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Author Topic: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)  (Read 14428 times)

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Offline Bealman

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #435 on: June 19, 2019, 11:54:49 PM »
Totally spoiled them when they painted 'em blue  >:(
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #436 on: June 20, 2019, 08:22:45 AM »
Totally spoiled them when they painted 'em blue  >:(

That's a very interesting point, George.  I agree completely (although I only ever saw blue ones in BR service).

To me, and I happily acknowledge that it is purely a personal preference, the slippery slope commenced with the small warning panel and got steeper and more slippery thereafter.  Although the 'Western' class in green with a small yellow panel looks good... but not as good as a 'Castle'!

Best wishes.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

Offline railsquid

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #437 on: June 20, 2019, 09:03:47 AM »
Having grown up in the BR Blue era, I must say the green liveries are nicer, *but* the blue ones are more "real" to me, if you see what I mean.
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

Birmingham Knotmore Street - (ex) GWR mainline through the Midlands

Offline railsquid

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #438 on: June 20, 2019, 03:44:43 PM »
Anyway enough of this green and blue nonsense, time for a bit of red:


Microace 413/455 series by Rail Squid, on Flickr

This is a 3-car 413 series AC/DC EMU built ca. 1986 using the better bits of older EMUs which were in dire need of replacement for service on the Hokuriku Main Line on the northern coast of Honshu (the other side of the island from Tokyo etc.).

You can tell it's AC-compatible by all the gubbins on the roof around the pantograph:


Microace 413/455 series by Rail Squid, on Flickr

DC-only units have much less in the way of electrickery bits there.

If you look carefully, the car on the left has a different door arrangement - that's because it's actually a 455 series intermediate trailer car converted into a driving car, the 455 series being one of the older EMU series in need of replacement, but a couple of younger ones were deemed to be in sufficiently good condition for conversion, rather than constructing a completely "new" car.

This unit is completely outside the layout's Chuo Line, 1500V DC remit, but it was an early random purchase and it ticks the box "Frankenstein mixed-formation train made out of bits of other trains" so I will keep it around.

Incredibly this unit is still in existence, albeit in a slightly different colour scheme:

Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

Birmingham Knotmore Street - (ex) GWR mainline through the Midlands

Offline Bealman

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #439 on: June 20, 2019, 11:00:08 PM »
Have you ever considered a job as an educator, Ian? Cos you're sure as hell educating me!  :thumbsup: :beers:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #440 on: June 21, 2019, 08:22:36 AM »
Have you ever considered a job as an educator, Ian? Cos you're sure as hell educating me!  :thumbsup: :beers:

And me!

Thank you. 

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #441 on: June 21, 2019, 03:22:44 PM »
Well then, ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, gather round the internet for the next exciting installment of Railsquid's Obscure Japanese Trains:


Kato 115-2000 series (Minobu Line) by Rail Squid, on Flickr

What's that, you say? It's the same one as yesterday? Most certainly not. Pay attention and count the number of passenger doors on each side, please. That's right - 3 sets of doors, whereas yesterday's train only had two sets.

That's because this is a 115 series (2000 subclass), one variant of a fairly standard JNR design of EMU mainly for outer urban/regional stopping services on main/main-ish lines, so in contrast to urban commuter stock has 3 instead of 4 sets of doors, slightly more comfortable seating and toilet facilities.

This set was built in 1981 for the Minobu Line, located a fair way to the west of Tokyo "behind" Mt. Fuji, and which links the Tokaido main line to the Chuo line (hence my interest).

Now, if you were paying attention yesterday, you'll be able to tell whether it's an AC unit, or DC only:


Kato 115-2000 series (Minobu Line) by Rail Squid, on Flickr

Answers on the back of a 10,000 yen note addressed to Railsquid, Railsquid Mansion, Tokyo, Japan.

Additional totally useless fact: when running as 4-car units, an additional cab unit was placed in the centre of the formation to provide additional guard accommodation, don't quote me on this but it may to cope with platforms shorter than the train.


Kato 115-2000 series (Minobu Line) by Rail Squid, on Flickr


These vanished from service somewhat before the advent of universally available portable video recording, so are somewhat sparsely represented on YouTube, but here's a 3-car set:




Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mlDUJtxWHRE
« Last Edit: June 22, 2019, 02:30:57 AM by railsquid »
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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #442 on: June 21, 2019, 06:41:26 PM »
Please Sir; runs on DC only.

Just like Poppingham!

I wonder how much 10,000 Yen is in Pounds...

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

Offline Bealman

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #443 on: June 21, 2019, 11:50:21 PM »
73 pounds 15 pence
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #444 on: June 22, 2019, 01:31:32 AM »
Please Sir; runs on DC only.

Just like Poppingham!

But not 1500v DC, I wager.


I wonder how much 10,000 Yen is in Pounds...

73 pounds 15 pence

Correct, or approximately one Union Mills steam locomotive. Congratulations, you have won today's prize, a special commemorative set of Lima wheelsets (today's second prize is two special commemorative sets of Lima wheelsets).

From a modelling perspective, the 115 series is by Kato, I can't be bothered to look up when this set was made, but the tooling/design is fairly typical of the period ca. 1985 - 2005, i.e. it's a decent model and a vast improvement over earlier models, with features such as properly inset windows, motor mounted below window height, generally improved detail and paintwork, but not quite up to the standards of current production. They are however very good value for money and a few simple improvements can make a difference, in particular in the area between cars, which is wide enough to jump a motorbike through if you get the timing right (tricky if the train is moving, so don't try this at home):


Kato 115 series (old-style) original by Rail Squid, on Flickr

Replacing the rapido couplings with Kato "Scharfenberg"-style close(r) couplings reduces the gap, while adding corridor connectors fills most of the rest:


Kato 115 series (old-style) modified by Rail Squid, on Flickr

The corridor connectors are available in copious amounts as spare parts, they're designed to clip in place, but these older trains don't have the necessary slots (and it's not feasible to add them) so the clips need to be removed like this:


kato-z06-0227-horo_02 by Rail Squid, on Flickr


and the corridor connectors glued in place; I use a PVA-like glue available in Japan which is actually intended for wood, but I find it much easier to work with than glues intended for plastic, as it's easy to remove without damaging the body if it gets in the wrong place, but it is firm enough to hold the connectors in place; example from a different train:


kato-165-series-corridor-attachment_01 by Rail Squid, on Flickr


kato-165-series-corridor-attachment_02 by Rail Squid, on Flickr

Anyway after all that technical detail, here's a nice older (ca. 1979) film of the aforementioned Minobu Line, which used to be home to an attractive variety of older trains cascaded down from more prosoperous lines, and at the end you can even see an English Electric locomotive:



Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxYXYcVOetw
« Last Edit: June 22, 2019, 02:30:29 AM by railsquid »
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

Birmingham Knotmore Street - (ex) GWR mainline through the Midlands

Offline Bealman

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #445 on: June 22, 2019, 02:19:56 AM »
I'm afraid the last two vids don't show on my phone  :hmmm:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #446 on: June 22, 2019, 02:32:39 AM »
I'm afraid the last two vids don't show on my phone  :hmmm:

They look fine on both my computers.

No idea what the correct incantation is for mobile display; I added the direct Youtube link...
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

Birmingham Knotmore Street - (ex) GWR mainline through the Midlands

Offline Graham

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #447 on: June 22, 2019, 03:04:18 AM »
Hi Ian, the vids did not show for me either, on Win10 pc running Edge browser. Link worked fine.
cheers
Graham

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #448 on: June 22, 2019, 03:42:01 AM »
Yeah, the links work, thanks! The vids show on my tablet, so they probably will on me laptop too.

I like the old 8mm film!
« Last Edit: June 22, 2019, 03:48:35 AM by Bealman »
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Takahachikawa (Japanese layout)
« Reply #449 on: June 22, 2019, 07:56:49 AM »
So, fast-forwarding a century or so, the rake of excitingly brown coaches would, towards the end of its life, have been hauled by a locomotive in a colour neither brown nor black, specifically an EF64:

MicroAce EF64 (EF64-42) by Rail Squid, on Flickr

If you refer to your notes you will recall "E" is for "Electric" and "F" for 6 powered axles. The EF64 (as with all electric locos with a class number of 60 or later) is a post-war "second-generation" design, i.e. an oblong box without the leading unpowered trucks typical of "first generation" designs, and unsurprisingly it has the wheel arrangement Bo-Bo-Bo (as probably mentioned previously, Co-Co is also available, but rare). Around the same time someone at JNR (Japanese National Railways) discovered the concept of paint which is neither brown nor black, and for whatever reason (apart from very early examples) the second generation locomotives generally came in blue (1500v DC) or red (DC/AC or AC-only), a tradition which continues in principle to the present day, albeit with many exceptions. (Diesels, when not brown, were/are usually a red/orange colour, but Japan went largely from steam to electric traction with diesels playing only a secondary role).

Unfortunately this locomotive as depicted is only a placeholder, for it bears the post-privatisation "JR" logo (and is also fitted with a train radio antenna, the stubby grey thing on the right of the cab roof, which puts it at some time in the 1980s) so is not prototypical for the carriages depicted, which lasted in some form until ca. 1975, so I am considering what options are available to obtain an early EF64 in prototypical form, as the options are suprisingly limited (Kato, who make the coaches, helpfully point out that an early EF64 version would be appropriate, but unhelpfully fail to actually make one; MicroAce do, but it is of an older model generation than the one depicted so not as well detailed).

And here it is, and my wallet GBP20 or so lighter:


MicroAce EF64 (EF64-3) by Rail Squid, on Flickr

The model is 18 years old and by the sounds of the occasional screech will need stripping down and lubricating in all the right places, which is likely to be fiddly as I think this is a split-chassis design.
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

Birmingham Knotmore Street - (ex) GWR mainline through the Midlands

 

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