!!

Not Registered?

Welcome!  Please register to view all of the new posts and forum boards - some of which are hidden to guests.  After registering and gaining 10 posts you will be able to sell and buy items on our N'porium.

If you have any problems registering, then please check your spam filter before emailing us.  Hotmail users seem to find their emails in the Junk folder.


Thanks for reading,
The NGF Staff.

Author Topic: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)  (Read 26351 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Online railsquid

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 25547
  • Posts: 5461
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • My model railway website
    • Awards
Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #540 on: July 12, 2019, 09:13:03 AM »
I tried a few of the old Speccy games in an emulator a while back and was amazed to find I could still remember most of the keys and movements without thinking about it.

Meanwhile, a brown study:


left-scenic-area-2019-07-12_02 by Rail Squid, on Flickr[/i]
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

Birmingham Knotmore Street - (ex) GWR mainline through the Midlands

Online railsquid

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 25547
  • Posts: 5461
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • My model railway website
    • Awards
Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #541 on: July 12, 2019, 02:05:53 PM »
View along the layout now looks like this:


left-scenic-area-2019-07-12_04 by Rail Squid, on Flickr

Excuse the East German interlopers on the left.

On the right, a train I believe we have not seen before.
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

Birmingham Knotmore Street - (ex) GWR mainline through the Midlands

Offline Bealman

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23151
  • Posts: 17465
  • Country: au
  • Gender: Male
  • Promotion remains in the future
    • Awards
Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #542 on: July 12, 2019, 02:10:01 PM »
I'm too busy looking at the angle of that ryokan/onsen on top of the hill which for sure would be the one Mrs Bealman would want to go to  :worried:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Online railsquid

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 25547
  • Posts: 5461
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • My model railway website
    • Awards
Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #543 on: July 12, 2019, 02:12:37 PM »
I'm sure structural rectification work will be carried out before it opens to tourists.
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

Birmingham Knotmore Street - (ex) GWR mainline through the Midlands

Offline Train Waiting

  • Larger Gallery
  • Trade Count: (+4)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2676
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • The Table-Top Railway.
    • Awards
Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #544 on: July 12, 2019, 02:52:46 PM »
...Meanwhile, a brown study...

"I [Dr Watson] fell into a brown study."

Can't remember which short story.  One of the early ones, I think.

Great pictures; thank you.

Best wishes.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

Online railsquid

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 25547
  • Posts: 5461
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • My model railway website
    • Awards
Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #545 on: July 12, 2019, 02:58:46 PM »
Meanwhile, about that new train:


Tomytec Minobu Line train by Rail Squid, on Flickr

Assiduous takers of notes can be forgiven for speculating that it might be a variant of the 115 series, which we have seen several times previously.

For it looks very much like a 115 series, but is in fact one of these in disguise:


Tomix 72/73 series by Rail Squid, on Flickr


"One of these" being a 72 series EMU, which is a late wartime austerity design, heavily modified post-war as they were made out of whatever was available and were literally death traps in their original form (63 series). That class has a long and complex history which we can touch upon at a later point in time (or points in time, believe me it is long and complex), but anyway, during the later 1970s JNR, like many nationalised railway companies, was suffering from the usual fundamental shifts of traffic away from rail and onto the roads and into the air, and was a bit short of cash, but at the same time really needed to present some slightly less decrepit stock to the passengers still left, and hit upon the wizard wheeze of taking some old but strill serviceable stock and slapping shiny new bodies on the chassis (I believe the British Rail Southern Region and predecessors did that kind of thing too), resulting in this modern-looking 62 series.

However the improved passenger accommodation didn't help with the below-floor whiney-movey bits, which were approaching the end of their service life, and these lasted less than a decade in service before being replaced by the 115-2000 series previously seen.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2019, 02:25:55 AM by railsquid »
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

Birmingham Knotmore Street - (ex) GWR mainline through the Midlands

Offline cornish yorkie

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2689
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #546 on: July 12, 2019, 03:22:51 PM »
 :hellosign:  :greatpicturessign:
  Thanks Ian, another most interesting & informative update.  :thumbsup:
   regards Derek

Online railsquid

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 25547
  • Posts: 5461
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • My model railway website
    • Awards
Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #547 on: July 15, 2019, 02:36:06 AM »
We recently saw an example of a retro brown livery - here's another one:


Tomix DE10 (DE10 1705) by Rail Squid, on Flickr


This is a DE10, which astute takers of notes will recognise as a diesel (in this case diesel-hydraulic) with 5 (five) powered axles, in this case Co-Bo. 700+ examples were built, as a light mixed-usage class, everything from shunting to trip freight working to branch line trains. Quite a few are still around as they are Really Useful Little Locos.

This model represents DE10 1705, which was repainted in 1988 (just after the privatization of JNR) into this retro-fictitious JNR brown livery (along with a couple of other locos), and has run about like that ever since, though apparently it was out of service at one point for a few years. Here it is in 2016:



(Youtube direct link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOjV0RXt0ME )

This model is by Tomix and was a very cheap auction sub-acquisition, as I was after something else but this one was also available from the same bidder at a low starting price with no bids. Unfortunately the very shiny as-new state caused me to assume it was a more recent model, but it turned out to be from 1988 or thereabouts too, and has Tomix's infamous "spring worm" drive mechanism which is fundamentally noisy. Some fettling (well basically dumping a large amount of grease into the spring worm shaft) has quietened it down from "painfully noisy" to merely "quite noisy". Otherwise a very reliable runner and will make a good "layout loco".
« Last Edit: July 15, 2019, 04:31:11 AM by railsquid »
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

Birmingham Knotmore Street - (ex) GWR mainline through the Midlands

Offline Train Waiting

  • Larger Gallery
  • Trade Count: (+4)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2676
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • The Table-Top Railway.
    • Awards
Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #548 on: July 15, 2019, 09:01:43 AM »
a diesel (in this case diesel-hydraulic) with 5 (five) powered axles, in this case Co-Bo. 700+ examples were built, as a light mixed-usage class, everything from shunting to trip freight working to branch line trains. Quite a few are still around as they are Really Useful Little Locos...

Clearly vastly more successful than the British effort at the same axle arrangement, albeit diesel-electric.  I'm guessing the heavy bits are below the long bonnet and the three axle bogie evens out axle loading and also keeps overall axle loading below a specified figure.

Best wishes.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

Online railsquid

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 25547
  • Posts: 5461
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • My model railway website
    • Awards
Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #549 on: July 15, 2019, 12:43:07 PM »
a diesel (in this case diesel-hydraulic) with 5 (five) powered axles, in this case Co-Bo. 700+ examples were built, as a light mixed-usage class, everything from shunting to trip freight working to branch line trains. Quite a few are still around as they are Really Useful Little Locos...

I'm guessing the heavy bits are below the long bonnet and the three axle bogie evens out axle loading and also keeps overall axle loading below a specified figure.

Indeed, makes it able to serve a wider selection of lines. There are quite a few classes with "odd" wheel arrangements for similar reasons (e.g. Bo-1-Bo and Bo-2-Bo), though I suspect it's less of an issue these days as many lines will have been upgraded (and/or are simply not server by loco-hauled traffic any more :( ).

We will, at some point, see some examples related to the above directly relevant to Takahachikawa (watch this space and all that).

Clearly vastly more successful than the British effort at the same axle arrangement, albeit diesel-electric.

Japan also had at least one early diesel class which turned out to be a dud, not local to the Takahachikawa area but I have one floating around somewhere in the Box, one day its turn will come.
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

Birmingham Knotmore Street - (ex) GWR mainline through the Midlands

Online railsquid

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 25547
  • Posts: 5461
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • My model railway website
    • Awards
Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #550 on: July 16, 2019, 03:10:07 PM »
In today's episode, we stay with the "brown" theme (but with some freight for a change) this time rummaging in the box for the genuine article:


Kato ED16 (ED16-3) by Rail Squid, on Flickr

This is an ED16 by Kato, you will of course by now recognise it as an electric loco (the pantographs on the roof are a dead giveaway) with four powered axles, and two leading (trailing) axles making it 2-Bo-Bo-2.
As is so often the case with Japanese "RTR" models, "some self-assembly required":


Kato ED16 (ED16-3) by Rail Squid, on Flickr

With this one it's just a case of choosing and fitting the number and maker plates:


Kato ED16 (ED16-3) by Rail Squid, on Flickr

so was fairly straightforward for a change (in more extreme cases one ends up getting the pin vise out and drilling holes into the roof), with the plates being a nice push-fit (no glue required).

Side note, as the subject of cutting mats came up on another thread:  this is my No. 3 mat, the newest one reserved exclusively for working on the actual trains.

Now, why do I "need" this particular loco? Well the class of 18 was strongly associated with the Chuo Line in the Tokyo area for most of their working lives, which were quite long, as the class was produced in the mid 1930s and only finally retired in 1984. @Bealman may be interested to know they are a smaller variant of the EF52 in the Kyoto museum.

The main reason for their longevity was the Ōme Line, which is effectively a branch line of the Chuo Line snaking up into the mountains west of Tokyo, at the end of which was (and possibly still is) a limestone quarry, and as a long snaking mountainous branch line with low axle load limits, these locomotives were hard to replace, until the line was finally upgraded to be able to take more modern, heavier ones.

The wagons, in case anyone is interested, are these:


MicroAce HoKi 2500 by Rail Squid, on Flickr


constructed in the 1960s and which lasted in service until the end of freight operations on the Ōme Line in 1998. I am pretty sure I remember seeing these wagons still running, back when I was a student.

Happily the latter days of ED16 working came about around the time consumer video cameras became available, so there's a bit of footage available like this:



direct link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8BuaGs_uOPs
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

Birmingham Knotmore Street - (ex) GWR mainline through the Midlands

Offline Bealman

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23151
  • Posts: 17465
  • Country: au
  • Gender: Male
  • Promotion remains in the future
    • Awards
Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #551 on: July 16, 2019, 11:59:08 PM »
They're nice shots in that video. The photographer seemed to know what they were doing.

Good to see the Japanese equivalent of a guard's van on the end of each train.
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Online railsquid

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 25547
  • Posts: 5461
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • My model railway website
    • Awards
Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #552 on: July 17, 2019, 02:20:20 PM »
Ah yes, guard's vans. Just like in the UK, they were common until the mid-1980s then disappeared quickly, apart from for special uses.

Meanwhile, running light-loco we see another Blast from the Brown Past, this time one of the early "modern" locos, an ED61:


Tomix ED61 (ED61-11) by Rail Squid, on Flickr

Freshly out of the "applying the fiddly bits" workshop, only 2 fiddly bits lost to posterity (fortunately Tomix provides spares).

Well you know the drill, it's electric and has 4 powered axles, and being a "modern" one is bereft of unpowered axles (at this point in their history at least) so is a Bo-Bo.

This class of 18 was built in 1958/1959 specifically for freight services on the Chuo Line and were designed with regenerative braking, which however wasn't too successful. Often working in pairs, they lasted until the mid 1970s when they were transferred to the Iida Line, for which they were rebuilt as class ED62 and received an additional non-powered axle in the middle for weight reasons.

I have yet to find colour pictures of these in their original brown livery (they were later repainted to blue). Last picture on this page shows one in splendid black-and-white:

http://home.a00.itscom.net/yosan/densya/omiya/newpage2.html

You can tell it's brown because the blue ones have a brighter "warning panel" on the cab ends.
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

Birmingham Knotmore Street - (ex) GWR mainline through the Midlands

Offline DarrwestLU6

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 28089
  • Posts: 350
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • Getting back into N after a long break!
    • Awards
Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #553 on: July 17, 2019, 10:58:02 PM »

Here's the result:



The Japanese text at the top of the image reads "Kiha 40 painting" - which even in translation doesn't mean anything to me yet - @Railsquid san - explain!

I think it is reminiscent of Sponge Bob Square Pants the cartoon but that might be just me....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nj-M0qIB8Vw
« Last Edit: July 19, 2019, 06:21:37 PM by Railwaygun, Reason: Url added »

Online railsquid

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 25547
  • Posts: 5461
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • My model railway website
    • Awards
Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #554 on: July 17, 2019, 11:27:06 PM »

Here's the result:



The Japanese text at the top of the image reads "Kiha 40 painting" - which even in translation doesn't mean anything to me yet - @Railsquid san - explain!

"Kiha 40" is the type of train, and "ペインティング車" is "painted train", which denotes a train in a special livery like this.
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

Birmingham Knotmore Street - (ex) GWR mainline through the Midlands

 

Please Support Us!
December Goal: £60.00
Due Date: Dec 31
Total Receipts: £35.00
Below Goal: £25.00
Site Currency: GBP
58% 
December Donations


Advertise Here