!!

Not Registered?

Welcome!  Please register to view all of the new posts and forum boards - some of which are hidden to guests.  After registering and gaining 10 posts you will be able to sell and buy items on our N'porium.

If you have any problems registering, then please check your spam filter before emailing us.  Hotmail users seem to find their emails in the Junk folder.


Thanks for reading,
The NGF Staff.

Author Topic: Scalescenes Window Sills  (Read 444 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline tmark

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 22
    • Awards
Scalescenes Window Sills
« on: March 24, 2020, 08:55:50 PM »
I like SS buildings and try to build them as much as I can. Yet I can never get the window sills to look good. So, I thought I would ask you all how you handle these tiny pieces on "print only" paper. Perhaps you use a heavier gauge paper for those small, delicate parts.  Or do you just leave them off. Thanks, Mark

Offline EtchedPixels

  • Advertiser
  • Trade Count: (+44)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 16353
  • 2mm Association Number: 4412
  • Posts: 8388
  • Country: wales
  • Gender: Male
    • Ebay
    • Google+
    • Twitter
    • YouTube
    • Etched Pixels
    • Awards
Re: Scalescenes Window Sills
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2020, 09:13:52 PM »
I tend to ignore the bits that are too fiddy or do them my own way. You can make fine windowsills with the tiny plastic strip/rods from evergreen and similar ranges and just cut lengths with a knife, paint of needed and glue on with a clear setting glue. They also have more depth that way.
"Knowledge has no value or use for the solitary owner: to be enjoyed it must be communicated" -- Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden

Online Bealman

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23151
  • Posts: 19596
  • Country: au
  • Gender: Male
  • Promotion remains in the future
    • Awards
Re: Scalescenes Window Sills
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2020, 09:27:20 PM »
Yes, easier just to make your own. A strip of card, or, as EP suggests, plasticard.
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline Dorsetmike

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 2365
  • Posts: 3841
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • Grumpy old fart
    • Skype
    • Awards
Re: Scalescenes Window Sills
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2020, 09:28:57 PM »
I tend to ignore the bits that are too fiddy or do them my own way. You can make fine windowsills with the tiny plastic strip/rods from evergreen and similar ranges and just cut lengths with a knife, paint of needed and glue on with a clear setting glue. They also have more depth that way.

Wot he said, plastic strip, can also do the same for some lintels.

Not the best example but you get the idea
Cheers MIKE
(Sorry, but you are not allowed to access the gallery)


How many roads must a man walk down ... ... ... ... ... before he knows he's lost!

Offline exmouthcraig

  • Larger Gallery
  • Trade Count: (+7)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1804
    • Awards
Re: Scalescenes Window Sills
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2020, 09:39:22 PM »
Definitely plastruct rod like everyone else.

Just a note about lintels Mike, it is quite rare that a lintel will protrude the face of the brickwork, not impossible, but the problem it causes is the water will run down the face of the brick and then have a very nice ledge to sit on and then track back to the face work and penetrate the building on the mortar joint.

A shaped keystone in a lintel will most always be proud of the face work, they will always be wedge shaped so water will track down and drip rather than track inside.



Note the top edge of the keystone is chamfered, this will allow any water running down the face to be shed over the edge before it sits and penetrates the brick joint.

Online Bealman

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23151
  • Posts: 19596
  • Country: au
  • Gender: Male
  • Promotion remains in the future
    • Awards
Re: Scalescenes Window Sills
« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2020, 09:43:38 PM »
I've never given it much thought. Most informative.

Thanks for posting!  :thumbsup:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline Dorsetmike

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 2365
  • Posts: 3841
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • Grumpy old fart
    • Skype
    • Awards
Re: Scalescenes Window Sills
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2020, 10:02:37 PM »
Good point @exmouthcraig, I have gone over to using a thin paper lintel, when I print textures to A4 labels I get quite a bit of thin sticky white paper from the edges which I then paint in a stone or cement colour.
Cheers MIKE
(Sorry, but you are not allowed to access the gallery)


How many roads must a man walk down ... ... ... ... ... before he knows he's lost!

Offline tmark

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 22
    • Awards
Re: Scalescenes Window Sills
« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2020, 12:13:56 AM »
Oh man these are some great ideas and I can't wait to try them. Thanks alot for all you said, Mark

Offline Newportnobby

  • Global Moderator
  • Trade Count: (+98)
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 21962
  • Posts: 34976
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Scalescenes Window Sills
« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2020, 08:36:46 AM »
@exmouthcraig
Having only ever known a 'keystone' as a vintage copper thanks for educating me. I now know something I didn't before.

Offline exmouthcraig

  • Larger Gallery
  • Trade Count: (+7)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1804
    • Awards
Re: Scalescenes Window Sills
« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2020, 09:26:02 AM »
@Newportnobby, I do try to bring some useful information to the masses  :-[

The keystone is shaped to allow the compression of the building outwards to the supporting pillars and/or brickwork to allow the opening to stay square and open once the window is removed. Its shape allows as much pressure as possible to be exerted but it can never push through the gap as the head is so much wider then the foot!!

(I'm sure theres a more technical way to tell you this, but I am nothing more then a simple lay man  :-\)

Openings can also be built with stone cills, mullions (vertical stone pillars, usually decoratively carved) and a window header. The mullions provide the support and very common in stately homes and churches.

Online Bealman

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23151
  • Posts: 19596
  • Country: au
  • Gender: Male
  • Promotion remains in the future
    • Awards
Re: Scalescenes Window Sills
« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2020, 10:15:50 AM »
Layman perhaps, but you've got the terminology off pat!  :thumbsup:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline Markthetog

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 28963
  • Posts: 17
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Scalescenes Window Sills
« Reply #11 on: March 31, 2020, 09:57:31 AM »
I find the sills that one cuts out and fold over the sill work well with self adhesive paper and are quite easy to get straight if you lay it flat across the sill, rub into place with a nail then fold down. The sills that one is supposed to stick to card i find often too deep so i use a strip of self adhesive paper printed with sills from a Scalescenes scratchbuilders sheet folded over a sheet of ordinary 80gsm paper. Trim the entire strip to the required depth and simply cut off the width required.

Offline tmark

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 22
    • Awards
Re: Scalescenes Window Sills
« Reply #12 on: March 31, 2020, 12:48:25 PM »
After reading and trying some of the ideas I found one I thought of and seem to like also. I took a strip of #292 Evergreen angle styrene and cut one edge appx. in half. Very tedious. Then cut to length for outside the window and cut back the half wide edge to fit inside the window opening.  Your left with one piece to deal with and sometimes you can get the slight angle downward coming out of the window. Thanks for all the ideas, Mark

Offline Dorsetmike

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 2365
  • Posts: 3841
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • Grumpy old fart
    • Skype
    • Awards
Re: Scalescenes Window Sills
« Reply #13 on: March 31, 2020, 01:40:50 PM »
I've used a similar idea over doors, not quite a porch, more a primitive keep some rain off, but can also be used as he roof of a porch, instead of cutting the door opening fuly just make a T cut, fold out the sides and add the angle plastic porch "roof"

Here's a prototype for you, RAF Married quarters (lived in a few of them over the years!)


Cheers MIKE
(Sorry, but you are not allowed to access the gallery)


How many roads must a man walk down ... ... ... ... ... before he knows he's lost!

 

Please Support Us!
July Goal: £60.00
Due Date: Jul 31
Total Receipts: £35.00
Below Goal: £25.00
Site Currency: GBP
58% 
July Donations

SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal