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Author Topic: Upwell Wharf  (Read 4690 times)

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Offline wookie

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Re: Upwell Wharf
« Reply #15 on: February 19, 2016, 12:38:20 PM »
I didn't have a clue when I started, never done anything like it before.
I had to learn everything from scratch, and I'm an old git to learn new tricks, but I got there, so you can too!

Online Papyrus

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Re: Upwell Wharf
« Reply #16 on: February 20, 2016, 11:46:34 AM »
Thanks for all the encouraging replies! I think I might reduce the double track 'main' line to single, but retain the passing loop through the station. That will reduce the number of sections quite considerably, and bring the number of points down by about 4. It will also increase the available space for scenery.

A few holes drilled through the framework will allow the wiring to pass through.

Each bearer does have a hole through it, although they are not very visible on the photo. That's one thing that was thought through!

Looking forward to seeing this layout develop. I have a friend who lives in Upwell and am fascinated by the tramway. Good luck with the layout!

Have you found 'Branch Line to Upwell' by Mitchell, Smith and Ingram (Middleton Press)? Very informative read.

Also a couple of videos you might find interesting:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0Z938wfFgY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SEz9xE_4mNg

Cheers,

Chris
"Outside of a dog, a book is probably man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read."  Groucho Marx

Online Papyrus

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Re: Upwell Wharf
« Reply #17 on: March 27, 2017, 03:54:55 PM »
High time for a (non-)progress report, I think.

I must confess that I haven’t so much as touched Upwell Wharf since August, largely due to external circumstances. We have had a lot of building work done, and a series of visitors, and the ‘railway room’ has been used as a dumping ground. In fact I still can’t actually get to the layout, but that should change over the next few weeks. In the meantime, however, I have become more and more disheartened – so much so that I was on the point of giving up the whole idea and selling all my railway stuff.

I normally sleep very well, but during an unusually sleepless night recently I lay awake working out why I was feeling so despondent. I realised a year ago that the layout I was building was rather complicated and I was daunted by the amount of work involved, especially the wiring – the bit I lack the confidence for. How to get through the block? Was this the layout I really wanted?

I decided to analyse which aspects of the hobby I enjoyed and which I was less keen on – an exercise that perhaps we should all go through even before we start to plan a layout. My summary came out as follows:

Like:
1.   Watching trains moving through the landscape.
2.   Building or kit-bashing stuff – locos, stock, buildings, anything.
3.   Creating a landscape.

Dislike:
1.   Fiddle yards.
2.   Anything electronic more complicated than plugging things in and very simple soldering.
3.   Too much shunting.

On this basis, Upwell Wharf is not the layout I want. I still think the idea is a good one, and I’m sure somebody could build it, make it work and enjoy it, but that person isn’t me. So I am going back to the drawing board. The tramway section will go, but I won’t dispose of the stock I have accumulated. It may very well find its way on to a small shelf layout at some date in the future. A large part of the rest of the layout will be ripped up too and converted into (I hope) a long continuous run with only a few sidings and minimal wiring.

I shall cobble something together on SCARM and put it to the committee in due course.

Cheers,

Chris
"Outside of a dog, a book is probably man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read."  Groucho Marx

Online Newportnobby

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Re: Upwell Wharf
« Reply #18 on: March 27, 2017, 04:17:29 PM »
I wonder how many of us are guilty of letting the heart overrule the brain :hmmm: :-[
Brain says "I'm hopeless at soldering so keep the wiring simple"
Heart says " Look at all that space! Let's fill it with track with lots of points everywhere I can motorise and to hell with what the brain says"

Maybe if you were to build the layout in small linkable modules you would at least feel you have accomplished something if you make sure you finish one before moving onto the next.

Online port perran

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Re: Upwell Wharf
« Reply #19 on: March 27, 2017, 05:26:16 PM »
Go for simplicity I say.
I too hate electronics, wiring and soldering and even more so, have absolutely no interest in it. Although I appreciate that some find it really interesting.
About 4 years ago , on my original layout, I motorised all the points which were worked by a control board.  Took me ages to complete the wiring then after about two weeks I got fed up of changing the points electronically ( it was a a novelty at first) I reverted to changing them by hand. Hence, my latest 2 layouts all have very simple (hand of god) point operation. Plus I'm DC and most people who see my layouts  are staggered at how simple my wiring is (or almost complete lack of wiring in fact).   I use the Peco rail joiners with wires already attached for track feed for ease.
It can be done very, very simply if that's what you want.
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline Innovationgame

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Re: Upwell Wharf
« Reply #20 on: March 27, 2017, 07:46:19 PM »
I use the Peco rail joiners with wires already attached for track feed for ease.
It can be done very, very simply if that's what you want.
I use them too and use chocolate block barrier strip to connect them in, which only requires a small screwdriver.
With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
Coventry Corporation Transport Society: www.cct-society.org.uk
Hessle: www.hessle.org.uk

Online Papyrus

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Re: Upwell Wharf
« Reply #21 on: March 27, 2017, 08:58:45 PM »
Soldering feeds to the rails doesn't worry me. It's the prospect of having to build a control panel with dozens of switches and all the spaghetti behind that defeats me! And the tangle of wires under the baseboard.  :worried:

Thanks for the replies and the encouragement, chaps.

Cheers,

Chris
"Outside of a dog, a book is probably man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read."  Groucho Marx

Offline Webbo

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Re: Upwell Wharf
« Reply #22 on: March 28, 2017, 12:29:34 AM »
Chris

You and I are pretty much on the same page with regards to what we want out of our layouts. I have a largish fiddle yard but that is used for storing trains and not for operations so no electric point control there. Otherwise, my layout is a single mainline with two passing loops that are controlled by electrically switched points (total of 5) as well as a siding running into a grain elevator and a freight depot mainly there for scenic purposes. As with you, I like running trains through scenery and that is where my focus is. For me, there is no need for multiple loco control and there will be no shunting. My layout is DC, though I can switch it to DCC operation when I want to run my few locos that are fitted with sound. Like you, I take pleasure in making things, but not much scratch building has happened so far.

This layout works for me. Others have different views on what their layouts are all about and I think that is great. Our hobby is about diversity.

Webbo 

 

Online Papyrus

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Re: Upwell Wharf
« Reply #23 on: March 28, 2017, 11:20:01 AM »
As with you, I like running trains through scenery and that is where my focus is. For me, there is no need for multiple loco control and there will be no shunting.

I'm glad it's not just me! When I go to exhibitions and I see trains being shunted very, very ser-lower-ly I lose the will to live. I feel I must be missing something...

We could start a pressure group! Call ourselves Total Railway Activity Involving No Shunting! I'm sure we could make an appropriate acronym out of that...  :D

Damn. I've just gone  :offtopicsign: on my own thread...  :doh:

Cheers,

Chris
"Outside of a dog, a book is probably man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read."  Groucho Marx

Offline keithbythe sea

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Re: Upwell Wharf
« Reply #24 on: March 28, 2017, 04:19:38 PM »
Keep persevering Chris, the only way to eat the elephant is in bite sized chunks.

Like many others it's the scenery and running trains that interest me. All of my points are "Maradonna" and I too use the peco pre-wired track feed. Whilst my layout is not large I have concentrated on one scenic area to start with so that I can feel that progress is being made (however glacial that may be). Also it's not work, progress is at your pace and on your terms!!

Online port perran

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Re: Upwell Wharf
« Reply #25 on: March 28, 2017, 07:57:08 PM »
Some interesting points (no pun intended) being made here.
I too like the scenic side of things. I'm quite happy at exhibitions if the scenery is brilliant but no trains are running (there's still plenty to look at).
And as for slow shunting layouts....forget them as far as I'm concerned.   I'd much rather watch a train traversing a layout at a reasonably correct scale speed even if it just goes round and round.
But then.......we are all different.
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline Mito

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Re: Upwell Wharf
« Reply #26 on: March 28, 2017, 10:04:15 PM »
I too like watching trains go by. I try though to broaden my horizons by trying different things. I have just finished a control panel and got the wiring looking quite neat and tidy. Points are digitally operated, usually with the right hand index finger but am thinking of using servos. That will be a new adventure into electronics. The diversity in railway modeling is incredible so do your own thing to your own standards and ideas in your own time, and enjoy it.
You know you're getting older when your mind makes commitments your body can't meet.
https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=24101.0 Off on a journey

Online Chris in Prague

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Re: Upwell Wharf
« Reply #27 on: April 09, 2017, 10:52:24 AM »
A very interesting conversation. Apart from enjoying shunting, my views are very similar to Martin's. However, of necessity, Cant Cove is a layout for shunting, photographing, and staging stories with trains and 'Little People'. Fortunately, I have a friend who does all the wiring (For DCC power and lighting) and soldering and all points are hand-operated because I see no advantage in a more complicated solution except, perhaps in the small rear fiddle yard. I'd like to have working signals, though, but not interlocked with points. I enjoy the scenic work most and operating trains according to a realistic WTT.

 

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