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Author Topic: 3D Printing  (Read 10817 times)

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Offline Stevie DC

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3D Printing
« on: April 30, 2011, 07:52:47 PM »
Hi all, first post here, although I recognise some of you here from 'the other forums'!  :evil: :smiley-laughing:

Anyway, I've been playing around with CAD and 3D printing for awhile now and would like to share some of my current projects. The designs are currently waiting to be printed by Shapeways in a new ultra fine detail they are testing.

First is a K3 body to convert a Farish V2 chassis. This will be the second one of these I've had printed, the first being in wax which then got investment cast - the caster placed sprues on the external detail!!!  :thumbsdown:  Hopefully this version will be usable! The Farish chassis has a slightly incorrect driving wheel spacing as well as the wheels being a little large (oversized driving wheels on an n gauge loco!!!!) but has the correct valve gear, etc so for me its a better option than say a Crab.



Next is a Dia. 120 Passenger Break Van (Pigeon Van). I'm really going to try and push the boat out here with vac cylinder, buffers, NEM pockets, and printed pinpoint axle bearings! Still needs brakes adding but excitement got the better of me!



Slightly more mundane is a Gresley standard 8'6 bogie.



Finally, trying to push the new material option to the limit is this mock up of a lattice signal post - the cross pieces of the lattice are only 0.3mm thick!



I hope that you guys (and girls!) find these of interest, I'll post some pictures when I get the prints (in a couple of weeks hopefully!).

Cheers for looking

Steve

Offline jonclox

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Re: 3D Printing
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2011, 08:18:38 PM »
Well welcome to our corner of the www :wave:
I dont do other forums so we are new to eachother :smiley-laughing:
Ive always loved the idea of CAD but never been able to afford the software or have the time to learn how to use it, so I shall be intersted in you results just to see haw far it can be taken
John A GOM personified
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Offline Tank

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Re: 3D Printing
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2011, 09:39:51 PM »
Very good work. :thumbsup:  CAD is very time consuming, but the results are stunning.

Offline painbrook

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Re: 3D Printing
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2011, 12:31:19 PM »
Hi Chris ,  :wave: , is this a hobby or do you make kits ? . Excuse my ignorance . Cheers John .

Offline Truffles

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Re: 3D Printing
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2011, 02:19:47 PM »
Very interesting and great CAD work.

From what I have seen of 3D printing it still has quite away to go to get a smooth finish, so will look forward to seeing the results of the ultra fine material but I will be surprised if it is able to give a good rendition of the loco boiler. Have you considered approaching the guys at Renedra who have a very good reputation for injection moulding:

http://renedra.co.uk/

Offline Stevie DC

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Re: 3D Printing
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2011, 09:23:50 PM »
Hi all and thanks for the positive comments!  ;D

Jon and Tank, yes CAD did take a little while to master as with most things its about finding out what programs and techniques work for you.

John, I've thought about making kits before but not yet done anything. At the moment this is a hobby but if that changes I'll asked Tank if I can put up a shameless plug here...  :smiley-laughing:

Truffles with 3D printing it really is a case of you get what you pay for there are some processes out there that really do deliver - for a price. You are right that most bottom end printing processes cannot capture the shape of a boiler very well but this seems to be improving. I've recently had some SLA (laser cured resin) models made with a layer depth of 0.2mm this doesn't work well with the boiler but some rubbing down did cure this to an extent. I've got a couple of pictures, the first is of the K3 which was printed in wax (at 4000dpi!) and case in brass - this was going to be a kit but unfortunately I'd made a mistake in the design which couldn't be made good without affecting the quality of the master  :'(



The second is of an GNR (LNER) Atlantic which was printed using 0.2mm SLA and rubbed down. Hopefully Shapeways new material with it's 0.032mm build depth will provide a better (most cost effective) result.



Finally, I've been on holiday to Pickering this week. I took the laptop and after around 5-6 hours had this to show...



Hopefully I'll have my first set of prints from Shapeways sometime within the next 10 days... demand for this new material exceeded their expectations and they've got some delays as a result...

Offline painbrook

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Re: 3D Printing
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2011, 12:37:57 PM »
great stuff , you might be the man with my unrebuilt 'patriot'  : ;D , cheers john .

Offline Stevie DC

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Re: 3D Printing
« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2011, 05:52:38 PM »
great stuff , you might be the man with my unrebuilt 'patriot'  : ;D , cheers john .

Unrebuilt Patriot, not being an LMS man I had to remind myself what one looked like - about how I remembered actually!!!  8)

The Jubilee or Royal Scot from Farish would seem to be a good choice for a chassis but what about the tender? The new Farish models use a tender drive which seems to have a very different wheelbase to the Patriot. Would people be prepared to accept and slightly overlong tender here?

Offline Southernboy

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Re: 3D Printing
« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2011, 11:27:42 PM »
Hello Atso,

I'm quite interested in this 3D malarky - the potential is quite exciting, but I don't know much about it.

Could you do a quick 'idiot's quide' to the basic steps involved please? And what sort of prices are we looking at?

For me I'm thinking of things like pre-war double-deck London buses which nobody makes in any shape or form and would be time consuming and flimsy if made in Plasticard, and equally time consuming but more expensive if I got someone to make an etch for me.

Thanks

 

Offline NTrain

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Re: 3D Printing
« Reply #9 on: May 09, 2011, 12:01:19 AM »
First step is to draw up your model in a CAD package.
Then you eport it as an STL file.
Use a package like Netfab to check that the file has no 'holes', multiple shells, etc
Upload the file to an agency like Shapeways.

A bus model that I tried out cost about 9 and that was just the basic body, no floor, seats  etc
The material was 'White Strong & Flexible' which has a slightly rough finish and can be subject to layering.

New material 'Frosted Ultra Detail' would cost about 21 and is supposed to have a much better finish. I am awaiting my 'test' components, so I cannot say how good the new material is yet. I am due my parts fairly soon.

Offline Stevie DC

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Re: 3D Printing
« Reply #10 on: May 09, 2011, 12:38:43 AM »
Hi Southern Boy,

Bob (NTrain) has pretty muched sumed up the process. However be warned that learning a CAD package is a real learning curve, you should be able to pick up the basics quite easily but figuring out those hard to model areas can take some time.

Bob, having read the spec for the Frosted Ultra Detail it compares quite well against my Solid Scape model (the K3 pictured previously) with a similar layer depth. To be honest 800dpi resolution works nicely for printing photos so I'm hopeful that this will at least meet some of my expectations without the costly investment casting of a wax print! Looking forward to hearing about your opinions on Shapeway's newest material in due course!

Offline Southernboy

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Re: 3D Printing
« Reply #11 on: May 09, 2011, 07:27:13 PM »
Thanks for your very helpful replies NTrain and Atso, I'll be keeping an eye on this thread to see how projects develop.

I'll probably be ok at getting the basics of CAD as I work in design (2D) and have a basic grasp of illustrative / layout programmes, but as you say, figuring out more complex shapes/angles and curves (especially those that intersect) will be a bit of a learning curve.

To be honest 21.00 sounds reasonable for a basic shell - an etch would cost at least 10.00+, still requires assembly and also wouldn't necessarily come with parts like seats and wheels.

Don't hold your breath on me making a bus (or similar) just yet - I'm just gathering thoughts and information at the moment.

Thanks again!


Offline NTrain

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Re: 3D Printing
« Reply #12 on: May 09, 2011, 08:36:15 PM »
I haven't worked out the method of adding pictures to posts yet, or I would put up a picture of my bendy bus.

What type of buses are you looking at anyway.

Shapeways have just anounced a 'White Strong & Flexible... Polished and Smooth'. Just ordered some samples to compare.

I have been designing stuff in Rhino 3D, which is a high power package. After 5+ years, there are still some areas I am having difficulties with.

Offline NTrain

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Re: 3D Printing
« Reply #13 on: May 09, 2011, 09:01:39 PM »



Offline Southernboy

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Re: 3D Printing
« Reply #14 on: May 09, 2011, 09:09:08 PM »
Your pictures just popped up as I was writing this - they look good  :)

The sort of bus I'm thingking of is the London NS type:

http://www.doubledecker-bus.com/2009/11/ns-type/

Both open and closed-top versions.
They were fairly common from the mid 1920s to late 1930s, although having said that until 1933 and the formation of LPTB bus companies in London were still privately run so a variety of types of bus in different liveries would be seen on the streets. It's one of the aspects of London I'd like to capture on my layout.

 

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