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Author Topic: 3D printed chassis experiment  (Read 10732 times)

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Offline kirky

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Re: 3D printed chassis experiment
« Reply #15 on: February 16, 2012, 07:56:02 AM »
The motor bogie has arrived. It's assembled and can sort of drive. Various small adjustments and thinkos need fixing to make it useful but it sort of proves the concept. Rev3 adjusts some clearances and adds a needed bearing at the non motor end to stop the shaft jumping over the worm.

And yes.. that's a NEM pocket as an experiment !



Hi Alan
Looks good.
Is there a worm on both axles?
And if you say had to shave a bit of this material down to get the body on, or fit a chip in, does it shave away easily?

Cheers
Kirky
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Offline EtchedPixels

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Re: 3D printed chassis experiment
« Reply #16 on: February 16, 2012, 12:13:21 PM »
Both axles are driven by worms off the drive shaft.

The WSF material used is actually surprisingly tough but this is 3D printing so if you need to shave a bit off you just print one with a bit less. It's pretty small anyway - the entire unit is about the same size as a Farish bogie tower

Alan
"Knowledge has no value or use for the solitary owner: to be enjoyed it must be communicated" -- Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden

Offline kirky

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Re: 3D printed chassis experiment
« Reply #17 on: February 16, 2012, 05:13:15 PM »
The WSF material used is actually surprisingly tough but this is 3D printing so if you need to shave a bit off you just print one with a bit less. It's pretty small anyway - the entire unit is about the same size as a Farish bogie tower

Alan


Yes, thanks for that Alan. What I was kind of thinking was that if you need to get thinner than the minimum wall thickness you could potentially shave a bit off.
Presumably you've run the motor in the model? Does the heat generated affect the material at all?

Cheers
Kirky
Northallerton will make its next public appearance at the LINCOLN MODEL RAILWAY CLUB ANNUAL EXHIBITION Feb 29th -1st Mar 2020



Layout: Northallerton: http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=1671.msg16930#msg16930

www.northallertonngauge.co.uk

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Offline EtchedPixels

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Re: 3D printed chassis experiment
« Reply #18 on: February 16, 2012, 07:19:47 PM »
The WSF material used is actually surprisingly tough but this is 3D printing so if you need to shave a bit off you just print one with a bit less. It's pretty small anyway - the entire unit is about the same size as a Farish bogie tower

Alan


Yes, thanks for that Alan. What I was kind of thinking was that if you need to get thinner than the minimum wall thickness you could potentially shave a bit off.
Presumably you've run the motor in the model? Does the heat generated affect the material at all?

Cheers
Kirky

I've run it a little bit - its too stiff for me to want to seriously run it with that little motor. Heat doesn't seem to be a problem so far but it's a bit early to be entirely sure. Easy enough to have a hole in the top of the mount if its a problem, and stick a bit of metal there.


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Offline Stevie DC

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Re: 3D printed chassis experiment
« Reply #19 on: February 23, 2012, 02:54:25 PM »
Hi Alan,

Having you done anything more with this project?

Offline EtchedPixels

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Re: 3D printed chassis experiment
« Reply #20 on: February 23, 2012, 03:02:49 PM »
Next version is in the Shapeways queue
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Offline Zaonite

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Re: 3D printed chassis experiment
« Reply #21 on: February 23, 2012, 03:50:42 PM »
This is some revolutionary stuff!

Imagine all those kits that require the purchase of a roof, or the butchering of an old coach? Or how about that loco kit that needs X chassis to complete? Just print one!

I'm very interested as to what this method of manufacturing will be capable of in the future. I will be watching this thread with much enthusiasm!

Keep up the good work  :thumbsup:
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Offline EtchedPixels

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Re: 3D printed chassis experiment
« Reply #22 on: March 01, 2012, 11:39:32 PM »
Version 3 arrived today. It's almost the same as version 2 but with the everything given a bit more play, an end stop to deal with the thrust from the worms and the axle holes (over) corrected. This one runs quite nicely on a test rig. Once the next etches appear they have the test pickups on it and it can get a real test.

It's not quite as free running as one with brass bearings would be but it seems good enough and it's not yet been oiled to see if that helps (I suspect not a lot).

Also one of these from Paul Burkitt-Gray, which is almost as tasty as the CAD image looks.  Even the wing mirrors come out nicely in N in FUD.

http://www.shapeways.com/model/378270/

certainly proves you can do N scale cars that way.


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Offline MikeDunn

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Re: 3D printed chassis experiment
« Reply #23 on: March 02, 2012, 08:51:01 AM »
Hi EP,

I'm thinking of doing something like this but have a few queries I hop you may be able to help with ?

*  How easy is the app for creation to learn ?
*  Are there any walk-throughs for it, or good manuals ?
*  On the production front, what's the minimum thickness you can do ?
*  How good to fine details come out ?

Mike

Offline Stew2000

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Re: 3D printed chassis experiment
« Reply #24 on: March 02, 2012, 09:07:56 AM »
Hi EP,

I'm thinking of doing something like this but have a few queries I hop you may be able to help with ?


*  On the production front, what's the minimum thickness you can do ?
*  How good to fine details come out ?

Mike


http://www.shapeways.com/design-rules/frosted-detail

Offline EtchedPixels

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Re: 3D printed chassis experiment
« Reply #25 on: March 02, 2012, 12:13:19 PM »
Hi EP,

I'm thinking of doing something like this but have a few queries I hop you may be able to help with ?

*  How easy is the app for creation to learn ?
*  Are there any walk-throughs for it, or good manuals ?
*  On the production front, what's the minimum thickness you can do ?
*  How good to fine details come out ?

Mike

Depends what app you use. The Shapeways service takes files in standard formats (STL being the common one) which are produced by all sorts of the 3D design apps. I can't really help that much on the apps side as coming from the programming end I've been using a mix of OpenSCAD and tools to program my 3D objects rather than draw them.

Shapeways do have some good tutorials

Details/fineness depend on the material. A general rule is that as the detail level and wall thickness drops the price rises rapidly. FUD (frosted ultra detail) goes down to 0.3mm walls and about 0.1mm detail but is pricy. The chassis is made from the cheap plastic stuff so its got a rough grainy surface and a 0.7mm minimum wall thickness.

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Offline MikeDunn

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Re: 3D printed chassis experiment
« Reply #26 on: March 02, 2012, 12:38:51 PM »
Cheers on that ...

I've shown SWMBO some of the imagery of the 3D models & she's said "I used to draw those on paper" - so I've now put Google SketchUp on her PC & told her to start learning  :smiley-laughing:

She's wanting some bits'n'pieces that seem to be either expensive or just not available - I think she's going to try & make some  :thumbsup:

Mike

Offline doncarlos

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Re: 3D printed chassis experiment
« Reply #27 on: March 29, 2012, 10:45:52 PM »
Hmmm i need a 3D printer!

Offline Ben A

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Re: 3D printed chassis experiment
« Reply #28 on: March 30, 2012, 01:20:50 AM »

Hi Alan

I've only just become aware of this thread - glad I did though, fascinating stuff.

On your most recent chassis, is that a printed NEM socket at the far end?  If so, is it "right" in terms of coupler fit/play/snugness?

The reason I ask is that while I have yet to master 3D design drawing myself (I am still struggling with etch and decal artwork!!) it did occur to me that 3D printing might be the way to go to produce a range of simple alternative NEM coupler systems...

cheers

Ben A.



Offline EtchedPixels

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Re: 3D printed chassis experiment
« Reply #29 on: March 30, 2012, 11:47:53 AM »
It is a NEM socket, although it's not got the fancy springiness a proper "to spec" one should have. So it seems to be fine for fixed rakes but not autocoupling with rapido. Not tried it with the new Dapol ones, I'm waiting for them to fix the spring problem before I consider dabbling.

Couplers themselves are a bit trickier. I've got artwork for a rapido but a couple of bits of it are too thin for the plastics and I fear would be too brittle in the frosted detail material. I shall play with them a bit more, and at some point I may also try printing a OO scale rapido or two, as I can think of some amusing photographic uses for those ;)

If you wanted to print buckeyes I suspect you'd have the same problem.

The next rapido experiment is according to the tracking data in a UPS van driving around Swansea so watch this space...

Alan
"Knowledge has no value or use for the solitary owner: to be enjoyed it must be communicated" -- Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden

 

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