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Author Topic: Electric decouplers  (Read 1084 times)

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Offline lendix

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Electric decouplers
« on: September 26, 2016, 10:04:26 AM »
Has anyone had experience with Peco electric remote decouplers? Do they work, etc.? I have a terminus where locos can be reversed out by a third line to be turned round at a turntable, but manual decoupling is a fiddly business. And I also would like to build a canopy over the platforms. Comments welcome.

Offline Only Me

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Re: Electric decouplers
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2016, 10:59:35 AM »
I use dapol easy shunts... Google Croix auto coupler ;)



Offline elmo

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Re: Electric decouplers
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2016, 12:21:52 PM »
The peco uncoupler is an electromagnet that requires the use of their steel arms that are fitted to the coupling. When the magnet is energised the lift arm is pulled towards the magnet which in turn raises the coupling.

I use the peco system on a shunting layout and it works very well. HOWEVER - it is designed to work with the non-sprung peco coupling.

It will uncouple a peco coupling from both rigid nem couplings as well as sprung couplings. This system will NOT work if the coupling being lifted is a sprung coupling. It will work on a nem coupling if the fitting is loose but but they can be awkward to set up.

Elmo

Offline edwin_m

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Re: Electric decouplers
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2016, 12:42:34 PM »
I use dapol easy shunts... Google Croix auto coupler ;)

Are you referring to Krois?  I've seen reference to this and it looks interesting for splitting/joining multiple units but never found anyone who uses it or any comments about how easy it is to fit and use. 

Offline Only Me

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Re: Electric decouplers
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2016, 03:38:27 PM »
Yes Krois, i had one on each end of a class 08, worked very well, then sold the 08



Offline Chris Morris

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Re: Electric decouplers
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2016, 03:44:49 PM »
I use the Peco system with reasonable success although I use the Gaugemaster electro magnets. I have removed the spring from the end coupling on the coaches and wagons I wish to uncouple. The coupling droops a bit but generally stays coupled while ambling along my branch line.
They guy who invented this idea uses staples bent to shape rather than the little steel strips . I tried this but struggled to drill a hole in the narrow coupling shank so I used the Peco metal strips. I file parts of the strip down around the coupler end so there is absolutely nothing to catch on the loco coupling. There is not sufficient space on all vehicles for the coupler to rise as much as it needs to to uncouple.

Offline elmo

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Re: Electric decouplers
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2016, 04:31:22 PM »
And I forgot to mention - on couplings where I remove the spring I bend the metal drop arm against the coupling housing so that it holds the coupling level before bending the end down so as to catch the magnetic force.

Elmo

Offline Chris Morris

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Re: Electric decouplers
« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2016, 05:10:53 PM »
You can see how effective the Peco system can be on the video at  54 seconds and 4 min 22 seconds. I was filming, driving and operating the uncoupler myself.


Offline Caz

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Re: Electric decouplers
« Reply #8 on: September 28, 2016, 11:10:51 AM »
I think I have tried almost every coupler available to enable automation on Claywell including the Crois coupler, good but gets expensive as you need a lot of them.  Tried Peco (as said only works on Peco couplers), MBM, B&B and various other versions of their them but finally settled on the Dapol EasiShunts especially as a lot of stock now comes fitted with them NEM pockets and it is fairly easy to convert almost anything else using the Dapol fittling kit.

Ok, I agree the Dapol is not perfect as the delayed uncoupling is a little flakey but with careful sighting of the uncoupler magnets it is not a problem and I find it is easy to use with my computer controlled layout allowing me to automatically do run around manoeuvres and switch stock around etc.

Offline lendix

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Re: Electric decouplers
« Reply #9 on: September 28, 2016, 05:43:41 PM »
Thanks, Caz, but could you be a little kinder to an ignoramous like me, and explain the different types of couplers, and which they are. I've undoubtedly got a mixture already, with Bachman, Dapol, Minitrix and Grafar, plus a number of probably Lima coaches as well as others et al.
Can any be converted to Dapol whenever you said?
Thanks.

Offline keithfre

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Re: Electric decouplers
« Reply #10 on: September 28, 2016, 06:46:05 PM »
This system will NOT work if the coupling being lifted is a sprung coupling.
Is that true of the Seep electromagnets too, Elmo, or are they more powerful and therefore able to uncouple sprung couplings?

Offline elmo

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Re: Electric decouplers
« Reply #11 on: September 28, 2016, 08:29:00 PM »
This system will NOT work if the coupling being lifted is a sprung coupling.
Is that true of the Seep electromagnets too, Elmo, or are they more powerful and therefore able to uncouple sprung couplings?

The magnetic system needs the couplings to be loose so they can lift. The spring pushes both couplings together thus they will stick and either not lift or lift both couplings thus not uncouple.

Regarding the seep magnets, I have not used them but have seen various quotes about the peco magnet not being strong enough. I have used the peco magnets for both the peco coupling and DG and not had a problem with them not being strong enough. I do though set the top of the steel bar at the same height as the top of the sleeper and use a dedicated 16v ac supply to feed nothing but the electro magnets.

Elmo

 

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