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Author Topic: 3D Resin printing - on my new printer  (Read 2103 times)

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Offline Paul B

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Re: 3D Resin printing - on my new printer
« Reply #15 on: April 28, 2019, 09:31:24 PM »

The prints of the Zeppelin Rail car and the GWR Rail car are publicly listed and free to use non commercially.  The GWR file is well designed whilst the Zeppelin has known errors and I wanted to see how the software treated these errors.  In practice there are bumps but no loss of integrity which is good.

Here is the Zeppelin cleaned up and sat on a Tomix chassis as a test. Sanded and filled its going to be an eye catcher





Only just seen this and all I can say is WOW!!  :o  If this is the sort of quality that modern 3D printers can produce, I may have a project that I was going to have a go at scratch-building, but this looks like a quicker prospect! Where are such models listed, so that I can find if they have an example of this -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxtorpeda#/media/File:Luxtorpeda_Fablok_Zakopane_1936.jpg

This is a 1930's high speed diesel rail-car used in southern Poland, for first class passengers be=tween Krakow and the skiing resort of Zakopane. The first time I saw it I decided that I would love an N gauge model of this one day, and I even have an almost correct sized chassis waiting for it!
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Offline Only Me

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Re: 3D Resin printing - on my new printer
« Reply #16 on: April 28, 2019, 09:46:19 PM »
@Paul B  with a great resin printer you can make most things and if it has AA (Anti aliasing) it doesnt leave step marks in curves either... class 07 and wipac class 37 noses from my Photon




Online Snowwolflair

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Re: 3D Resin printing - on my new printer
« Reply #17 on: April 28, 2019, 09:47:11 PM »

The prints of the Zeppelin Rail car and the GWR Rail car are publicly listed and free to use non commercially.  The GWR file is well designed whilst the Zeppelin has known errors and I wanted to see how the software treated these errors.  In practice there are bumps but no loss of integrity which is good.

Here is the Zeppelin cleaned up and sat on a Tomix chassis as a test. Sanded and filled its going to be an eye catcher





Only just seen this and all I can say is WOW!!  :o  If this is the sort of quality that modern 3D printers can produce, I may have a project that I was going to have a go at scratch-building, but this looks like a quicker prospect! Where are such models listed, so that I can find if they have an example of this -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxtorpeda#/media/File:Luxtorpeda_Fablok_Zakopane_1936.jpg

This is a 1930's high speed diesel rail-car used in southern Poland, for first class passengers be=tween Krakow and the skiing resort of Zakopane. The first time I saw it I decided that I would love an N gauge model of this one day, and I even have an almost correct sized chassis waiting for it!

This is the quality the latest printers can print for this size of print.  I have had a smaller printer for seven years that can print 2" by 1" but impossible to print something this size.  Shapeways have been able to offer printing like this fro a few years but the machines are +£20,000 where as the modern machines for home use of this quality are now from £400 to £1,400.

This particular model was a download from Thingverse and I used it as a good known design to test my printer.

I do like your rail car, it would make an eye catching model.

Online Snowwolflair

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Re: 3D Resin printing - on my new printer
« Reply #18 on: April 28, 2019, 09:50:50 PM »
A general thought.

If your CAD skills are not up to making a model there are designers for hire through Shapeways for quite reasonable sums to do CAD for you and they will also make sure their designs meet Shapeways design rules.  Most are students earning beer money.

Offline Mr Sprue

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Re: 3D Resin printing - on my new printer
« Reply #19 on: April 28, 2019, 10:00:08 PM »
A general thought.

If your CAD skills are not up to making a model there are designers for hire through Shapeways for quite reasonable sums to do CAD for you and they will also make sure their designs meet Shapeways design rules.  Most are students earning beer money.

Judging on the picture that "Only Me" has posted he doesn't need any help in that department!

Online Snowwolflair

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Re: 3D Resin printing - on my new printer
« Reply #20 on: April 28, 2019, 10:07:33 PM »
A general thought.

If your CAD skills are not up to making a model there are designers for hire through Shapeways for quite reasonable sums to do CAD for you and they will also make sure their designs meet Shapeways design rules.  Most are students earning beer money.

Judging on the picture that "Only Me" has posted he doesn't need any help in that department!

I like his work.  CAD becomes second nature with practice.  I have used 2D CAD since the days of DOS, but have done little in 3D until I started to work with 3D printers.  My first 3D printer was 15 years ago and was a first generation RepRap and the CAD was block architecture.  Im now on my fourth  :) but this is the first viable one for N Gauge as it has a footprint of A5 so I can print full coaches flat and square (or angled if it improves the print).

Offline Mr Sprue

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Re: 3D Resin printing - on my new printer
« Reply #21 on: April 29, 2019, 12:22:39 PM »
With the evolution of engineering I have to use CAD, CAM and interact with G Codes.

But I've reached the conclusion that there is no one who knows every inch of CAD & CAM especially the top end programs as they have evolved over the years with each year having more software data added to them.

The complexity of CAD software can be immense especially surface modeling. High end software such as the likes of CATIA, Solidworks and PTC Creo are programs that require in house training before anyone can go out into the big world to work as a CAD engineer.

Of course there is always good old youtube videos for those who want to venture down the self taught route, but even so years of practical experience doesn't automatically make people qualified for which there are obvious reasons.

Offline Paul B

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Re: 3D Resin printing - on my new printer
« Reply #22 on: April 29, 2019, 05:08:22 PM »
@Paul B  with a great resin printer you can make most things and if it has AA (Anti aliasing) it doesn't leave step marks in curves either... class 07 and wipac class 37 noses from my Photon



That's a lovely model! But I doubt that I could ever design something that good, as I have no experience with CAD or any other design software! (I can use these infernal machines for a fair bit, but CAD looks beyond me!)
LNER (and PKP) fan in the home of the GWR!

Offline Paul B

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Re: 3D Resin printing - on my new printer
« Reply #23 on: April 29, 2019, 05:09:42 PM »
A general thought.

If your CAD skills are not up to making a model there are designers for hire through Shapeways for quite reasonable sums to do CAD for you and they will also make sure their designs meet Shapeways design rules.  Most are students earning beer money.

Thanks for the advice! I have just had a look at Shapeways design section, and may well have a try along that route!
LNER (and PKP) fan in the home of the GWR!

Online Snowwolflair

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Re: 3D Resin printing - on my new printer
« Reply #24 on: April 29, 2019, 05:36:06 PM »
@Paul B  with a great resin printer you can make most things and if it has AA (Anti aliasing) it doesnt leave step marks.

True, but I think its too general a statement.  AA is a mathematical algorithm and is like putting a filter on your camera.  It delivers a different effect usually based on interference patterns.

With AA on it adds smoothing between layers by degrading them to give a better transition giving a smoother surface over larger areas, however, at the same time it also adds smoothing to detail which generally being small is distorted, and in some cases is removed.  (i.e. a planked wood surface in N can loose the inter plank grooving or the safety valve cover on a GWR loco looses the sharpness of its profile).

I find the best way to proceed is to try both on and off and pick which I prefer as there is no always correct way.

By example if I was making a steam locomotive that would use separately printed fittings (like the one i'm working on) I would switch on AA for the shape of the body where there is little fine detail, and switch it off to print the detailed parts.

Offline Flakmunky

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Re: 3D Resin printing - on my new printer
« Reply #25 on: May 05, 2019, 03:18:04 PM »
Sorry, what printer is this you are using?

And can the printing software import FBX files?
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Online Snowwolflair

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Re: 3D Resin printing - on my new printer
« Reply #26 on: May 05, 2019, 03:28:52 PM »
Sorry, what printer is this you are using?

And can the printing software import FBX files?

Phrosen Shuffle XL and they have a distributor in London who holds resins and spares.

I use ChiTuBox to prepare files as it holds the printer and resin profiles.  I primarily accepts stl files, however its a free download if you want to try compatibility.

Offline Railwaygun

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Re: 3D Resin printing - on my new printer
« Reply #27 on: May 13, 2019, 07:58:25 AM »
Now that we can get Professional quality bodies at the ( literal) press of a button, what are the possibilities of chassis production using (?sintering) - or are metal loaded plastics a possibility?

It’s  the prospect of applying an 18c technology ( a file) to a 19C chassis to support a 21C body that depresses me!

However I stand in awe at your ability to knock up new parts in “ minutes”

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Re: 3D Resin printing - on my new printer
« Reply #28 on: May 13, 2019, 10:26:16 AM »
Now that we can get Professional quality bodies at the ( literal) press of a button, what are the possibilities of chassis production using (?sintering) - or are metal loaded plastics a possibility?

It’s  the prospect of applying an 18c technology ( a file) to a 19C chassis to support a 21C body that depresses me!

However I stand in awe at your ability to knock up new parts in “ minutes”

NickR

I did some tests on a print resin yesterday called Rock Black and when hard it has the characteristics of chassis plastic.  I don't see any reason that with some careful design chassis could not be created, possibly using the 2mm society brass axle bushes as inserts to stop wear.

The other thing to remember is that it is possible to print in casting wax.  This can then be commercially lost wax cast in brass or other metal to give weight.  I might need to do this with the SR Lord Nelson tender body or chassis.

Offline Doc Pye

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Re: 3D Resin printing - on my new printer
« Reply #29 on: May 13, 2019, 01:36:56 PM »
Very interesting indeed! I am going to be shortly taking the plunge by getting an AnyCubic Photon Resin printer. So I will follow this thread! Shapeways has just become so stupid in their pricing/shipping, that it is time to go the DIY route. Hopefully it won't be a terribly painful exercise. At first I will look to print others STL files - you can buy loads of them or get them free at various places - so that I can learn what is what. Next step will be trying to design things...which to be honest, it the more daunting task! Still, I use to think I couldn't sculpt miniatures but I learned to do that at my old age....so might as well give it a try.

Not seeking to hijack this thread, but any tips/pointers/etc are welcome! :)

 

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