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Author Topic: Newbie track planning advice  (Read 2879 times)

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Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Newbie track planning advice
« Reply #30 on: February 16, 2017, 09:53:35 AM »

Proves to me that Scarm is crap.

Bit harsh, George. I have the same opinion of Anyrail and like SCARM :P

Offline PostModN66

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Re: Newbie track planning advice
« Reply #31 on: February 16, 2017, 10:05:56 AM »
Hi funkyorange,

I like this idea; it seems a really good way of using the track that came with your set, and practicing on a modest layout.

My advice for what it's worth is:

Keep the track plan really simple.  The layout will be just for watching trains, as the glass top will make it very frustrating when you get a derailment, so use no points to minimise the chances of this happening (or maybe have one just for the practice of wiring up and ballasting a point).

If I were doing it I would just use a single circuit and go to town on the scenery.   This also avoids the complication or expense of controlling the second train.

If you really get the N gauge bug your next layout won't be a coffee table layout, so I would just make this layout as good as it can be without thoughts of reusing anything after.

Here is what I regard as the epitome of small roundy layouts, by Jason Pierce (Silverfox).   This might be the "feel" you are looking for, but this is fitted in a boxfile so you will have much more space.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3pQeqIvIBb0&feature=youtu.be

Good luck with it!

Cheers Jon  :)
“We must conduct research and then accept the results. If they don't stand up to experimentation, Buddha's own words must be rejected.” ― Dalai Lama XIV

My Postmodern Image Layouts

Lofthole http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=14792.msg147178#msg147178

Deansmoor http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=14741.msg146381#msg146381

Offline themadhippy

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Re: Newbie track planning advice
« Reply #32 on: February 16, 2017, 11:07:25 AM »
Quote
far better product, simple to use and it works
In your opinion.My opinion apart from those 2 bugs is it beats anyrail hands down on usability,plays nicely with linux and is many times cheaper if you want to use more than 50 track pieces

Offline funkyorange

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Re: Newbie track planning advice
« Reply #33 on: February 18, 2017, 02:16:34 PM »
Thanks all.

I have had a think and I think I am going to go with one loop for now and actually finish this project! As mentioned I can always upgrade in the future if I love it and it leaves me the room to make mistakes.

Two loops its a bit of a skills set up from where I am and I'd rather nail a easy design than fail on a more advanced one!

Thanks all, I hope to post some images when its been built :)


Offline njee20

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Re: Newbie track planning advice
« Reply #34 on: February 18, 2017, 08:10:39 PM »
You'll never finish, even something modest, that's the fun ;)

And AnyRail over Scarm all day long. I found the latter utterly horrendous to use! 50 pieces was enough to plan my 13x3ft 4-track layout, it's not much of a limit! YMMV.

Offline PeteW

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Re: Newbie track planning advice
« Reply #35 on: February 19, 2017, 01:30:11 AM »
YMMV.
Sorry, I'm new, but I sense there may be a need for balance here. I'd never used any track planning software until a couple of weeks ago, but I downloaded SCARM and found it fine. It took a few sessions to get the hang of it, but that's true for every piece of software I've used in the last 30 years. Somewhere out there, there's software that will make sense for you; go find it. Do not take anyone else's word for it - you have to find it yourself.

Also note (and this is true for every kind of software): for every minute you spend in one application, it will take you at least two minutes to get to grips with an alternative.

Offline njee20

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Re: Newbie track planning advice
« Reply #36 on: February 19, 2017, 01:43:34 AM »
I think the thread is showing balance to be fair, we've got people in both camps. At least no one's recommending WinRail!

Offline dannyboy

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Re: Newbie track planning advice
« Reply #37 on: February 19, 2017, 02:01:16 AM »
At least no one's recommending WinRail!

Aw come on, there must be someone using WinRail..........................surely...............somewhere.............anybody?  ;)
David.
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If a friend seems distant, catch up with him.

Offline funkyorange

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Re: Newbie track planning advice
« Reply #38 on: April 13, 2017, 12:37:16 AM »
Ok sorry to disturb other software users but I have used AnyRail!

It has taken me some time to get round to this. I have decided to use Kato track and a double loop design.

I have no experience so be gentle! Here are my two designs...

Think i'm more inclined to go with Design 2 but please I'd be happy to take advice from anyone?! The second design the straight on the top right does not completely join - hopefully I can sort this out.

http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/50/5942-130417003443.jpeg
http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/50/5942-130417003633.jpeg



Offline dannyboy

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Re: Newbie track planning advice
« Reply #39 on: April 13, 2017, 12:58:39 AM »
The second design the straight on the top right does not completely join - hopefully I can sort this out.


@funkyorange
Kato Unitrack does not have flexible pieces. However, by very gently cutting the plastic base at right angles to the track, from underneath to very near the rails, it can be made slightly flexible. I have done this with a few pieces to help align track that does not quite meet. (That tends to happen when you do not follow a set plan!). The website www.fiferhobby.com has lots of useful info and does have a video showing how to make the track 'flexi'. I know Unitrack has its detractors, but it also has lots of afficianados - me included.  :beers:
Incidentally, is the opposite of detractors, protractors  :) :doh:.
David.
I used to be indecisive - now I'm not - I don't think.
If a friend seems distant, catch up with him.

 

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