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Author Topic: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)  (Read 21542 times)

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Online railsquid

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #555 on: July 19, 2019, 03:56:03 PM »
A while back we saw this very early Tomix ("Made by Bachmann in Hong Kong") ED75 Bo-Bo 20Kv AC loco:


Tomy ED75 (ED75 513) by Rail Squid, on Flickr

This is a successor model, made by Tomix in Japan, and a world apart in terms of quality:


Tomix ED75 (ED75-1015) by Rail Squid, on Flickr

I'm not exactly sure when this model was produced, probably mid-late 1980s. While it looks a lot better, compared to contemporary models, there's no attempt to even hint at the cab interior, which is walled off by a grey plastic part which conceals the lighting unit and chassis block. The tail lights are part of the main body moulding (Japanese N gauge locomotives rarely have working tail lights, but modern models at least have them as separate parts). Interestingly there's no attempt to represent the shunter grab handles, which in earlier models are usually done as vertical lines in the moulding, in modern models as separate parts; and there's no coupling release lever, but those didn't get modelled until much more recently.

Mechanism is Tomix's (infamous) worm gear drive, on this model noisy but not excessively so. Otherwise running quality is pretty good, despite the short wheelbase it runs smoothly over pointwork.

The (or a) previous owner seems to have weathered it slightly, but not attached any of the provided number plates, which I have rectified and given it the number EF75 1015; the prototype lasted in service until 2012, see e.g.:

http://photozou.jp/photo/show/1619862/118817925
« Last Edit: July 20, 2019, 02:30:03 AM by railsquid »
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #556 on: July 20, 2019, 12:00:41 AM »
Not just a world apart, light years!!  :thumbsup:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #557 on: July 20, 2019, 02:27:27 AM »
A couple of other features not present on more recent models are:
- seperate whistle / emergency smoke flare parts (both mounted on the cab roof at each end, on this model part of the main body moulding)
- glazing for the body side windows

Also the number plates are thicker, the ones on the side protude from the body; not really noticeable in the photo, but I had to check against other pictures of this model to be sure I hadn't made a mistake.

Meanwhile, back in the real world, this is Takao Station, the "Taka" in "Takahachikawa":


takao-station-2019-07-15a by Rail Squid, on Flickr


takao-station-2019-07-15c by Rail Squid, on Flickr


This is the western edge of the Kanto Plain, after that it's all hills, so is a natural terminus for Chuo Line suburban services. Some do continue west, including onto the private Fujikyu line down towards Mt Fuji, but mainly this is the transition point between suburban and regional trains.

The elevated line just visible on the left is part of the private Keio network.

View looking east, back towards Tokyo:


takao-station-2019-07-15b by Rail Squid, on Flickr

The two trains in the platform are Chuo Line E233s, which we have seen previously; on the right you can see a 211 series in a holding siding, these run on the regional stopping services west of Tokyo through the mountains (they took over from the 115 series a few years ago). To the right of that you can see a Keio line train.

This is very typical of Japan, fairly dense urban area sweeping right up to the edge of the hills, go one station beyond and it's another, much quieter world mainly full of trees on steep slopes.


(Sorry about the rather dull grey photos, it's been a protracted rainy season and cloudy every day for the last month)
« Last Edit: July 20, 2019, 02:36:24 AM by railsquid »
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #558 on: July 20, 2019, 03:42:04 PM »
Continuing the odyssey through the collection of ED75s, we jump forward in model production time to 1992, where we find this version by Kato:


Kato ED75 (ED75-89) by Rail Squid, on Flickr

It is a different subclass to the Tomix one seen previously, so the cab front looks slightly different. It is almost a sister locomotive to the Eidai model (produced ca. 1979):


Eidai ED75 (ED75 91) by Rail Squid, on Flickr

In terms of body detailing quality, the two are not that far apart (as mentioned, the Eidai one was quite advanced for the time). The Kato one has sharper detail on the roof and the "skirt" (what in UK parlance would be the buffer beam, except Japanese locomotives don't have buffers). It also has an attempt at a cab interior, unlike the previous models shown. The cab window surrounds by contrast are somewhat lacking, the Tomix version does them much better.

The main difference to all previous models is the mechanism, which features Kato's double-flywheel motor, introduced in the very early 90s, and is a nice smooth quiet runner.

Unfortunately the number plates had become very brittle and half of them snapped off the sprue by accident, breaking tiny bits off the plates themselves.
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #559 on: July 20, 2019, 06:35:00 PM »
Hi railsquid,

That's a bit spooky about the buffers because I mentioned before about possibly having Japanese (to be Rule 1) DMUs/EMUs/locos on my Spanish track in Izaro as RENFE have Mitsubishi locos and was going to ask you about a 2 car add on DMU set I bought on ebay years ago.

Mainly the question was going to be what year was it in real life and what is it (besides being Kato) in case I bought the powered set. I noticed yesterday that it didn't have any buffers and I presumed they had broken off. Annoyed, I didn't bother to take pic but in a possible new light I will do so after dinner.

Speak soon,

Cheers weave  :beers:

PS Great pics as usual.


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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #560 on: July 20, 2019, 10:46:38 PM »
 :hellosign:   :greatpicturessign:
   Thanks Ian following with great interest   :thumbsup:
         regards Derek.

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #561 on: July 20, 2019, 11:57:04 PM »
Hi Ian,

Sorry to hijack you again but here are some pics of the DMU......

20190720_225114 by Christopher Weaver, on Flickr


20190720_225137 by Christopher Weaver, on Flickr


20190720_225202 by Christopher Weaver, on Flickr


I like the colours as thought they could be older Spanishy type livery in my semi fantasy world but as I said, if you knew when they appeared and what it is ie. classification to look up on a Kato site that would be fantastic.

Cheers weave  :beers:

PS Meant to ask, do DMUs not have buffers either?

« Last Edit: July 20, 2019, 11:59:30 PM by weave »

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #562 on: July 21, 2019, 12:57:43 AM »
PS Meant to ask, do DMUs not have buffers either?

Once upon a time Japanese locomotives and rolling stock did indeed come fitted with buffers and chain link couplings, such as the previously seen Locomotive Number 1:



MicroAce Class E ( by Rail Squid, on Flickr

as per British practice, but it was decided they were impractical for various reasons, and over a few days in July 1925 swapped them all out (on every single locomotive, coach and wagon) for automatic couplers (mainly variant(s) of the Janney coupler), which among various advantages removes the need for buffers.

20190720_225202 by Christopher Weaver, on Flickr


I like the colours as thought they could be older Spanishy type livery in my semi fantasy world but as I said, if you knew when they appeared and what it is ie. classification to look up on a Kato site that would be fantastic.

Cheers weave  :beers:

Hate to break it to you, but this is actually an EMU, more specifically the pantograph-less driving trailers of a (most likekly) a 165 series like this:


Kato 165-800 series by Rail Squid, on Flickr

The numbers on the side are not legible in the photos but they should be "クハ" or "クモハ" 164-something or 165-something.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2019, 01:29:32 AM by railsquid »
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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #563 on: July 21, 2019, 01:07:05 AM »
You know, all those three weeks over there, I never noticed the lack of buffers!  :-[
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #564 on: July 21, 2019, 02:24:50 AM »
I must admit, I never really thought about it until I started with N gauge, and noticed the lack of them being there to break off, lock up on tight corners etc.

While we're at it, the 165 series was an EMU designed for express services. It look similar to the 115 EMUs previously seen, but only has narrower doors at the ends of each car.

They were the mainstay of intercity express services on the Chuo Line after electrification, most famously the "Alps" service between Shinjuku (Tokyo) and Matsumoto.

Here is my Kato model with the "Alps" headboard added:


Kato 165 series by Rail Squid, on Flickr


Kato 165-800 series by Rail Squid, on Flickr

This model is "classic" Kato tooling, not exactly sure from when it dates, possibly late 1970s? Each car will have a 3-digit number on the chassis, which is a sure sign of earlier Kato. The model itself was in production until quite recently; it has since been replaced by a more up-to-date version.

The old model (available by the bucketload for cheap as chips) is nevertheless quite passable, especially if upgraded a bit, e.g. by replacing the wheelsets, adding close couplings, and retrofitting corridor connectors:


kato-165-series-corridor_01 by Rail Squid, on Flickr


kato-165-series-corridor_02 by Rail Squid, on Flickr
« Last Edit: July 21, 2019, 02:26:22 AM by railsquid »
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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #565 on: July 21, 2019, 06:22:24 AM »
I think that's a very passable model for it's age. The corridor connections are a definite improvement.

By the way, Hello Kitty is now Goodbye Kitty in the local shopping mall. She (He?) has been replaced with this rather boring looking thing:



Kitty didn't last long!  ::)
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #566 on: July 21, 2019, 06:35:22 AM »
There is hope for Antipodean civilisation  yet...
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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #567 on: July 21, 2019, 09:03:00 AM »
I like the colours as thought they could be older Spanishy type livery in my semi fantasy world but as I said, if you knew when they appeared and what it is ie. classification to look up on a Kato site that would be fantastic.

The livery reminds me of the Great Northern Railway (the US one!) before it went all 'Big Sky Blue' in the 'sixties.

Thank you, Gentlemen, for these super photographs.

Best Wishes.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #568 on: July 22, 2019, 03:21:22 AM »
That livery is known as the "Shonan" livery, as it was first applied in the 1950s to the (then) fancy new trains running on the Tokaido line between Tokyo and the Shonan area (coastal/resort area centred around Kamakura).

For a long time it was the default livery for DC multiple units, and survives (in abbreviated form) on the Tokaido line even today.

Meanwhile, ooh a video!



Direct link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=skp4guHtQQw

As I was messing around with the camera recently, and needed to edit some other videos anyway.

« Last Edit: July 22, 2019, 06:38:01 AM by railsquid »
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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #569 on: July 22, 2019, 03:56:12 AM »
Good video!  :thumbsup:

The Apollo ones after it are pretty cool too!  ;)
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

 

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