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Author Topic: Soldering advice  (Read 4702 times)

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Online themadhippy

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Re: Soldering advice
« Reply #75 on: September 28, 2019, 04:39:08 PM »
Quote
Despite trying to clean the cold iron tip with fine glass paper
Not a good idea,tips are often coated,I'd try a new bit.let the iron get unto temperature apply  solder, wipe the tip of your jeans,attempt solder joint,apply solder to tip,wipe on jeans.One other problem could be  the iron is getting too hot so the flux is being burned of before it can do its thing.

Online dannyboy

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Re: Soldering advice
« Reply #76 on: September 28, 2019, 04:49:40 PM »
Another problem could be that you will end up with burn holes in your jeans.  ;D
David.
I used to be indecisive - now I'm not - I don't think.
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Online themadhippy

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Re: Soldering advice
« Reply #77 on: September 28, 2019, 05:09:26 PM »
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Another problem could be that you will end up with burn holes in your jeans
thats why you spit on em first

Offline bob lawrence

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Re: Soldering advice
« Reply #78 on: October 12, 2019, 06:05:30 PM »
Hi, just had a very frustrating session soldering. I have an Antex ER30 and am also having trouble getting solder to stick to the tip, I have decided to order some more. But in the meantime what are these tips made from? Is there a coating which is removed during cleaning? I have also been toying with the idea of using suitable diameter (4mm) copper rod turned to a point, would this be feasible? 

Offline stevewalker

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Re: Soldering advice
« Reply #79 on: October 13, 2019, 12:34:55 AM »
Without the coating, the solder will fairly rapidly eat away the copper.

With a fresh tip, get it hot, wipe on your jeans (they really do clean tips well and the iron doesn't stay still long enough for any harm) and tin with flux-cored, tin-lead solder. After that you've got a chance.

Offline Thebaz

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Re: Soldering advice
« Reply #80 on: December 11, 2019, 02:47:37 PM »
Hi, just had a very frustrating session soldering. I have an Antex ER30 and am also having trouble getting solder to stick to the tip, I have decided to order some more. But in the meantime what are these tips made from? Is there a coating which is removed during cleaning? I have also been toying with the idea of using suitable diameter (4mm) copper rod turned to a point, would this be feasible?

I've got one of these irons and am suffering the same problem - I cleaned the tip until it shone, turned power on for 5 or so minutes and then tried to tin the tip with my 63/37 solder. All I got was balls of shiny solder dropping to my table. I wonder if it's the iron? These ER30 ones seem a "bit" different to the other Antex designs. Anyway in trying to narrow down the problem I've ordered a small pot of flux and a new tip (only seem to be able to find one type of tip for this model.)

guest8097

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Re: Soldering advice
« Reply #81 on: April 30, 2020, 09:30:51 PM »
Soldering. It is a matter of practice. If your iron is too cold the solder will not flow and flux. You need a tip on your iron which is appropriate to the size of the job. Flat angled tips are best for soldering wires onto rails, bullet nosed tips are for circuit boards, too hot is better than too cold.but on circuit boards be very careful.because you can melt the board. Generally just touch for a second and watch the lead flux then cool. Leadless solder needs a higher temperature, and is risky on circuit boards. Irons are cheap, as are tips. keep them clean, and practice... when solder 'fluxes' it flows, and them sets in about a second. then you will have a good joint. always check with a meter that you don't have a 'dry joint.' Simples.. good luck xx

guest8097

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Re: Soldering advice
« Reply #82 on: April 30, 2020, 10:51:49 PM »
Soldering is not a 'black art'. it is mostly a matter of practice. If you understand the principle, then you will master the technique. I'm 70 years old, so what do I know?... well I know how to solder, Weld. Glue and chop and join wood.
Solder, now known as soldering wire, comes in various sizes. each are appropriate to the 'job' (i.e. the two elements that need to be joined.)
Soldering is Not WELDING, it is a process in which a third element (the 'solder') fluxes. or melts over the two elements, and forms a (weak) molecular bond, which will usually allow the passage of electrons. For over 80 years it has been a way of joining electrical components. It works if you do it right.. and there are a few 'rules' that if followed will make it work for you. In my humble but informed experience, these are:
1. Make sure that the two elements you wish to solder are 'super clean and shiny'. (all metals oxidise to some extent so however small scrape and shine the bits you want to join.)
2. 'Tinning' This is a process where you heat the object (such as a piece of wire, or track, and 'flux' (=flow) an amount of 'solder' onto it. NOT a great BLOB but an amount that is about 50% of the final job. If you do this on both elements, and then touch the iron on both together, a mutual flux takes place, and you get a good joint.
3. Temperature of your 'Iron'. This is where you can get caught out. You need an 'Iron' that is right for the job.
An Iron that is too cold..(or has too small a tip) is no good... an iron that is really HOT can be used, but be careful not to cook the components nor melt the circuit board if used. Buy a GOOD soldering iron, and if possible with a regulator 'soldering station' that allows you to fiddle with the temperature. KEEP your soldering tip CLEAN. (with a needle file between usages). Ask for advice before you buy...
4. Practice. Get hold of some old wire, and gash components, turn the radio on, relax between lunch and tea time, and practice soldering stuff together. It's great fun. You may even build a circuit!...
I  would especially recommend practice at soldering 24swg wire onto the OUTSIDE of N gauge track! extra prize if you don't melt the plastic sleepers or chairs!... good luck stay healthy and model!



 

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