know you're only supposed to bend Flexitrack in one direction? Underneath the track, there's an occasional small arrow, and you're supposed to bend the track in that direction only. I had some problems with track 'arching' into the air when I tried to bend it - and after days of head-scratching, came across that answer by total coincidence. I'm not saying that's what's happening here - just thought I'd drop it into the equation.


Online Mustermark

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Re: Northallerton
« Reply #89 on: January 08, 2012, 08:43:15 pm »
One other thing. Did you know you're only supposed to bend Flexitrack in one direction? Underneath the track, there's an occasional small arrow, and you're supposed to bend the track in that direction only.

I did not know that!  I haven't actually noticed a problem but that is a very useful tip for future track laying... :thumbsup:

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