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Author Topic: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)  (Read 2973 times)

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Online DCCDave

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #75 on: February 08, 2020, 01:36:43 PM »
When I said the freight consist was interesting, I was in no way being critical. It just reminded me of how varied things used to be back then.

Hi Bealman,

I didn't take your post as criticism nor was any intended in my reply to your post.

On of the reasons I chose to model the Waverley is the train formations, A1s and A2s pulling five coach local passenger trains, long fitted goods trains running between Carlisle and Edinburgh and any number of mixed goods workings including, in one picture I have, a single van, two 16T minerals and a brake. hauled by a standard 4MT.

I absolutely agree there are some pretty interesting consists to be seen which are very modelable on a small layout.

Cheers
Dave
« Last Edit: February 08, 2020, 01:37:51 PM by DCCDave »

Offline Roy L S

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #76 on: February 08, 2020, 05:03:21 PM »
When I said the freight consist was interesting, I was in no way being critical. It just reminded me of how varied things used to be back then.

Hi Bealman,

I didn't take your post as criticism nor was any intended in my reply to your post.

On of the reasons I chose to model the Waverley is the train formations, A1s and A2s pulling five coach local passenger trains, long fitted goods trains running between Carlisle and Edinburgh and any number of mixed goods workings including, in one picture I have, a single van, two 16T minerals and a brake. hauled by a standard 4MT.

I absolutely agree there are some pretty interesting consists to be seen which are very modelable on a small layout.

Cheers
Dave

Let's not forget the inevitable "tail traffic" of vans attached to local passenger trains.

Agreed Dave, the Waverley Route is a spectacular and highly modellable railway, I have already chosen Heriot as my next exhibition layout which I will start at some point in the not too distant future.

Roy

Offline belstone

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #77 on: February 08, 2020, 05:12:48 PM »

Let's not forget the inevitable "tail traffic" of vans attached to local passenger trains.

I found this the other day on derbysulzers.com (Bruce McCartney photo)



A four wheel parcels van between loco and first coach of the "Waverley". Even by WR standards that's a bit rustic.
Richard

Offline belstone

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #78 on: February 08, 2020, 07:45:00 PM »
A couple of hours' useful work this morning, with the first of the storage loop boards coming together:



Nice and rigid once I put the diagonal brace in.  I was hoping to spend much of tomorrow working on baseboards, but my workshop is forty minutes' drive from home along tree-lined roads, and I don't much like the look of the weather forecast.  Amber warning for high winds last time I looked. 

So instead I'll probably spend the day fiddling with some of the various smaller bits and pieces that will make up this layout.  I started after tea with signals.  These are awkward, being North British lattice post examples.  Most of the signals on the Waverley were converted to upper quadrant by the LNER, but those at Stobs remained lower quadrant until they were removed in July 1961.  Stobs box was very seldom open: every photo I have seen shows the signals at clear in both directions, so I'm not going to bother making them work.  But how to model those posts?

MSE do an etched kit for a lattice post in N gauge but I suspect it is reduced from 4mm artwork.  I tried building a couple and found it impossible to get them straight due to heat from the soldering process.  Also, even though the lattices are as fine as is possible with etching they are still noticeably overscale.  I pondered various ways of making the signal posts, none of which seemed terribly easy.  Then it struck me that in many of the photos I was looking at I could barely see the lattices at all, just the uprights and a few internal braces holding the uprights together.

Can I get away with just modelling the uprights?  Only one way to find out:



The posts taper from bottom to top.  I went for 2.5mm width at the base tapering to 2mm at the top, drew some lines on a piece of Plastikard and used a pin vice to drill holes in a square pattern of spacings varying from 2 to 2.5mm.  I then cut out the squares and slid them onto four lengths of 0.7mm nickel silver wire, with a couple of bits of 2mm square strip trimmed down and inserted down the middle of the post at the base and the pivot point for the arm.  These various bits of plastic have been spotted in place with cyano: once it has set, hopefully I can trim the squares flush with the wires and have a signal post.  On the other hand it might just fall to bits.  Soldered brass squares would be better but Plastikard is a lot more forgiving when you are trying to hand drill tiny holes.

It will be interesting to see how this turns out.  I have a feeling the post might be a touch overscale but I'll see how it looks once painted.  I have some etched arms and glazing material but will need to fabricate a lamp and source some etched ladders to finish it off.

Tomorrow I might get the platform shelter under way.  Possibly the least photographed railway structure in Scotland: I only have one photo to work from, but as it was demolished around 1962 hopefully not too many people will tell me I've got the shape wrong.

Richard

Offline belstone

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #79 on: February 09, 2020, 04:05:55 PM »
Today is definitely a good day to stay indoors and make small things.  In this case, the waiting room on the Down platform at Stobs.  (The Up platform had no shelter at all.) 



My usual mixture of mounting card shell with overlays (printed brick paper this time to match the ticket office I built a while ago), a door left over from a plastic kit, and those lovely window frames.  They came with a Ratio signal box interior kit.  I only have one fuzzy photo of the waiting room to work from so I don't know what exactly the window frames at Stobs looked like, but these are very similar to the ones at Belses, a bit up the line.

Like the signal box it has lighting installed, but there won't be any interior to speak of, just a cast iron grate for the fire.  There were probably benches around the walls, but they wouldn't be visible through the windows so I won't bother.  I tend to only model the bits that people can see.  The roof has had a coat of varnish to seal it before I start the tedious job of sticking on strips of gummed paper slitted with a scalpel to represent slates.  The technique works well, but cutting the slits pretty quickly reminds me that I have arthritis in my left wrist.

The first signal came out reasonably well but I think I can do better, so I'll try another one this evening if the power stays on.  It's pretty wild out there and the lights keep flickering.  Normal weather for the Waverley Route I suppose.

Richard

Offline belstone

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #80 on: February 09, 2020, 09:11:42 PM »
A quick look at how I do slate roofs:



Drawn in 2D CAD and printed onto A4 self adhesive address label paper.  The idea is that each strip overlaps the one below it by half, creating a ridged effect.  The strips are cut horizontally with a scalpel, then the vertical lines between the "slates" scribed, again using the scalpel but with a not too sharp blade.  Strips are then cut to length and stuck to the roof, starting at the bottom.  The adhesive allows a bit of repositioning: once I am happy with the alignment they are pressed down firmly into place.



Once all the strips are in place the ends are trimmed.  I then use strips of folded address label paper for the corner cappings.  Finally the whole lot is painted grey, which seals the strips and cappings nicely so they don't peel off the roof.



A quick recap of the structures built so far.  None of them are quite finished, but all are I think recognisable for anyone familiar with the Waverley Route.  Still to come: station house (the last big structure), platelayers' hut (just north of the viaduct) and two bogus bridges to hide the scenic breaks.  Both will be based on actual examples:  I will be moving Colislinn road bridge a mile and a bit south of its actual location, and one of the four occupation bridges between Stobs and Shankend will be shifted a few hundred yards north. I don't want to mess around too much with the geography, but it's only a model as I keep reminding myself.

Richard


Offline belstone

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #81 on: February 12, 2020, 10:42:08 PM »
I finally have somewhere to rest my mugs of tea:



Two out of the four (or maybe six) boards now capable of standing up on their own.  I still have to add the raised trackbed to the scenic board and the 3 x 1 hinged extension to the loop board.  I'm starting to worry about that extension: it's nearly as big as the board itself and I don't think a diagonal strut will be enough support.  It's going to need legs.  But for now we have baseboards, so just admire my exquisite carpentry.  Thomas Chippendale would have been proud (if he'd been a ten-thumbed bodger who hated wood with a vengeance).





Even better, the things actually fold up for transport, just as I wanted.   



Bolting two boards together at right angles makes for a nice stable structure, although it shows up the need for adjustable feet.  Not much chance of this lot flexing enough to accommodate slightly uneven floors.  Overall I'm pretty happy so far although the beast is eating timber at a terrifying rate.  I'll need at least two more six packs of 2 x 1 before I'm done.

Weather forecast for the weekend looks unpromising for outdoor activities: I suspect I will be in the workshop wrestling with banana shaped lengths of splintery softwood.  Was timber always this rubbish or has it got worse lately?

Richard

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #82 on: February 13, 2020, 08:45:10 AM »
Weather forecast for the weekend looks unpromising for outdoor activities: I suspect I will be in the workshop wrestling with banana shaped lengths of splintery softwood.  Was timber always this rubbish or has it got worse lately?

In my experience, really good timber is available, albeit expensive2.  But I suspect that was always the case.  However, there is cheap, poor quality timber very readily available nowadays.  Sometimes it's fine for the job in hand and sometimes it isn't.  I understand that timber quality was one of the reasons why Barry Norman devised the 'plywood-with-spacers' beams that you have used to such good effect.

Many thanks for these fascinating updates and excellent pictures.

Best wishes.

John

'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

For the made-up background to the railway and list of characters, please see here: https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=38281.msg607991#msg607991

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #83 on: February 13, 2020, 11:01:16 AM »
Thomas Chippendale would have been proud (if he'd been a ten-thumbed bodger who hated wood with a vengeance).
I suspect I will be in the workshop wrestling with banana shaped lengths of splintery softwood.  Was timber always this rubbish or has it got worse lately?


First line is very self deprecating, Richard. It looks fine to this chap who can convert perfectly good timber into sawdust and scrapwood.
Second line - I've found timber from the DIY sheds to be pretty grim so tend to go to my local builders merchant. I pay a little extra but it's worth it for the better quality.

Offline dannyboy

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #84 on: February 13, 2020, 11:17:12 AM »
I finally have somewhere to rest my mugs of tea:


That is one strange coffee table!  ;)

As Mick said, timber from "DIY sheds" can be "pretty grim". Unfortunately, I do not have any nearby timber merchants, so have to spend ages looking for decent timber when I go to my local(ish) shed.
David.
I used to be indecisive - now I'm not - I don't think.
If a friend seems distant, catch up with him.

Offline belstone

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #85 on: February 13, 2020, 11:18:03 AM »
A random thought.  It might be a good idea to make up a short bridging section, maybe a foot long, so I can test all the storage loops without having to fit them to the scenic boards.  My local model shop is having a "Boxfile Challenge" with a prize for the best bit of railway modelling in a boxfile.  If I glue my boxfile to a short baseboard and cut holes at each ends, I can have a boxfile layout that accommodates ten coach trains  ;D Any suggestions for scenic treatment on a very short section of curved double track, in a boxfile?

Richard

Offline belstone

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #86 on: February 16, 2020, 02:39:02 PM »
The weather here in Norfolk wasn't bad enough to stop me driving up to the workshop for a few hours of bad carpentry.  I seem to have created a monster.



12 x 6 feet doesn't sound huge, but it's a lot bigger than anything else I have built.  I cut the trackbed roughly to shape just to see how it would look.



The layout now stands on adjustable rubber feet and is very stable and solid when all bolted together.  I was a bit worried that I might have overdone the height, but with the trackbed in place it looks about right for me.  I still have to fit the hinged extensions to the loop boards, then the backscene supports and protective covers.  I'm feeling a bit nervous about how easy these boards will be to handle at their "fully dressed" weight.  Basically it is going to take two people to transport, set up and dismantle the layout.  That is fine for shows, not so good if I have been working on the scenic section at home and need to get it to the workshop so I can run some trains.  This is starting to feel a bit like a club layout, but without the club.

I have a spare room at the workshop which is just used for storage as it gets far too hot in summer.  I might look at panelling out the roof with insulation board and putting blinds on the windows, to give the layout a semi-permanent home between shows.

Still in with a chance of starting track laying by the end of this month :)

Richard

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #87 on: February 16, 2020, 07:32:59 PM »
 :hellosign:  :greatpicturessign:
   Nice woodwork Richard look forward to more   :thumbsup:
        regards Derek.

Offline Roy L S

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #88 on: February 16, 2020, 07:47:01 PM »
Seconded. Lovely work and I keenly await further progress.

Roy

Offline belstone

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #89 on: February 16, 2020, 11:35:16 PM »
I just spotted that huge blowfly in the second photo.  It's February.  Where did that come from?

Richard

 

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