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Author Topic: Humbledon  (Read 7028 times)

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Online degsy_safc

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Re: Baseboard Surface
« Reply #45 on: February 25, 2020, 11:36:22 AM »
I love L shaped layouts, but my question is, why three loops?
Most main lines are two tracks.

Agree George @Bealman, but I was thinking 2 main line and the 1 for branch / freight. Thinking about the east coast mainline there are numerous sections which are 4 track 2 up & 2 down with the outer 2 tracks being slow and the inner 2 being the fast passenger services.

Open to suggestions, but would like to have a few trains continuously running with passing places so it looks like trains set off and it takes a while before they come back. I'd also like something to play about with such as small sidings / goods, parcels to keep the interest in operations.

Hope this makes sense..

Cheers Derek
Cheers Derek

Offline jpendle

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Re: Baseboard Surface
« Reply #46 on: February 25, 2020, 02:21:02 PM »
Hi,

So these are my thoughts.

First if you consider the green line the branch then why not terminate it to a dead end station at the bottom of the 'L', in the middle of the loop.
Second the mainline station has too many platforms.
If Blue & Yellow are the mainline then get rid of platforms 2 & 4, you then have 2 'fast' through lines, with stopping trains using platforms 1 & 3.
Get rid of the passing loop on the green line, platform 4 is gone, and the green line can use platform 3.
Next rethink the 3 crossings from yellow to green. Instead have a crossing from Blue to Yellow to Green near the station to allow mainline trains to access the branch.
Don't forget that trains need to come off the mainline to get to the branch unless you run just a simple passenger shuttle service.

BTW take a look at the layout at Bolton Trinity street and Wigan Northwestern, might not be in the right geography, but give a good flavour of a medium sized mainline station, as opposed to Preston or Crewe.

Regards,

John P
Check out my layout thread.

Contemporary NW (Wigan Wallgate and North Western)

https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=39501.msg476247#msg476247

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Re: Baseboard Surface
« Reply #47 on: February 25, 2020, 04:29:35 PM »
These days I rarely use point motors, I much prefer wire in tube, much cheaper and no motors to burn out. Easy to operate two points e.g crossovers, from one wire using cranks. My baseboards are 4'x2'x2" foam insulation boards with a covering of cork floooring tiles, cut a channel in the cork to run the wire in tube, cover with filler, then scenic scatter, road surface or paving etc.
Cheers MIKE
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Re: Baseboard Surface
« Reply #48 on: February 25, 2020, 04:55:18 PM »
First if you consider the green line the branch then why not terminate it to a dead end station at the bottom of the 'L', in the middle of the loop.
Hi John,
Firstly many thanks for the feedback..

With ref the colours - I was thinking yellow and green for the mainline, blue for branch - but in reality it doesn't matter the same comment can apply to blue as easily as green.
While I was in my loft messing with baseboards this afternoon I did think of something very similar. I thought of getting rid of the 3 track elevation and just elevating the branch to a terminus station but with 2 platforms to allow 2 trains to run backwards / forwards, that would allow me to hide the mainline and let them exit / enter a tunnel at the bottom of the 'L' loop, I'd lose the points in that hidden section too.   

Second the mainline station has too many platforms.
If Blue & Yellow are the mainline then get rid of platforms 2 & 4, you then have 2 'fast' through lines, with stopping trains using platforms 1 & 3.
Get rid of the passing loop on the green line, platform 4 is gone, and the green line can use platform 3.

Yes I see what you're suggesting, my only reason for the number of passing loops was to be able to park one train on each loop to allow 6 trains to run, but by getting rid of some platforms will condense the station leaving a bit room behind for something else. I didn't think there was much scope for a fiddle yard in its current format, however if I could incorporate some sidings somewhere for a little bit of shunting / area to 'park' a couple of trains then I'd still be able to bring different locos into play. It doesn't make much difference at this moment in time as I only have 3 separate locos and hardly any wagons / coaches. But that will be a gradual build up over time.

Ive assumed platform widths of 2" which equates to just over 24 feet at 1:148 scale - is that a good rule of thumb or should I go smaller / larger?

Next rethink the 3 crossings from yellow to green. Instead have a crossing from Blue to Yellow to Green near the station to allow mainline trains to access the branch.
Don't forget that trains need to come off the mainline to get to the branch unless you run just a simple passenger shuttle service.
Will rethink point work for crossings, I assume if I apply a crossing to get from mainline to branch then I'd also need the opposite to get back? This is one aspect where im struggling to be fair, I've googled quite a lot of east coast mainline station photos and apart from the very small ones point work is very complex, don't get me wrong, I don't want three tracks that are not connected, its just the best placement for the crossings that would allow sidings for example to also be installed. Hope that makes sense?

BTW take a look at the layout at Bolton Trinity street and Wigan Northwestern, might not be in the right geography, but give a good flavour of a medium sized mainline station, as opposed to Preston or Crewe.

I'll have a look at those shortly..

Once again many thanks for taking the time to comment / offer advice, its much appreciated.

Cheers Derek
Cheers Derek

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Re: Baseboard Surface
« Reply #49 on: February 26, 2020, 02:36:34 PM »
Hi,

You would still have two loops and be able to run 5 trains, as the only loop going away would be on the branch line.

Prototypically, a branch wouldn't leave the main line and then rejoin somewhere else, it would normally be a dead end or be joined up to some other line, so for a single track branch trains would come off and on the main at the same place. You would need somewhere to have engines run round on the branch though.

Regards,

John P
Check out my layout thread.

Contemporary NW (Wigan Wallgate and North Western)

https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=39501.msg476247#msg476247

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Re: Baseboard Surface
« Reply #50 on: February 26, 2020, 08:09:21 PM »
You would still have two loops and be able to run 5 trains, as the only loop going away would be on the branch line.
Prototypically, a branch wouldn't leave the main line and then rejoin somewhere else, it would normally be a dead end or be joined up to some other line, so for a single track branch trains would come off and on the main at the same place.

Ok that makes sense, will look at a junction from main to branch at some point on the loop, maybe just outside of the main station

You would need somewhere to have engines run round on the branch though.

Sorry John, don't understand what you mean here 'run round' do you mean run up to station then pass a point, reverse drive back down another track to another point and then back up to the carriages in the station? Or are you thinking a loop that goes back onto the branch - where you need to have track isolators and a polarity switching device?

Many thanks Derek
Cheers Derek

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Re: Baseboard Surface
« Reply #51 on: February 26, 2020, 08:12:51 PM »
@degsy_safc    Yes, a "run round loop" is usually as you first described, ie. loco uncouples from stock, moves forward over a point and then runs back and past the train to couple to the other end.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Headshunt#Run-round
« Last Edit: February 26, 2020, 08:16:35 PM by ntpntpntp »
Nick.   2016 celebrating the 20th anniversary of "Königshafen" exhibition layout!

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Re: Baseboard Surface
« Reply #52 on: February 26, 2020, 08:13:28 PM »
These days I rarely use point motors, I much prefer wire in tube, much cheaper and no motors to burn out. Easy to operate two points e.g crossovers, from one wire using cranks. My baseboards are 4'x2'x2" foam insulation boards with a covering of cork floooring tiles, cut a channel in the cork to run the wire in tube, cover with filler, then scenic scatter, road surface or paving etc.

Hi Dorsetmike,

Now that's a clever idea, but as my baseboards are solid ply I wouldn't be able to gouge it out for channels, plus as its quite a long L i'd have to keep moving back and forward between the different boards to pull push the wire. But thanks for the comment - the people on this forum are very creative in terms of doing things away from the norm..

Cheers Derek. 
Cheers Derek

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Re: Baseboard Surface
« Reply #53 on: February 26, 2020, 08:15:05 PM »
@degsy_safc    Yes, a "run round loop" is usually as you first described, ie. loco uncouples from stop, moves forward over a point and then runs back and past the train to couple to the other end.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Headshunt#Run-round

Great - many thanks @ntpntpntp  :thumbsup:

Cheers Derek
Cheers Derek

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Re: Baseboard Surface
« Reply #54 on: February 26, 2020, 08:24:00 PM »
Hi All,

So a bit more cosmetic construction in the loft. that horrible 30+ year old carpet that was in there before we moved in has now been pulled up. Ive started to lay the insulation boards and will start putting a laminate floor down tomorrow.

Plus the head of division doesn't seem to be adverse to me increasing the narrow part of my 'L' to be 32" straight across rather than narrowing to 18" - its not a lot more space taken up in the loft but should allow me to create some sidings on that part of the layout.

The levelling feet have also arrived from https://www.stationroadbaseboards.co.uk, so once I have the laminate down, I'll finish off the first 3 baseboards and then make a start on the final 2

Slowly slowly catchy monkey as the saying goes..

Cheers Derek
Cheers Derek

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Re: Baseboard Surface
« Reply #55 on: February 26, 2020, 08:24:10 PM »
These days I rarely use point motors, I much prefer wire in tube...

Now that's a clever idea, but as my baseboards are solid ply I wouldn't be able to gouge it out for channels, plus as its quite a long L i'd have to keep moving back and forward between the different boards to pull push the wire.

Wire in tube is a common manual method for changing points.  Actually the gouging out is easy, just make two cuts with a stanley knife then use a thin chisel (or an old screwdriver if you don't have a suitable chisel) and knock out a groove.

you're right about there being a practical limitation to the workable length though: most folk simply run to the edge of the board.

It is possible to use a sliding switch as a lever and also to change the frog polarity.

Here's a compact example  :)
Nick.   2016 celebrating the 20th anniversary of "Königshafen" exhibition layout!

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Re: Baseboard Surface
« Reply #56 on: February 27, 2020, 06:37:50 AM »
The problem with wire in tube is that, if you have a largish layout and have to set a lot of points to run trains, you have to run around like a blue fly to set everything up before you can start a train.  I have to set three or four routes before each run of three trains, which means setting between 16 and 24 points.  On my contoller, using Cobalts, I have only to select the three routes which means 4 buton pushes for each route, without having to rush around from point ot point (excuse the pun).
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Re: Baseboard Surface
« Reply #57 on: February 27, 2020, 07:09:09 AM »
Yes, the only practical way to do route setting is with point motors.
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Baseboard Surface
« Reply #58 on: February 27, 2020, 08:00:06 AM »
Yes, the only practical way to do route setting is with point motors.

Yes, I fully agree with Bealman here. All my points (even the ones inches from my hands in the fiddle yard!) are electrified with peco solenoid motors, in conjunction with Heathcote point indicators, a CDU and LEDs on the mimic diagrams so I can see which routes are set - see pics. Robin





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Re: Baseboard Surface
« Reply #59 on: February 27, 2020, 08:33:51 AM »
Yes, I have points right on the edge of the baseboard right above the control panel, operated electrically.

It was something I decided on at the beginning of construction.... all points to be motorised. That way you can add switching for signals, panel indicators, etc.

Your control panel is uber cool!  :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

I love the retro pointer knobs.

Definitely a brilliant piece of work.  :beers:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

 

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