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Author Topic: Locomotive nicknames  (Read 501 times)

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Offline bluedepot

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Re: Locomotive nicknames
« Reply #15 on: August 15, 2019, 12:56:55 PM »
also...

rats and mcrats for 25 and 26/27

peds for 31s

slim jim for 33/2

i dont use them but often enthusiast magazines seem to use nicknames


tim


Offline Dorsetmike

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Re: Locomotive nicknames
« Reply #16 on: August 15, 2019, 01:28:37 PM »
Southern steam had quite a few,Black motors, Greyhounds, small and large hoppers, terriers, woolworths, schools and arthurs among others.
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Offline kirky

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Re: Locomotive nicknames
« Reply #17 on: August 15, 2019, 02:06:30 PM »
And to bring it upto date, I believe 68s are referred to as 'dogs'

Personally I hate nicknames for locos. Much prefer the class number eg class 68.

Cheers
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Offline Intercity

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Re: Locomotive nicknames
« Reply #18 on: August 15, 2019, 04:47:48 PM »
I grew up with the “sparkies”, a few of the common nicknames I was around (diesel and electric):

08 - Gronk or 350
31 - Peds (the enthusiasts were know as Ped Neds)
37 - Tractors
43 (HST) - Trams
47 - Duff or Spoon (enthusiasts known as Spoon Goons)
56 - Grids
58 - Bones
66 - Sheds
81 to 85 - Roarers
86 - Cans
87 - Vans
90 - Skodas

1st Gen DMUs - Boggo

Some EMUs had names

304 - Dinos/Dinosaurs
321 - Dusty Bins
205 - Thumpers
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Offline kirky

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Re: Locomotive nicknames
« Reply #19 on: August 15, 2019, 05:06:12 PM »
142s - donkeys (nodding ones)

cheers
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Offline grid078

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Re: Locomotive nicknames
« Reply #20 on: August 15, 2019, 07:56:00 PM »
Class 20 also known as "bombs" and class 31 "goyle's" think one of the electrics was known as a "spark" possibly 86?. Also 47/4's "generators"

Stu

Offline Pete @ EGLM

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Re: Locomotive nicknames
« Reply #21 on: August 15, 2019, 11:33:45 PM »
20s were “single Enders”
50s were “bleeps” according to drivers
47s were “Hawker Sids”.....Brush were owned by Hawker Siddeley at the time

Offline ntpntpntp

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Re: Locomotive nicknames
« Reply #22 on: August 16, 2019, 08:46:33 AM »

Persuaded me poor old mam to buy a Triang Hornby Carousel set with all those horrible plastic cars with silver wheels, just so I could get the Jinty!

It had Magnadhesion and Synchrosmoke, too!  :smiley-laughing:

I had one of those sets. Were those car carriers with the lifting middle section actually based on a UK prototype, it always seemed a bit weird to me?   I painted the tyres on my cars.

Fond memories of my Triang Hornby stuff as a lad.  Mad Dad was working in Fiji in the mid 70s, he used to go to all the the effort of posting back sets and models he found in a little shop.  In fact my first N gauge was a Bachmann set bought during the summer of 74 when Mum and I flew out there for about 6 weeks.

Sorry, gone OT  :D


I'm not a fan of these nicknames for locos, "08", "47" etc. means much more to me.
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Online Bealman

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Re: Locomotive nicknames
« Reply #23 on: August 16, 2019, 09:06:15 AM »
Not at all OT, as far as I'm concerned.

One of the strong points of this forum is the great memories it can spark off.  :thumbsup:

I think those car carriers were probably a Margate invention  :beers:
« Last Edit: August 16, 2019, 09:07:29 AM by Bealman »
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Offline ntpntpntp

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Re: Locomotive nicknames
« Reply #24 on: August 16, 2019, 12:11:37 PM »
I think those car carriers were probably a Margate invention  :beers:

Just done a bit more searching. They seem to have been referred to as Tierwag  wagons.  The only photo of a real one I can find so far is the partial view top-left of this old article (scan borrowed from RMweb)
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Offline port perran

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Re: Locomotive nicknames
« Reply #25 on: August 16, 2019, 12:13:55 PM »
A Mickey Mouse?

One of my favourite classes and a great nickname.
I heard the origin of the nickname originated on the Southern where they used round train identification discs attached to the smokebox.
Being of narrow boiler, the discs extended upwards and outwards like Mickey’s ears.
I know not if that story is true but it is plausible and it’s a nice idea.

As for other nicknames from steam days, I rather like the term tanner ones for the ex GW 61xx prarie tanks.
As for diesels, we always called dmus “bugs” (not sure why).

If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Online railsquid

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Re: Locomotive nicknames
« Reply #26 on: August 16, 2019, 12:25:00 PM »
And to bring it upto date, I believe 68s are referred to as 'dogs'

Personally I hate nicknames for locos. Much prefer the class number eg class 68.

Ditto, except for the "classic" ones (Warship, Western, Deltic).

I can kind of mentally translate pre-TOPS classifications such as "Brush Type 4" into class 47, in the same way I can more-or-less mentally translate Fahrenheit into celsius.
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Offline Trainfish

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Re: Locomotive nicknames
« Reply #27 on: August 16, 2019, 12:44:01 PM »
Nobody has mentioned a flying banana have they?
John

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Offline njee20

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Re: Locomotive nicknames
« Reply #28 on: August 16, 2019, 12:46:25 PM »
And to bring it upto date, I believe 68s are referred to as 'dogs'

Personally I hate nicknames for locos. Much prefer the class number eg class 68.

Ditto, except for the "classic" ones (Warship, Western, Deltic).

I can kind of mentally translate pre-TOPS classifications such as "Brush Type 4" into class 47, in the same way I can more-or-less mentally translate Fahrenheit into celsius.

Yep, same. Particularly on the newer classes where it feels people desperately have to try and find a nickname for things!

Offline martyn

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Re: Locomotive nicknames
« Reply #29 on: August 16, 2019, 12:56:15 PM »
When I became interested in real railways, as opposed to models, in the early 70s, the diesel nicknames were generally unused, AFAIK.

The first 20 Brush Type 2s (class 31) were known to the train crews as 'Toffee apples' after the shape of the master controller handle; the Skinhead term didn't come until the early 70s for those fitted with disc headcodes.

Peaks, Westerns, Deltics, etc, were just known as that. The only unusual nickname I can remember in common use was 'Cromptons' for the 33s, after the maker of the electrical equipment. Many of the Gronk, Tractor, etc, nicknames seem to have originated, or at least became widely publicised, through enthusiast magazines. Or I lived a sheltered life...….

Another steam nickname was 'Wooferdonks' for the Austerity 2-8-0s, at least in parts of East Anglia.

'Woof' of the exhaust, followed by 'donk' of the coupling rods and valve gear going round....

Martyn
« Last Edit: August 16, 2019, 01:02:03 PM by martyn, Reason: spelling »

 

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