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Author Topic: Coniston  (Read 1402 times)

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Offline chrism

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Re: Coniston - Point Rodding plan A .... fail
« Reply #45 on: March 15, 2019, 02:49:27 PM »
so I can start on what is going to be my first real eye-straining task - the point rodding. I've seen some fantastic jobs done by other members, on Wrenton in particular.

However, I'm not too keen on using wire for the rods if I can avoid it, it just doesn't look right for inverted U-channel rods as used at Coniston. Also, on some I've seen which although they do look good, the wire used and/or the spacing appears somewhat over scale - particularly since I need to run 8 rods through the tight space  between the turntable and the adjacent track.

So, for my first try, I'm going to make the stools from 2mm x 1mm plastikard strips stood on plinths of more 2mm x 1mm with 0.3mm square plastikard rods on top of them, all topped off with a length of 0.2mm wire across the top to represent the upper rollers and tops of the stools. 0.3mm is, I think, still a bit over scale (about 50% too thick) for the rods but ought to be close enough and still workable with a strong pair of specs.

If that doesn't work or I deem it to be too flimsy or not looking right , then I'll use the 0.2mm wire for the rods as well.

Well, that plan was a failure - the 0.3mm square plastikard is just too fragile to survive the ministrations of my ham-fisted mitts, combined with my aging mincies. It is also far too easy to melt right through it with the solvent  :(
If it can't even survive construction I have little faith that it will survive life on a working, luggable, layout either - so it's on to plan B, or maybe that should be plan D.

I guess that plan B was to try the plastikard rod but using superglue instead, another failure, and plan C was to try gluing 0.3mm wire on top of the plastikard stools but that wasn't too successful either. In both cases the superglue did try to melt the plastic a bit.

I have some 0.2mm copper wire which I reckon works out pretty close to a scale 1", a little thicker after painting, which from memory is about right for prototype rodding.
The plan is to make a jig long enough for the length required for a run of the same number of rods, with rows of pins at each end around which I can stretch the required number of "rods" for that run. I'll then slip lengths of rail crosswise underneath the wires (think a guitar fretboard) so that I can solder the wires to the railhead. I'll probably need another jig, comprising pins at the same spacing, to act as a "comb" to ensure that the wire spacing is the same at the working point as it is at each end and, therefore, even throughout the run. Once each stool has been soldered to the wires I'll glue a short length of the 0.3mm wire across the top to represent the upper rollers.

When I have the entire run assembled I can (very carefully) remove it from the jig and transfer it to the layout, glueing each stool in place in turn.

I'll still be left with fiddly in-situ work to add the cranks, rods under the tracks and joins between the runs (where the number of rods changes) but I think it's got to be worth a try.



Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #46 on: March 15, 2019, 04:21:50 PM »
Your devotion to the modelling art is worthy of an award. With my shaky hands and squinty eyes I'm not even going to attempt any point rodding :no: :no:

Offline Train Waiting

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #47 on: March 15, 2019, 04:26:10 PM »
Marvellous stuff!

I don't know if this will help:



Lakeside, October 2018.

If it's of no interest, please let me know and I'll delete the post so that I'm not cluttering up your fascinating thread with my holiday snaps.

Best wishes.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

Offline chrism

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #48 on: March 15, 2019, 05:24:50 PM »
Your devotion to the modelling art is worthy of an award. With my shaky hands and squinty eyes I'm not even going to attempt any point rodding :no: :no:

I have an ulterior motive - it puts off having to do the ballasting  :D

Besides, if I don't have a go before my hands get too shaky and my eyes worse than what they are now, I'll never do it.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2019, 05:28:36 PM by chrism »

Offline chrism

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #49 on: March 15, 2019, 05:27:17 PM »
Marvellous stuff!

I don't know if this will help:
If it's of no interest, please let me know and I'll delete the post so that I'm not cluttering up your fascinating thread with my holiday snaps.

No, no, it's very useful thanks.

I presume that point is one of a crossover pair - since there's a rod going both ways from the crank.

Offline Train Waiting

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #50 on: March 15, 2019, 06:02:22 PM »
Marvellous stuff!

I don't know if this will help:
If it's of no interest, please let me know and I'll delete the post so that I'm not cluttering up your fascinating thread with my holiday snaps.

No, no, it's very useful thanks.

I presume that point is one of a crossover pair - since there's a rod going both ways from the crank.

Thank you very much.  Yes, the loco release crossover.  Worked by a ground frame released by the train staff as shown in another holiday snap (Mrs Train Waiting is very understanding):-



I'm really enjoying your thread; thank you.  I like the Coniston branch and the Furness generally.

All the best.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

 

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