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Author Topic: Chetcombe - West Dorset in the late 1960s and early 1970s  (Read 101255 times)

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Offline BernardTPM

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Re: Chetcombe - West Dorset in the late 1960s and early 1070s
« Reply #15 on: August 03, 2012, 10:49:19 PM »
For your period, it would be a nice touch to put a few maroon coaches into your blue/grey rakes. Not many, maybe one or two in each. You could random shift them round between trains to make it look like you've got more rakes of coaches than you actually have!  ;D

Offline Chetcombe

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Re: Chetcombe - West Dorset in the late 1960s and early 1070s
« Reply #16 on: August 03, 2012, 11:05:48 PM »
Thanks for the comments on the Mk1 coach rakes, I have tried to be as accurate as possible and it is nice to be able to run 9 coach rakes on the main line (the reason I love N Gauge!!).

For the longest time I struggled to find any good information on the web about short to medium formations of Mk1s. But over the course of time I have put together a reasonable list of 'actual' formations used on BR Western Region and on Inter Regional cross country trains typical of the South West. I have lists now of anything from 3 to 10 coach formations. The new Farish Mk1s allow pretty much any formation to be made, particularly now they have released the Blue Riband GUVs and BGs. If anybody would like me to share these, let me know.

I agree with BernardTPM that there were often 'mixed'  rakes in existence in the 60s/70s - maroon and B/G and even the chocolate & cream used on Western Region 'named' trains. I actually have a couple of other rakes where I have done this - one behind a green Hymek and the other behind another maroon Warship. I love the combination of the maroon Warships with Blue/Grey coaches and this was not an uncommon site towards the end of the life of the Warships in the early 70s. I also have an all maroon rake, which looks fabulous.

Where I am struggling is how to integrate the SR green Mk1s. I have not seen photos of them jumbled up with maroon or even B/G coaches. Any suggestions welcome!

Mike

Offline tim-pelican

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Re: Chetcombe - West Dorset in the late 1960s and early 1070s
« Reply #17 on: August 03, 2012, 11:13:19 PM »
Love the sweeping curves, all looks very realistic - great job!

Offline Donkey

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Re: Chetcombe - West Dorset in the late 1960s and early 1070s
« Reply #18 on: August 03, 2012, 11:55:30 PM »
Fantastic looking layout Mike :thumbsup: Thanks for sharing with us. I like your choice of era and location as I enjoyed a few spotting trips to the western region in my yoof. The hydraulics never failed to impress me and my pals  :) Please keep the updates and  :camera: coming.

Marty

Offline Dock Shunter

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Re: Chetcombe - West Dorset in the late 1960s and early 1070s
« Reply #19 on: August 04, 2012, 12:07:07 AM »
Fantastic looking layout, love the video, I'm sure your father would be very proud  :thumbsup:

And i echo the very same sentiments..... :thumbsup:

Offline EtchedPixels

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Re: Chetcombe - West Dorset in the late 1960s and early 1070s
« Reply #20 on: August 04, 2012, 12:14:17 AM »
Thanks for the comments on the Mk1 coach rakes, I have tried to be as accurate as possible and it is nice to be able to run 9 coach rakes on the main line (the reason I love N Gauge!!).

Real Warships were normally limited to 8 (less over some routes).

Quote
Where I am struggling is how to integrate the SR green Mk1s. I have not seen photos of them jumbled up with maroon or even B/G coaches. Any suggestions welcome!

These would have been inter-regional trains using Southern Region stock. In most cases in that period they would have been entirely green stock. When the regions got the ability to use their own liveries again only the Western and Southern bothered. The Western tarted up a few named trains but the Southern repainted everything they could back to green, except stuff they'd managed to keep green all along despite the rules (by revarnishing, patching etc) 8)

Alan
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Offline Mustermark

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Re: Chetcombe - West Dorset in the late 1960s and early 1070s
« Reply #21 on: August 04, 2012, 12:32:22 AM »
That is a fantastic lookimg layout.  Very atmospheric too.  I am sure your dad would be proud. :thumbsup:

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I'm a personality prototype... you can tell, can't you.

Offline Chetcombe

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Re: Chetcombe - West Dorset in the late 1960s and early 1070s
« Reply #22 on: August 04, 2012, 12:34:49 AM »
Thanks "Etchedpixels"- saves me some money if I don't have to change those 5 SR green MK1s (BSK, SK, SK, FK, BSK if anyone is interested!). To change it up a little I am thinking of upgrading the old Farish (non Blue Riband) FK to one of the Maunsell variety when they come out - I assume these would still have been around in my era?

I will keep the Warships to 8 coaches max and only use 9 behind a 47, a Peak or double headed Hymeks. Still waiting on those Dapol Westerns...

Thanks again

Mike

Offline BernardTPM

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Re: Chetcombe - West Dorset in the late 1960s and early 1070s
« Reply #23 on: August 04, 2012, 08:48:45 AM »
To change it up a little I am thinking of upgrading the old Farish (non Blue Riband) FK to one of the Maunsell variety when they come out - I assume these would still have been around in my era?
Bullied coaches were in normal passenger service until the late 1960s, but Maunsells were withdrawn in the early '60s. Many were transferred to Departmental use, often lasting well into the 1980s.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2013, 10:26:42 PM by BernardTPM »

Offline Jerry Howlett

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Re: Chetcombe - West Dorset in the late 1960s and early 1070s
« Reply #24 on: August 04, 2012, 01:11:15 PM »
That does it >:( There are getting to be far too many good layouts on the forum.
I might just as well pack in this modelling malarkey and take up knitting ::)

I hear Mrs trellis runs a class on a Thursday night after closing time.

However to Mike "Chetcombe" once again the green veil of envy descends on me. My excuse is its too hot here to get on with any proper modelling !. Must continue after the grandkids have left week after next.

Great layout I remember the warships et al running into Waterloo and fully support any excuse to run bullied coaches.
Jerry
Some days its just not worth gnawing through the straps.

Offline EtchedPixels

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Re: Chetcombe - West Dorset in the late 1960s and early 1070s
« Reply #25 on: August 04, 2012, 01:14:53 PM »
Thanks "Etchedpixels"- saves me some money if I don't have to change those 5 SR green MK1s (BSK, SK, SK, FK, BSK if anyone is interested!). To change it up a little I am thinking of upgrading the old Farish (non Blue Riband) FK to one of the Maunsell variety when they come out - I assume these would still have been around in my era?

Not entirely sure.. The Bulleid stock hung on until 1967/8 or so before it basically all fell apart. Maunsells I believe were 1966 or so although this would have been the last few hangers on in both cases. I associate the Bulleids with Warships more than Maunsells it must be said.

(some Maunsell stock has now done forty years in preserved service... longer than the Southern railway existed and now at the point we are talking coaches that will have served half their lives preserved!)

Cometmodels.co.uk has a nice data sheet on the Bulleid formations...




"Knowledge has no value or use for the solitary owner: to be enjoyed it must be communicated" -- Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden

Offline BernardTPM

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Re: Chetcombe - West Dorset in the late 1960s and early 1070s
« Reply #26 on: August 04, 2012, 02:03:00 PM »
'Maunsell coaches' is a bit like 'Collett coaches', covering quite a few different styles. Some late Maunsell coaches had windows like 2-BILs for example, but those aren't the type intended by Dapol.

Offline Chetcombe

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Re: Chetcombe - West Dorset in the late 1960s and early 1070s
« Reply #27 on: August 05, 2012, 10:54:33 PM »
Firstly, many thanks to all who have taken the interest to look at my layout; in particular to those that have taken the time to comment and make suggestions. I am amazed that the video I posted has had over a hundred views on YouTube in just a couple of days!

So this has inspired me to provide some more details about how I started the layout. I have dug back through the photos I have taken during construction to show how things initially progressed...

One of the easiest decisions was the location. We have a house in North East Pennsylvania where we spend a lot of weekends. In the garage there is a small alcove about 9' x 6' that we had added as an extra storage area when we remodeled the house. Actually I should acknowledge my father's role in creating this space. He had staked out the house plan and we had decided that a little extra garage space would be useful; in fact when it was built I remember us both joking that it would be a good space for a layout...

The first step was to clear out the space in the garage and I immediately hit a snag. As soon as I switched the light on to start clearing the space I spotted an ominous looking damp patch in the ceiling. A clear sign that there was a problem with the flat roof beneath the deck above - needless to say, this was a problem that took a few months and quite a large check to solve... I won't bore you with the details, but I did take advantage of having the builders in by speccing out some cabinets, a baseboard, shelving and lighting as part of the repairs. That should help my complete absence of carpentry skills (or so I thought). Anyway, thanks to the contractor for a nice job - as the former owner of an OO scale layout, Craig got the idea very quickly! The concept of putting the baseboard above cabinets we thought was great, but as I was to find out later, it makes affixing wiring, point motors etc under the baseboard almost impossible...



Then came transferring the track plan onto the baseboard. It was immediately clear that I had been way too ambitious - everything I wanted to build took far too much space. I wanted to have a double track mainline in a continuous loop with a station and a single track branch line also running in a continuous loop from the main station via a smaller branch station. This would all fit, but without most of the storage sidings, bay platforms etc I wanted to include. I had considered adding a fiddle yard as 'phase 2' but it was clear that the only solution was to include this from the getgo. So out came the toolbox and I constructed a regular baseboard (10ft by 2 ft) which connected with the existing baseboard. Not the best carpentry in the world, but sturdy at least!



Next step was to decide what type of wood to choose for the baseboard. I didn't fancy plywood (too hard to push track pins into) and it soon became clear that Sundeala board is a British product that is not available in the states. Eventually I was able to find a product called Homasote board - similar to Sundeala but a little softer. Temperatures in this part of Pennsylvania can be extreme -18C is not uncommon in the winter up to 35C in the summer. So far it has been up to the job.



Next came the track. I have to say I was very trepidatious about my ability to lay flex track. So for the fiddle yard and hidden tracks I decided to use Kato Unitrak and defer choice of track for the scenic section to a later date. I also felt that the Kato points with their built in motors would be a very simple solution as I wanted the fiddle yard to have point motors. The wiring was pretty straightforward - I fixed a Kato powerpack under the baseboard and built a bank of switches. I had decided on DCC vs DC in the planning stage and had already installed a DCC Bus. With the benefit of hindsight I should have considered where the points would be before placing the bus wires - everything congregated in the same tight area



I managed to fit in 5 tracks for each side of the 2 track mainline in the fiddle yard. Here is a view from the other end, you can also see the double track mainline leaving the fiddle yard and climbing a Woodland Scenics 2% incline against the window and back wall.



I am not certain I would use Unitrak again if I was starting over. Not only have I developed track laying skills and prefer the look and performance of Peco track, but the distance between the tracks in the fiddle yard is generous to say the least because of the geometry of the Kato system. Good for placing rolling stock onto the rails, but an inefficient use of space. So a future job may well be to upgrade to Peco track (including 3 way points) in the fiddle yard.

I hope you find my experiences valuable. If so I will continue to post updates.

Mike




« Last Edit: June 26, 2013, 01:58:50 AM by Chetcombe »

Offline Tank

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Re: Chetcombe - West Dorset in the late 1960s and early 1070s
« Reply #28 on: August 05, 2012, 11:02:50 PM »
Really wonderful!  A great space you have. :)

Offline davieb

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Re: Chetcombe - West Dorset in the late 1960s and early 1070s
« Reply #29 on: August 05, 2012, 11:08:07 PM »
WOW mike  :goggleeyes:

wish i had that much space to use   :drool:  :envy:

guess for now i will have to stick to 8ft x 3ft  :doh:

can't wait to see your layout progress

dave  :thumbsup:

 

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