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Author Topic: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)  (Read 10297 times)

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Online maridunian

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #165 on: May 19, 2020, 09:40:54 AM »
That subtle curve looks great and very realistic - begs the question why most layouts have perfect straights at all!

Before retirement I was based in Edinburgh and drove down to a branch office in Galashiels every few weeks. The A7 tracks the Waverley route, which when I started in 2011 had no track at all. Over my 6 years in post the line was restored and before I retired I was able to let the train take the strain. I can confirm that the northern end of the route also has very few straight sections as much of it follows the "Gala water" valley.

Mike
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Offline Nbodger

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #166 on: May 19, 2020, 10:32:40 AM »
That subtle curve looks great and very realistic - begs the question why most layouts have perfect straights at all!

Mike

I agree, curved track makes a big difference to any layout.

Unless of course you are modelling the main line into Hull aside the banks of the Humber then it is straight track for miles

Stay Safe and well

Mike H  8)

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #167 on: May 19, 2020, 11:21:26 AM »
Up line through the station now lifted and realigned.  The track came away very easily using a scalpel blade under the sleepers: as with the real railway, the ballast will play an important role in keeping the track where it should be.



While the glue is drying, a taste of things to come:  a B1, 61184 of St Margarets, clanks across the viaduct with a Niddrie-Canal Class E freight. As the train heads through the station the exhaust of the B1 will gradually give way to the sharp bark of a J36 at the back which will bank the train to Whitrope.  V2s and Pacifics normally worked these trains single handed: the lesser B1s and K3s generally needed a banker. These transfer freights between Edinburgh and Carlisle were the lifeblood of the Waverley Route and I will have to build an awful lot of wagons.

Richard



That looks superb Richard, this is really going to be a layout to be proud of.

The freight is so typical of many pictures I have seen and I can just visualise my own sound fitted B1 echoing over the viaduct with J39 as banker making an equal amount of noise at the rear or the syncopated beat of A2 "Bachelors Button" pounding up the bank on its own!

Roy
« Last Edit: May 19, 2020, 11:22:54 AM by Roy L S »

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #168 on: May 19, 2020, 01:44:15 PM »

I agree, curved track makes a big difference to any layout.

Unless of course you are modelling the main line into Hull aside the banks of the Humber then it is straight track for miles

Stay Safe and well

Mike H  8)

18 miles between Selby and Hull. Tonbridge to Ashford is 24 nearly-straight miles.

Best Wishes

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1930s to the 1950s.

For the made-up background to the railway and list of characters, please see here: https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=38281.msg607991#msg607991

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #169 on: May 19, 2020, 10:25:08 PM »
Thank you everyone for your encouraging words. There's a very long way to go yet.  I suspect I will be spending this weekend wiring the two scenic boards - eight connectors of various kinds, seven busbars and assorted relay and control boards.  All for a section of plain double track with one siding.  I also have to make up various connecting cables (including some with "twisted pair" cables buried in them for the DCC handset sockets).  At that point, with luck, I will be able to run a locomotive over the viaduct.  After that, scenic contours.  Chicken wire and plaster-soaked bandages, or shaped polystyrene blocks?  I've never attempted landscaping on this scale before.

Richard


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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #170 on: May 20, 2020, 08:45:51 AM »
Most of the scenic work on 'Averingcliffe' was done by using shaped polystyrene with plaster bandage on top. Plaster bandage I found to be very therapeutic, if a bit messy! You could try both your methods on a bit of scrap board first to see which you prefer.
David.
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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #171 on: May 20, 2020, 08:55:53 AM »
Most of the scenic work on 'Averingcliffe' was done by using shaped polystyrene with plaster bandage on top. Plaster bandage I found to be very therapeutic, if a bit messy! You could try both your methods on a bit of scrap board first to see which you prefer.
I always think its really interesting that as modellers we find so many different ways to do so the same thing. Plaster bandage I tried many many years ago and I didnt like the reslts (but I agree its very therapueutic), ive also used expanded foam, packing polystyrene, toilet rolls,  ceiling tiles, ply wood, chicken wire etc etc. My preferred method now is to use woven card covered in kitchen towel soaked in pva as advocated by Tony Wright. Its just another method.
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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #172 on: May 23, 2020, 07:43:18 PM »
Another milestone today...



Having installed and wired up all the droppers, busbars, inter-board connectors and the feed socket from the DCC station I can finally run trains the full length of the layout.  Some very typical Waverley Route motive power here, with A1 Pacific 60162 "Saint Johnstoun" testing the Down line, and the still unfinished V2 (60882) and J36 (65331) just coming off the viaduct in the Up direction.  I had to tweak the check rails on the turnout slightly as 60162's driving wheels were catching: the part soldered, part glued construction makes minor adjustments fairly easy.  I have installed the actuating servos for the turnout and catch point although I don't yet have the control boards for them.

Next job is to put in the uncouplers, then I can ballast the track which should keep me out of mischief for the rest of the Bank Holiday.

Richard

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #173 on: May 23, 2020, 08:28:58 PM »
Another milestone

Congratulations on your milestone, it is always satisfying when you can get your trains running

Good luck with the ballasting

Mike H  8)

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #174 on: May 25, 2020, 11:10:01 AM »
Ballasting in progress: an area where (in my humble opinion) many promising N gauge layouts start to come a bit unstuck.  People copy what they see on today's railway: big chunky stones, deep ballasted up to the tops of the sleepers, with a visible "shoulder" of ballast either side.  That is not how railways, even main lines, were constructed in the steam era.  This photo from Disused Stations shows the appearance I am aiming for.  Not just the appearance but the actual bit of track!



So I am using fine sand for ballast, glued with a diabolical concoction of PVA glue, IPA, washing up liquid and water.  Don't ask me in what proportion: I just kept adding ingredients until I had something which flowed nicely through the sand and set solid.

I hate ballasting and always want to get it out of the ways as quickly as possible.  This means I always try to take short cuts and always end up regretting in.  It's a job I do so infrequently that I can never remember how I tackled it the last time.  This time I started by dumping sand over the track, using a shaped balsawood spreader to level it, then applying the glue.  Bad mistake.  The Finetrax code 40, like real track has a clear gap under the rails (unlike Peco): the sand accumulated in the gaps and I am now having to work my way along, picking out the unwanted sand with a bent fine pointed screwdriver.  This is likely to take some time, especially as I have ballasted about half the layout using this method.  In the photo below the Up line has been cleaned up as far as the screwdriver: the Down line has not yet been fettled.



Second attempt: for the section south of the viaduct I very carefully and sparingly sprinkled sand onto the track, then tapped the rail tops with a steel ruler, working slowly along, to shake the sand level.  I then went back, applied more sand to any holes which had appeared and repeated the process, only applying glue (from a small plastic bottle with a fine nozzle) when I was happy with the appearance.  This will need much less cleaning up but I am not sure the ballast is quite deep enough.  There is a bit too much sleeper showing and it may need another very fine layer of sand applying.



Once the track is ballasted it will need painting.  I have done a very short section at one end for test purposes, using dark grey emulsion from a B&Q tester pot.  I think the base colour is a little dark here: I might try a slightly lighter shade, then weather it using an airbrush to get the final effect I am looking for (using colour photos of the line for reference).  The section of track I have painted could do with a bit of infilling as there are holes under the rails: but at this stage it doesn't look too bad.



Richard


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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #175 on: May 25, 2020, 11:37:54 AM »
I agree completely with your observations on ballasting, Richard.  Having that photograph is certainly helpful.  I think your completed section of track looks wonderful.

Best wishes.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1930s to the 1950s.

For the made-up background to the railway and list of characters, please see here: https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=38281.msg607991#msg607991

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #176 on: May 25, 2020, 11:51:29 AM »
I'd also agree that we all rush this tedious job!

I feel its worth getting the rails and chairs a distinct colour from the ballast and sleepers so I've used these .

By all means  tone everything down a bit with a thin grey wash afterwards, but I find normal running with a steady accumulation of house dust takes care of that eventually!

Mike
« Last Edit: May 25, 2020, 11:56:53 AM by maridunian »
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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #177 on: May 25, 2020, 12:45:28 PM »
Yes agree ballasting is a very tedious job, that we all hate doing and rush so we can get on with the things we enjoy, but taking time and doing carefully can save a lot of later issues.

I too use sand as ballast, and I have recommended it to many, who many now take it as the norm.

Stay safe

Mike H  8)

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #178 on: May 25, 2020, 03:21:07 PM »
Lovely neat work Richard, it puts my own efforts to shame by comparison!

Roy

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Re: Stobs (Waverley Route, 1961)
« Reply #179 on: May 31, 2020, 02:51:19 PM »
A weekend of swings and roundabouts.  I have pretty much finished the ballasting, a couple of rough spots to tidy up and then I can start painting the railsides.  The turnout and catch point survived being glued and painted, the blades still move freely anyway.

So I got on with the electrics.  I built up the latest two MERG kits to arrive, another servo 4 board and the CANACC8 switching module.  I then finished off the DCC control / power centre, made up a 15 way connecting cable, fitted the bus sockets for the handsets, fired it up and found that everything appeared to work.  So I set about trying to program the CANACC8, the plan being to use it to switch a bank of relays so that I can control shunting operations at the station using the handset rather than having a separate control panel for the turnouts and uncoupler.

I tried following the procedure in the instructions but nothing seemed to be happening.  I tried again, and then noticed the distinctive smell of overheated electrics.  The control processor on the CANACC8 was red hot and the paper label on it was starting to go brown.  I quickly killed the power and set about finding what I had done wrong.  At first I thought I had wired the relays incorrectly and shorted the outputs on the module but they were fine.  The module was now dead anyway so I disconnected the 12 volt power input and carried on fiddling with other things.  A little while later I noticed that burning smell again...

Finally I realised what I had done wrong.  The socket boards for the control handset have four terminals marked CANL, CANH, + and 0.  CANL and CANH are the connections for the bus which allows the various modules to communicate with each other.  + and 0 are the 12 volt power supply for the handset itself.  The CANACC8 also has four terminals marked CANL, CANH, + and 0. Unfortunately the function of the + and 0 terminals is different: they are a 5 volt output rather than a 12 volt input.  So I accidentally backfed the CANACC8 with 12 volts through the processor rather than the 5 volts it is designed to take, and unsurprisingly it died.  Lesson learnt: always read the instructions even when something seems obvious.

Luckily my mistake didn't kill the handset or base station so I can still run trains.  Here is a recreation of the scene at Stobs on 1st April 1970: running "wrong line" D5307 heads south with an inspection saloon, on what turned out to be the last train south of Hawick before the demolition contractors started pulling up the track.



Richard

 

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