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Author Topic: Coniston  (Read 11586 times)

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Offline chrism

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #135 on: April 20, 2019, 06:40:41 AM »
Thanks very much, all. I'm enjoying building this layout and your kind comments and encouragement add to to that enjoyment,

The issue of breed of sheep is interesting.  When I was building Portpatrick Town (now dismantled) , in its early stages c 2003, our holiday conveniently took in that corner of Scotland.  My wife observed that the cows were not all black and white Friesians.  Some were brown and white , so a plain buff colour.   I confirmed this by studying some DVDs which incorporated the routes to Stranraer.  So I repainted many of those I had bought to reflect this.  One of those small details it is worth getting right.

Oh definitely - up here they've simply got to be Herdwicks  :thumbsup:
Besides, with the two colourings of the older and younger sheep they stand out as not being "just" sheep.

Please don't take this as criticism - it's not - and it's not your fault anyway, but it's a shame Peco don't use rail instead of plastic for the guard rails on their points. Always been a letdown, I feel.
I think your protypically light coloured ballast may be just highlighting them in the photos. Nothing to lose sleep over.

It's coincidental that you say this - when editing the last photo for this update it was the first time I'd really noticed it myself. They do rather stand out, don't they?

I suspect the slightly harsh white overhead lighting may also be exacerbating the effect too. When I've got further along I'll have a play with lighting (and better photography) and see what that does.
It may also be more apparent on my layout than on others because of the number of points in Coniston, particularly the number closely grouped at the southern end of the station.

I guess that they don't use rail because that would undoubtedly bump up the cost - which with 19 of the things in Coniston would certainly have hurt my pocket.

I'll press on and if I feel that it does detract from the overall effect then I'll dig out the silver paint.

Offline Bealman

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #136 on: April 20, 2019, 06:50:25 AM »
I painted them rust-coloured on my layout, but I've never really been happy with them.

One must remember that the first Peco N gauge points appeared in the mid sixties, and apart from Electrofrog and the new Unipoint or whatever they're called, have remained much the same ever since!
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline crewearpley40

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #137 on: April 20, 2019, 06:57:02 AM »
Thank you for superb photos and commentary. Hope your new acquisitions and locos meet expectations and run well. The scenic modelling is inspiring

Offline crewearpley40

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #138 on: April 20, 2019, 07:10:18 AM »
How did you manage modelling the southern end of the station? With a closely grouped complex set of points must have been an interesting challenge for the real railway pway let alone you

Offline chrism

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #139 on: April 20, 2019, 07:43:28 AM »
How did you manage modelling the southern end of the station? With a closely grouped complex set of points must have been an interesting challenge for the real railway pway let alone you

It wasn't too bad actually - although it would have been easier if the Furness Railway (or the LMS during any rebuilding) had used Peco points instead of bespoke ones  :laugh3:

I scanned the layout plan from a book about the Coniston Railway and blew it up so that I could print it out full size at 2mm/ft scale - conveniently, the author had included a scale on the plan. That confirmed the baseboard size into which I could fit it so I then downloaded, printed and cut out all the Peco points plans and laid them over the plan to determine which would give the best fit and fiddled with them to get a decent alignment - and avoiding having points over baseboard joins or any tiebars over sub-base support beams. I also had to ensure that the baseboards would fit in the car so the length of each was restricted by that.

In general it all fitted very close to the plan, which did surprise me to be honest. IIRC the only real compromise that I had to make in the pointwork was shifting the point adjacent to the loco shed (which is the black area in the third of yesterday's pics) a bit further south than it should be.
There is a big compromise where the tracks curve away to the overbridge, though. They should be straight and the bridge much further away, but to do that I'd have never fitted it into either the spare bedroom nor the car. Ditto at the northern end where I had to tighten the curve out of the station to the copper/slate wharf line.

Having made the baseboards and bought the trackwork I then transposed the points only from the plan to the boards and rechecked the alignment before inserting the plain track - all Streamline, I did use a few bits of Setrack for parts of the curves around to the fiddle yard.

It was actually harder to lay out at the northern end, which comprised three long double radius points to combine platform roads 1,2 & 3 and the runround loop into a single line up to the copper/slate wharf. The nearest fit was the long Peco double radius points so that's what I used.

However, having done it all I found that I had an unpleasant looking reverse curve at the north end of platform 3 so settled for a less unpleasant straight in the sweeping curve around the runround loop and changed the point for the longest single radius one. The downside is that the runround loop is shorter than it ought to be but overall it's more pleasing to the eye.
 

Offline crewearpley40

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #140 on: April 20, 2019, 07:52:56 AM »
Wow thats a feat of civil and model engineering

Offline chrism

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #141 on: April 20, 2019, 08:20:15 AM »
Wow thats a feat of civil and model engineering

It was a bit of a challenge - especially considering that I'd not done any railway modelling at all for over 40 years and only in OO gauge then - but I don't mind a challenge. Given the choice I'd probably have done it in OO, but I don't have a 20' spare bedroom nor a really enormous car.
If I'd had any sense I'd have done Woodland or Torver - only five points each at those stations  :D

Unexpectedly, I've really warmed to N gauge - to the extent that I now think that OO gauge looks crude in comparison, despite the greater scope for fine detail.

Offline Bealman

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #142 on: April 20, 2019, 08:29:50 AM »
That's one thing NewportNobby and I have agreed on for years.  :thumbsup:

To me they look plasticy.
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Online Train Waiting

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #143 on: April 20, 2019, 08:31:23 AM »
Unexpectedly, I've really warmed to N gauge - to the extent that I now think that OO gauge looks crude in comparison, despite the greater scope for fine detail.

That happened to me as well.  Ten years ago in the middle of a house move, which involved a lot of building work*, I made a little four by two-and-a-half in 'N' gauge to keep me amused.  The new house has a lovely big train set room* with space for 'H0/00', 'P4' or even '0' if I was careful.  In it, at present, is a large but diminishing US-outline layout, Poppingham (4' x 2'3") and the Table-Top Railway Mark II (2'6" x 2').  All in 'N' gauge!

I don't know why; but I just like 'N'.  The other scale that I find particularly attractive is 'TT'.

Best wishes.

John

* Part of the building work was to have the Train Set Room!
« Last Edit: April 20, 2019, 08:34:31 AM by Train Waiting »
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

Offline crewearpley40

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #144 on: April 20, 2019, 07:01:45 PM »
looking forward to the next instalment

chris

Offline chrism

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #145 on: April 21, 2019, 12:01:41 PM »
looking forward to the next instalment

There will be one, but not until after a brief hiatus, caused by a combination of things - namely, that I've run out of flock and the replenishment order hasn't arrived yet, ditto the glue that I'm using for making the structures.
On top of that, my real foliage is calling to be planted out - which is actually handy because I need to get the greenhouse emptied ready for the tomatoes, cucumbers and melons that are coming on very well under the growlights - and I also see from the schedule that this week is slated down for sowing beans, carrots, parsnips, sweetcorn, courgettes and lettuces. I think trains will have to take a step back for a few days  :(

Offline crewearpley40

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #146 on: April 21, 2019, 06:51:20 PM »
good luck  with the gardening and the scenics, look forward to the fruits ( and veg ) of your scenics

Offline Black Sheep

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #147 on: April 24, 2019, 09:45:04 PM »
Excellent work,

Some people here were wondering when passenger services might start :D


Offline crewearpley40

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #148 on: April 24, 2019, 09:52:38 PM »
are you in   this period  photo ?

Offline Black Sheep

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Re: Coniston
« Reply #149 on: April 24, 2019, 09:56:30 PM »
are you in   this period  photo ?

No, it's from Swallows and Amazons which is set in the Lake District between 1923 and WW2 (as I understand it) Coniston water, Bowness and parts of Windermere are the main locations, the Coppermines valley just up from Coniston station also features.

If Chrism wishes me to remove the post (and this) I'm happy to do so.

 

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