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Author Topic: Averingcliffe  (Read 6404 times)

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Offline Train Waiting

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #30 on: February 17, 2019, 06:36:06 PM »
Very interesting photographs, David.  Thank you very much.

I agree with the Health and Safety Officer!

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

Offline Phoenix

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #31 on: February 17, 2019, 07:34:36 PM »
Lovely photos David,

The Mail depot is a great build.

All best wishes
Kevin

 :beers:

Offline cornish yorkie

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #32 on: February 18, 2019, 09:43:06 PM »
Lovely photos David,

The Mail depot is a great build.

All best wishes
Kevin

 :beers:
:hellosign:  seconded  :thumbsup:

Offline dannyboy

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #33 on: March 10, 2019, 03:29:25 PM »
Some more work done, so here is the next instalment -

Part VII

The Royal Mail depot has finally been opened and is now fully functioning. There was no ‘official’ opening, but the ribbon cutting ceremony was performed by Stanley and Anne’s two young daughters, Lynne and Diane. The Royal Mail Area Manager, Frank Barrens, along with Brian, Michael and Ian Wakefield and their wives and children were also invited. Some of the villagers were also in attendance. The museum has now been completed and, whilst there are still some more exhibits to be brought to the site, the museum, which is free to enter, (although donations are invited), is now open to the public. There are still some road markings to be laid in and around the depot but it was only last week that the road was resurfaced. It is understood that new street lights will be fitted soon.

Mail and parcels are brought in to the depot usually overnight, with the occasional train load being brought in during the morning. The arrangements made with Wakefield Dairies regarding the milk deliveries by tanker are now working well. There was a little bit of confusion to start with regarding  which line the tankers would be stored on whilst the mail train was brought in, as, of course, everything had to be clear of the main line. However, with the help of a ‘04’ shunter, owned by the dairy, this was soon sorted and the Royal Mail and Wakefield Dairies work happily alongside each other.

The three pairs of semi-detached houses, built on the old bomb site are all fully occupied, with a young family, Michael and Sue Sagar, in the process of moving into number two, the houses defying normal convention being numbered one to six, rather than have alternate numbers. Michael Sagar is having to do some urgent repairs on his car in the garage. (You can see his feet sticking out from under the front of his car).The houses were given the postcode DA5 1DS.
(Think about it!).

Albert and Mary Haigh run two little huts on a spare patch of land which is between the bridge and railway line at the west end of the village. Originally there was just the food hut run by Albert, (Bert), which mainly provided bacon butties for passing trade. It was not the most profitable of businesses and, eventually, Albert and Mary opened the second hut in order for Mary to sell fresh flowers and her dried flower arrangements, which she was extremely good at. Between them, they make enough to have a comfortable living. If you look very carefully, you can see Bert behind his counter.

The first picture is of Bert and Mary's huts


The next photo's are of the semi-detached houses




Then we have an overhead of the Royal Mail depot and Museum by night


and in daylight


and finally, one of the depot entrance


Now the more observant amongst you will have noticed that there are no chimney pots on the houses, there is a good reason for that .................... erm ......................... oh yes, a local builder is replacing them all.  ;)
David.
I used to be indecisive - now I'm not - I don't think.
If a friend seems distant, catch up with him.

Offline port perran

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #34 on: March 10, 2019, 03:32:54 PM »
Excellent David and thanks for the latest instalment of the back story.
Chimney pots are a nuisance if you are as ham fisted as me. I keep knocking them off!
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline dannyboy

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #35 on: March 10, 2019, 03:35:46 PM »

Chimney pots are a nuisance if you are as ham fisted as me. I keep knocking them off!

I admit it, I am as ham fisted as you!  :D. If the layout had been set in the modern era, everybody could have had central heating - no need for chimney pots.  :thumbsup:
David.
I used to be indecisive - now I'm not - I don't think.
If a friend seems distant, catch up with him.

Offline Train Waiting

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #36 on: March 10, 2019, 08:28:12 PM »
Many thanks, DA5 1D, for that fascinating post and super photographs.

I really like these Metcalfe 1930s 'semis' and maybe we'll see some on Poppingham.  If I make half as good a job of them as you have, I'll be well pleased.  Amazed, in fact!

Best wishes.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

Offline dannyboy

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #37 on: March 10, 2019, 08:34:20 PM »
@Train Waiting Thanks for that John. I must admit that I really like the Metcalfe kits, most of the buildings on Averingcliffe are Metcalfe, although I can think of three that I will try scratch building - the two tram sheds and the six lane engine shed. Glad you have worked the postcode out.  :thumbsup:
David.
I used to be indecisive - now I'm not - I don't think.
If a friend seems distant, catch up with him.

Offline Rowlie

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #38 on: March 10, 2019, 09:14:12 PM »
Hi David, enjoying the backstory, bringing your layout to life. Royal Mail depot is very good.

Offline keithbythe sea

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #39 on: March 11, 2019, 07:54:19 AM »
Just caught up with your thread David. Great stuff!  :thankyousign:

Offline cornish yorkie

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #40 on: March 11, 2019, 09:53:45 PM »
 :hellosign:  :greatpicturessign:
    Many thanks for the updates David, all looking really good & just as an aside many moons ago I worked in the old Royal Mail parcels depot in Leeds with a chap called David Wakefield
     regards Derek

Offline dannyboy

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #41 on: March 11, 2019, 10:16:16 PM »
@cornish yorkie  I don't think my late father ever worked at Leeds, but he was at Valley Road Sorting Office, Bradford for a few years.  I wonder if David Wakefield is related to the Wakefield's of the dairy?  ??? ;)
David.
I used to be indecisive - now I'm not - I don't think.
If a friend seems distant, catch up with him.

Offline cornish yorkie

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #42 on: March 13, 2019, 10:15:00 PM »
  :hellosign: David, yes small world, my mother who was born in Bradford worked at Leeds MLO
    regards Derek.

Offline dannyboy

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #43 on: March 23, 2019, 07:42:00 PM »
The next part of the Averingcliffe story is as follows -

Part VIII
In part III it was stated that 18 workers cottages were destroyed in the bombing of 1944 and that another 6 cottages had to be demolished. Further examination of historical records reveals that, in fact, only 4 cottages had to be demolished – it is not known how this historical inaccuracy happened. The cottages were originally numbered 1 to 34 Railway Cuttings, with numbers 1 to 22 being the ones bombed or demolished. Numbers 23 to 34 remain and, whilst some of the cottages are still occupied by dairy workers, some have been sold to ‘incomers’. It is not known exactly how the name ‘Railway Cuttings’ came about, as there is no railway cutting in the vicinity. However, the cottages were built adjacent to some red brick terraced houses and shops which had been built to house workers at the nearby railway maintenance facility. There is a mainline station not too far away which had been built in anticipation of a burgeoning influx of workers although this never really materialised. The station does serve as a point for holiday makers to transfer to a train to take them to the nearby seaside. The original idea for the maintenance facility came about because the owners of the land, the South Tentdale, Exland And Marple Railway, wanted to have one of the most modern maintenance facilities in the country, hoping to attract work from other railway companies. Sadly, this was never fully realised. Part of the facility was later sold to a preserved railway trust.
The occupants of Railway Cuttings vary in age with an elderly couple, Eileen and Frederick Cadamarteri living at number 34. Eileen and Frederick are friendly with the Wakefield family, as Fred, as he is known, originally came from Italy. The occupant of 23 Railway Cuttings was an Anthony Hancock, who had worked at the railway maintenance depot. Tony as he was known could be a cantankerous person and always had something to complain about. It was only last week that Tony had been to a blood donor session in the nearby town, “Never again”, he proclaimed, after giving what he described as “very nearly an arm full”. Numbers 27 and 28 have recently had the roofs replaced. Having seen the results, the other occupants of Railway Cuttings are thinking of replacing their roofs, although Mr. Hancock is, as usual, moaning about what it will cost.


And here we  have some photographs of Railway Cuttings -

Looking from the Royal Mail depot


Looking over the wall at the end of Railway Cuttings


Looking towards 'The Mountain' from the main road side


And finally an aerial shot


As you can see, there are a couple of remedial works required on some of the cottages, (flippin' camera close ups  :doh:), and the pavement area is currently being repaired by the Council. These photographs are as taken, I did do a bit of cropping but for some reason, I have 'lost' them on the way to the gallery!   ???
David.
I used to be indecisive - now I'm not - I don't think.
If a friend seems distant, catch up with him.

Offline cornish yorkie

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Re: Averingcliffe
« Reply #44 on: March 24, 2019, 05:36:09 PM »
 :hellosign::greatpicturessign:
     Thanks David all looking good & thanks for the interesting back story
    regards Derek.

 

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