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Author Topic: The Coniston Railway  (Read 6867 times)

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Online crewearpley40

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #255 on: January 20, 2020, 10:24:54 AM »
Look forward to the signals  and the level construction

Offline Train Waiting

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #256 on: January 20, 2020, 04:29:31 PM »
Most excellent, Chris.  Thank you very much indeed.

An interesting station and, briefly, the terminus of two separate railways - the Furness and the Whitehaven & Furness Junction.

As far as I'm aware, the Railway Clearing House (RCH), may have been instrumental in the Broughton in Furness name to avoid confusion with Broughton*.  Certainly the nameboards at the station and the signal box simply said Broughton.

I expect you'll be at Foxfield by Easter!

* On the Caledonian Railway's line from Symington to Peebles.  By the way, a tortuous goods-only line connected the Caley and North British at Peebles.  It ran beside, and then crossed, the Tweed and much its the route survives as a footpath.  A jolly nice stroll!

Best wishes.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

For the made-up background to the railway and list of characters, please see here: https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=38281.msg607991#msg607991

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #257 on: January 20, 2020, 04:45:58 PM »
Looking really good.
Please keep the updates coming.

Martim
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Online chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #258 on: January 20, 2020, 05:27:44 PM »
An interesting station and, briefly, the terminus of two separate railways - the Furness and the Whitehaven & Furness Junction.

It was indeed - with a platform shared by both companies, an engine shed owned by the WFJ and the goods yard owned by the FR. The platform and engine shed were removed when the station was altered for the Coniston Railway but by then the WFJ had built a line from the Duddon crossing direct to Foxfield and, of course, within seven years the FR had taken over the WFJ - having already taken over the CR.

Quote
As far as I'm aware, the Railway Clearing House (RCH), may have been instrumental in the Broughton in Furness name to avoid confusion with Broughton*.  Certainly the nameboards at the station and the signal box simply said Broughton.

That makes sense.

Quote
I expect you'll be at Foxfield by Easter!

Not a chance - haven't got enough room for that as well :D



Online chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #259 on: January 20, 2020, 05:29:46 PM »
Looking really good.
Please keep the updates coming.

Thanks mate, will do.
I'm currently installing all the droppers and the IRJs for isolating the signal or crossing controlled track sections.

Online crewearpley40

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #260 on: January 20, 2020, 05:40:36 PM »
Re wagon turntables maybe a lever with wire attaChed ? There maybe a thread started 7 year ago if search wagon turntables. I just googled wagon turntables in n gauge
« Last Edit: January 20, 2020, 05:43:15 PM by crewearpley40 »

Online chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #261 on: January 24, 2020, 08:56:28 AM »
Well, the Bobby at Woodland is happy now. He's got some levers to pull, a stove to keep him warm and a roof over his head to keep him dry;








Whilst it's still not perfect, I do think that it's an improvement on my printed and cut card efforts on Coniston. The slate plinth and roof are still made from my my printed card but the timber cabin part is plasticard scored before painting for the planking with the structural timbers from thin plasticard strips painted and added on top of the weatherboard layer.

I solved the problem of doing the window frames (which I attempted on Coniston with thin strips of plasticard) by cheating and using the brass etches from a Ration signal box interior kit. Thye aren't exactly right for the window frames at the real Woodland box but they look a darned sight better than I could have done from scratch so I can live with that slight aberration.

Having seen that the better windows made the interior more visible I also used the levers from the Ratio kit, painted in the correct colours according to their functions and locations in the frame, and used the stove and part of the instrument shelf too - although the latter and Bobby himself are further back and not really visible.

I also improved on my plasticard strip construction of the steps on Coniston by further cheating - in the form of Plastruct steps and handrail mouldings - much easier and better looking ;-)


That just leaves two tasks to do on Woodland before it's finished bar bringing to life with people, animals, goods yard loads, etc. I have to fit a lamp or two to the station building and put a guide in under the mechanism for the Up starter signal - which doesn't always return fully to danger, due to the plunger of the solenoid being able to rotate slightly and not pushing the actuating wire up fully.

That last task above will be easier to do with the baseboard up on edge so the plan is now to remove Woodland from the overall layout so I can do that and attach Broughton to the fiddle yard instead so I can test all the track thoroughly before fixing it down permanently. Putting Broughton where Woodland currently is will also give me more room to work on it, which will be a bonus.

« Last Edit: January 24, 2020, 09:08:42 AM by chrism »

Online crewearpley40

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #262 on: January 24, 2020, 09:22:13 AM »
Two words : absolutely stunning.

Offline Train Waiting

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #263 on: January 24, 2020, 04:46:11 PM »
No, Chris; not 'cheating'; wonderful modelling.

And excellent photographs as well.

Many thanks and best wishes.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

For the made-up background to the railway and list of characters, please see here: https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=38281.msg607991#msg607991

Online chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #264 on: January 28, 2020, 07:01:11 PM »
Things are progressing at Broughton.
All the track, having been tested, has now been stuck down so I turned my hand to the next fiddly job - in the form of the two wagon turntables at the northern end of the goods yard. As I said previously, I have no intention of making them go round and round so they are based upon fixed track lengths.

Having got the sidings to which they attach fixed down, I laid a very thin sheet of plasticard across the ends, added more track to both sidings and glued it to the plasticard. This allowed me to lift it so I could work on the turntables on the workbench and fit them to the layout when completed.

The first step was to lay the cross track between the sidings and off to each side. Once the glue was set, out came the trusty not-a-dremel to cut the cross track flangeways through the sidings' rails. Then I cut suitable lengths of rail to complete the cross track in the sidings' four foot ways. Once that was done and tested to ensure that wagons will run through the turntables I got busy with a scalpel and a sheet of Ratio wood planking plastic. When they were finished I could then add them to the layout and fix down the sidings beyond the turntables.
They are a bit "rough and ready" but should look OK once they've been painted, the track ballasted and the ground level raised to at least sleeper top level if not to rail level.

I didn't test the turntables with any locomotives because I doubt that locos would have been permitted to cross the real ones so I've isolated the sidings between the loop points and the turntables and fitted diodes so that locos can run clear of the loop points to run around but proceed no further than that. Any wagons parked beyond the turntables (which includes any cattle trucks at the cattle dock) will have to be retrieved using a few more wagons to "fill the gap".

Also in a couple of the pics is the fledgling level crossing, just put in place for now to check clearances. The gates are temporary "test" ones, pending all the crossing and road being completed. The gates are linked by gearwheels under the baseboard so that all four move together, however I haven't yet fitted the motor nor started on the control circuitry.








The next stage, following a bit more testing (OK, playing) will be to detach it from the fiddle yard and get the baseboard up on edge so I can tidy the power wiring then it's on to point motors, uncouplers and all the electrickery through to the control panel.
 
« Last Edit: January 28, 2020, 07:03:24 PM by chrism »

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #265 on: January 28, 2020, 07:07:49 PM »
Thanks chris. A superb tutorial. Plasticard has had its uses. With me fixing e bad couple of fish plates and signalling work meant use of such material to reinforce the track whilst work was carried out. More tutorials we look forward to

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #266 on: January 30, 2020, 12:37:10 PM »
You've just made me realise that I need to do some wagon turntables on Milliedale on Sea!

although got a fair bit of track to lay first!  :smiley-laughing:

I think you're right on the locos not being allowed onto the turntables, I believe they'd have been hand or rope shunted on (poles used for leverage for hand) rope shunting used capstan winches to allow one man to move a wagon, they may also have capstan bollards round which ropes could be routed to allow a loco on the track to pull a wagon onto the turntable from the 90deg track (I've seen this beautifully done on an 0 gauge layout)

there would, as you suggest also be the reach wagon method of using a handy wagon or two, which is the easiest method to use in N gauge :D

Online chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #267 on: January 30, 2020, 01:28:11 PM »
I think you're right on the locos not being allowed onto the turntables, I believe they'd have been hand or rope shunted on (poles used for leverage for hand) rope shunting used capstan winches to allow one man to move a wagon, they may also have capstan bollards round which ropes could be routed to allow a loco on the track to pull a wagon onto the turntable from the 90deg track (I've seen this beautifully done on an 0 gauge layout)

It's possible that early locos were allowed across (the turntables were in place when Broughton was jointly owned/operated by the Furness and Whitehaven & Furness Junction railways, being in the Furness Railway's goods yard at that time) but later ones would undoubtedly have been too heavy.

The limited number of photos available don't show any bollards for rope hauling (they don't show much of the yard at all other than a couple of rather long distance shots) but I suspect that there would have been some - I'll include 'em anyway.
I'll probably have a wagon at the dock on the cross track but it'll be a permanent fixture - like the ash and coal wagons will be in Coniston's loco yard.

Quote
there would, as you suggest also be the reach wagon method of using a handy wagon or two, which is the easiest method to use in N gauge :D

That's the way I'll be doing it anyway.
I've made sure that wagons can be successfully propelled and drawn back across the turntables but I've only put in one uncoupling solenoid, to allow cattle wagons to be pushed up to the cattle pen and left behind. Any other wagons will either have to have been pushed into the eastern spur in front of a cattle wagon or will also be permanent fixtures - any in the western spur will just be permanent fixtures anyway since there will be no means of uncoupling them other then the big hand from the sky  ;)


Offline Black Sheep

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #268 on: January 30, 2020, 05:31:22 PM »


The limited number of photos available don't show any bollards for rope hauling (they don't show much of the yard at all other than a couple of rather long distance shots) but I suspect that there would have been some - I'll include 'em anyway.
I'll probably have a wagon at the dock on the cross track but it'll be a permanent fixture - like the ash and coal wagons will be in Coniston's loco yard.


I forgot to mention the other popular method of shunting wagons, the one horsepower dobbin

Online chrism

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Re: The Coniston Railway
« Reply #269 on: January 31, 2020, 06:36:03 AM »
I've made sure that wagons can be successfully propelled and drawn back across the turntables but I've only put in one uncoupling solenoid, to allow cattle wagons to be pushed up to the cattle pen and left behind. Any other wagons will either have to have been pushed into the eastern spur in front of a cattle wagon or will also be permanent fixtures - any in the western spur will just be permanent fixtures anyway since there will be no means of uncoupling them other then the big hand from the sky  ;)

Update - upon checking the wiring plans I found that I had one unallocated pin in the connector to the LH baseboard and several spares in the one connecting the two baseboards - so I've added an uncoupling solenoid in the western spur too. So I'll be able to park and retrieve wagons from both spurs with no need for the big hand from the sky after all  ;)

 

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