!!

Not Registered?

Welcome!  Please register to view all of the new posts and forum boards - some of which are hidden to guests.  After registering and gaining 10 posts you will be able to sell and buy items on our N'porium.

If you have any problems registering, then please check your spam filter before emailing us.  Hotmail users seem to find their emails in the Junk folder.


Thanks for reading,
The NGF Staff.

Author Topic: 1920 branch line station signals  (Read 349 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online Corbie

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 12314
  • 2mm Association Number: 5516
  • Posts: 105
  • Country: scotland
  • Gender: Male
    • Instagram
    • Awards
Re: 1920 branch line station signals
« Reply #15 on: March 11, 2020, 01:22:12 PM »
I've heard back from Mr. Maxtone of GNSRA who has been extremely kind and helpful in helping me to understand the system.
Before a train was accepted from the signal boxes on either side, platform lines had to be completely clear. In unusual circumstances (traffic at Pitlurg was low density) there may have been special instructions to allow acceptance of a train if the line was clear to the home signal only, with the train being cautioned that the line was clear but that the station may be blocked.
Any shunting that took place would have gone outside the home signals so before starting the signalman would block back to either side, then, after shunting was complete, signal obstruction removed.
So as you first suggested Rich. Pitlurg was a tiny rural station, the nearest village or town being more than 4 miles away, with only one small goods shed and low traffic.
Pre-grouping steam / LNER / early BR.

Online chrism

  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1011
  • Country: gb
  • The Coniston Railway
    • Awards
Re: 1920 branch line station signals
« Reply #16 on: March 11, 2020, 01:39:23 PM »
there may have been special instructions to allow acceptance of a train if the line was clear to the home signal only, with the train being cautioned that the line was clear but that the station may be blocked.

We had that at a heritage railway for which I was a volunteer in the eighties.

The passenger stock for two trains was stored at one end station, occupying both platforms, whilst the loco shed & yard were at the other. The loco to be sent down to collect the first train of the day was invariably released under Regulation 5, "Section Clear, Junction Blocked", the instruction being given verbally by the signalman when handing over the train staff or ticket - we didn't have the electric token machines installed at that time.

Offline Train Waiting

  • Larger Gallery
  • Trade Count: (+5)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2989
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • The Table-Top Railway.
    • Awards
Re: 1920 branch line station signals
« Reply #17 on: March 11, 2020, 02:45:43 PM »
The only query I still have is how did they re-attach the goods brake van after Shunting? It must have been left somewhere, as I doubt it would have used either of the sidings, which would have reduced the goods yard to one road?

Hello Rich

I assume that the brake van would remain, with the rest of the train, on the up platform road.  It would be under the protection of No. 14 home signal.  I expect (and should be glad to hear your view) that the fireman, when surrendering the Pitlurg-Cruden Bay token, would have observed the signalman put a collar on No. 14 lever and then would have 'signed the book'.

One thing is clear, there appears to have been a few unsignalled movements associated with shunting the yard.  The Boddam branch was a late one, opening in 1897.  Presumably, the BoT was satisfied with the arrangement as it was only for occasional goods traffic and the line was controlled by electric token instruments.

Best wishes.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

For the made-up background to the railway and list of characters, please see here: https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=38281.msg607991#msg607991

Offline MarshLane

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • 2mm Association Number: 5440
  • Posts: 123
  • Country: gb
    • Awards
Re: 1920 branch line station signals
« Reply #18 on: March 11, 2020, 11:20:52 PM »
I've heard back from Mr. Maxtone of GNSRA who has been extremely kind and helpful in helping me to understand the system.
Before a train was accepted from the signal boxes on either side, platform lines had to be completely clear. In unusual circumstances (traffic at Pitlurg was low density) there may have been special instructions to allow acceptance of a train if the line was clear to the home signal only, with the train being cautioned that the line was clear but that the station may be blocked.
Any shunting that took place would have gone outside the home signals so before starting the signalman would block back to either side, then, after shunting was complete, signal obstruction removed.
So as you first suggested Rich. Pitlurg was a tiny rural station, the nearest village or town being more than 4 miles away, with only one small goods shed and low traffic.

That makes sense. I am pleased we've got to the bottom of it. Blocking back seemed an unusual move, but with the level of traffic it was obviously the best way of achieving the end result.

So what are your plans for the layout now?

I assume that the brake van would remain, with the rest of the train, on the up platform road.  It would be under the protection of No. 14 home signal.  I expect (and should be glad to hear your view) that the fireman, when surrendering the Pitlurg-Cruden Bay token, would have observed the signalman put a collar on No. 14 lever and then would have 'signed the book'.

One thing is clear, there appears to have been a few unsignalled movements associated with shunting the yard.  The Boddam branch was a late one, opening in 1897.  Presumably, the BoT was satisfied with the arrangement as it was only for occasional goods traffic and the line was controlled by electric token instruments.

Hi John,
Yes, again sounds a logical way of working. Presumably the timetable was such that there was no passenger traffic on the branch when the goods were about, which would have probably meant that the BoT was satisfied a lot easier ... and cheaper!

Rich

Online Corbie

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 12314
  • 2mm Association Number: 5516
  • Posts: 105
  • Country: scotland
  • Gender: Male
    • Instagram
    • Awards
Re: 1920 branch line station signals
« Reply #19 on: March 12, 2020, 10:05:38 AM »

So what are your plans for the layout now?

Rich

@MarshLane I've got a thread at https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=47694.0 showing the progress- not much to show as yet. Ongoing projects are constructing 6 lattice semaphore signals from etched brass (as these are my first attempt at brass it may take some time!); continuing to model the contours from foam- at present these are too crude and need taking down a bit; painting the back board; making an insulating cover to stop it overheating on sunny days; attempting to construct relatively accurate 9ft wheelbase plank wagons by cannibalising kits; and producing my first scratch-built building. So, lots going on but maybe not much to show for quite a while.
If anyone has or knows of a video or set of pics showing someone constructing Wizard Models' lattice post semaphore signals let me know ;)
Pre-grouping steam / LNER / early BR.

 

Please Support Us!
April Goal: £60.00
Due Date: Apr 30
Total Receipts: £20.00
Below Goal: £40.00
Site Currency: GBP
33% 
April Donations


Advertise Here
anything
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal