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Author Topic: Marton Hinmarche  (Read 289209 times)

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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #3930 on: February 12, 2020, 06:33:18 PM »
I had a lot of U3A work to do this morning but, because we leave later on a Wednesday, I did have time for an operating session in the Train Shed before we left.  This time I ran the final session of the day (In Marton Hinmarche time).  I am currently running a Monday to Saturday timetable, but it would be good at some stage to introduce a Sunday timetable.  It will be tricky, because everything needs to finish up in the same place as it started.  However, I think itís worth a try.

Two of the last trains of the day to pass through Marton Hinmarche are G2, 49368, with a train of empties, on its way back to Coventry Colliery to pick up another load of coal and 9F, 92006, on its way back to Grimsby for a fresh consignment of fish for Bristol.  Here they are passing through the station at about ten past nine in the evening.



The only other trains to run on the main line after this are the return pickup goods and the return milk train.

We had the U3A table tennis group in the afternoon, so I didnít get to visit the Train Shed again.  However, my main focus now is completing the design of the Creamery House, so that I can get on with building it once itís cut out.

With kind regards
Laurence
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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #3931 on: February 13, 2020, 08:00:34 PM »
I didnít manage to visit the Train Shed at all today.  However, I have made considerable progress with the Creamery House.  First thing, I walked into Hessle to the hairdressers.  When I returned, we had coffee and then I loaded a suitcase full of interview clothes into the boot of the car.  I dropped Celia off in Hessle for her hair appointment and then took the suitcase into Hull to CatZero.  They give training and character building to underprivileged people of all ages.  The one thing most of their clients do not posses is interview clothes.  So, we at Hessle U3A, donate suitable clothes that are no longer required and which, often, have been hanging (literally around in wardrobes for years.

At dinnertime, we went out for lunch and then, in the afternoon, I cleaned out the pond, removing what must have been about 100kg of weed and matted roots.  But, throughout the day, I have been working on the Creamery House.  I have finished the design of all the window walls, which you can see here.



The other day, I found a supplier of 10 thou (0.25mm) Plasticard and it arrived today.  I tried a test cut and the Silhouette Portrait cuts right through it, so we are really in business.  Now 0.25mm is not sufficiently rigid for the model, even though I will be using four layers for each of the window walls.  But my plan is to make two examples of each panel and then stick them together to make a laminated panel.  I recently bought a spare blade for the Silhouette and I had to use it yesterday because I cut out some butterflies for Celia and my first attempt, with the original blade, resulted in some rips in the paper.  So I put in the new blade and that did the trick.  I tried todayís test cut with the new blade and then put in the original one, thinking that it would be alright for Plasticard.  The cutting process takes quite a long time, so I had to wait until the Silhouette had finished before I could inspect the Plasticard sheet. 
Unfortunately, although it cut almost through so that I could, with difficulty, push out some of the doors and windows, it wasnít very satisfactory, so I replace the blade and tried again.  This time, when I pealed off the Plasticard, it came away in sections and left a lot of the window cut-outs stuck to the cutting mat.



The rest were quite easy to remove.  However, I found that I had made a mistake with one of the repeats, so the windows didnít quite line up.



I also found that, on one of the front wall panels, one of the windows was not cut properly and could not be removed without great difficulty.  However, I may be able to salvage a couple of wall panels from the first cut, so all is not lost (not yet anyway).

Tomorrow, I will try to make progress with the cut-outs and the salvage operation from the original cut.  However, one lesson is clear: the blade points are easily blunted by Plasticard and so it may be prudent to keep a couple of spares in case of problems in future.  They are not cheap, but indipensible.
With kind regards
Laurence
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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #3932 on: February 14, 2020, 07:00:01 PM »
Because we had to visit the hairdresserís yesterday, we decided to have our day out today.  We elected to go to Hodsock Priory to see the snowdrops.  I spent most of the time before we went removing all the bits stuck to the cutting mat and, after that, all the window parts from the Plasticard that hadnít come away when I cut the sheet.  I didnít finish the job, but I took all the wall sections down to the Train Shed and cut out a few more windows.  After we returned from Hodsock, I remembered that it was Fridayís chores day and so that kept me busy for quite a while. 

Eventually, I managed a short stint in the Train Shed and completed the cutting out of windows, plus I cut out all windows from the salvaged sections that I had originally cut with the old blade.  I paired everything up ready for sticking the pairs together to make a single 20 thou sheet from two 10 thou sheets.  Here are the sheets for the front wall.



After that, I stuck the front wall pairs together and they seem to have lined up very nicely.  The next job will be to stick the rear wall sections together and then the side wall sections of the rear two-story extension.  Meanwhile, back at the ranch, I need to create a sheet for all the non-window sections, which I will cut from 20 thou Plasticard, because I donít need to cut right through to snap off the individual sections.  I ordered some more autoblades for the Silhouette last night.
With kind regards
Laurence
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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #3933 on: February 15, 2020, 07:45:58 PM »
Today, we walked into Hessle fairly early to beat the storm, but once again, so far, it has turned out to be a storm in a teacup.  The winds have increased throughout the day, but no gusts have reached 40mph and thereís been virtually no rain.  Perhaps it will come in the night.  We returned for coffee and then I harvested some carrots for tomorrow (in case the weather is too bad in the morning) before finishing off all my weekly jobs.  I did manage to get on with the Creamery House.  In the afternoon, I went to the Train Shed and fixed all the 10 thou sheet pairs together, so now everything is in 20 thou thicknesses ready for assembly.

While I was in the Train Shed, I ran the next timetable cycle, the first of the day in Marton Hinmarche time.  I donít have any pictures of todayís work, but here is an old video of what you would have seen, had you been in the Train Shed this afternoon.



Later, I managed to finish all the work on the non-windows sheet and, eventually, I cut the parts out from a 20 thou sheet of Plasticard.  So they are all ready for assembly tomorrow.  Finally, I cut out the glazing panels from transparent film and everything is now ready to go.

Hopefully, tomorrow, I will be able to post some more pictures.  I have just realised that I havenít fitted any gutters or downpipes to the farmhouse, so I need to think how I am going to achieve that.
With kind regards
Laurence
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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #3934 on: February 15, 2020, 08:34:40 PM »
I have just realised that I havenít fitted any gutters or downpipes to the farmhouse, so I need to think how I am going to achieve that.

I think these can be left off.  Look at your very nice Metcalfe card buildings - how many of these have gutters or downpipes?

Or, perhaps, include the downpipes and represent the gutters with a line of paint.  Probably details like these are best left off than included overscale.  The eye sort of fills in missing details.

Best wishes.

John
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The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1930s to the 1950s.

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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #3935 on: February 15, 2020, 09:53:41 PM »
Gutters and downpipes:
If a thing is worth doing then the little touches help it look so much better.

Here's a model of a small house in my village that I made in the pre-silhouette days. The gutters are Evergreen half round strip and the downpipes are 1mm plastic rod held in place by twisted wire brackets.


I know 1mm is slightly overscale but any smaller was too fragile.
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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #3936 on: February 16, 2020, 06:43:26 AM »
I have just realised that I havenít fitted any gutters or downpipes to the farmhouse, so I need to think how I am going to achieve that.

I think these can be left off.  Look at your very nice Metcalfe card buildings - how many of these have gutters or downpipes?

Or, perhaps, include the downpipes and represent the gutters with a line of paint.  Probably details like these are best left off than included overscale.  The eye sort of fills in missing details.

Best wishes.

John
Thanks John.  The Scalescenes houses have folded paper gutters and downpipes, which are difficult to get right, but when they are, they look reasonably good.

Gutters and downpipes:
If a thing is worth doing then the little touches help it look so much better.

Here's a model of a small house in my village that I made in the pre-silhouette days. The gutters are Evergreen half round strip and the downpipes are 1mm plastic rod held in place by twisted wire brackets.
I know 1mm is slightly overscale but any smaller was too fragile.
I've ordered some styrene from Fred Aldous for the gutters and downpipes and I'll try them out to see if they work on my models.  Thanks for the info.
With kind regards
Laurence
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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #3937 on: February 16, 2020, 05:50:31 PM »
Well, if Storm Ciara was a storm in a teacup in this part of the world, Storm Dennis turned out to be a damp squib.  To misquote T S Elliot, ďThis is the way the storm ends - Not with a bang but a whimperĒ. Yes, itís been windy, although breezy would be more accurate most of the time.  We did have a gust of over 40mph over night and one or two gusts of about the same speed mid-morning today, when a heavy shower arrived.  But we only had 1mm of rain during the day yesterday, although we did have just over 15mm of rain overnight.  But, to me at least, this just seems like normal Winter weather.  Now other parts of the UK, we hear, have fared far worse, so we must just be in a sheltered part of the country.  Even the bridge didnít roar very much during the night.

But back to railway modelling.  This morning, I printed off an A4 label with Scalescenes dressed stone.  I didnít think it looked right on the farmhouse, but the Creamery House is a bit more special and, I think, dressed stone will look right for it.  We went out to our favourite garden centre for coffee this morning but, before we went, I visited the Train Shed and made a start on the Creamery House in earnest.  I cut out all the non-windows sections and then set about adding the stone facing to the front of the building.



As you can see, I have started to cut out the windows and doors.  I always begin by covering the whole of the outer face of the wall with a cover layer, which I cut out and peel from the label sheet.  Then I trim the edges and cut crosses in all the openings from the rear.  The surplus edges are then folded over through the opening and stuck onto the back of the sheet.



This has been cribbed from Rogerís excellent description of his method with the odd variations to suit my ability and inclination.

I spent part of the day printing and cutting some butterfly designs for Celia.  Now that I have the Silhouette machine, I might as well utilise some of its features that will help Celia, although I am still learning how to do some of the things, such as printing and cutting.  Later, I paid another visit to the Train Shed and continued where I had left off in the morning.  I finished all the openings on the front wall, added the window frames and glazing panel and then cut out and hung all the curtains for that wall.  Hereís the final result with curtains all in place.



After that, I had time to make a start on the back wall.  I cut out all the openings and fixed the window frames to the inside.



They donít quite line up as I would like them, but I think they will be acceptable for a first attempt.  I am still developing my skills and technique, both at designing the panels so that everything lines up and actually cutting out and fixing things.  Tomorrow, I hope to be able to make more progress with the model.
With kind regards
Laurence
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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #3938 on: February 16, 2020, 06:24:38 PM »
I printed off an A4 label with Scalescenes dressed stone.

Printed A4 self-adhesive labels are one of my favourite things for scratch building.

I always begin by covering the whole of the outer face of the wall with a cover layer, which I cut out and peel from the label sheet.  Then I trim the edges and cut crosses in all the openings from the rear.  The surplus edges are then folded over through the opening and stuck onto the back of the sheet.


Exactly how I do it Laurence, or, to quote that old hand puppet, "That's the way to do it". I use my cutting mat markings to ensure that the label is stuck down accurately.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2020, 10:43:18 PM by dannyboy, Reason: added a bit »
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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #3939 on: February 16, 2020, 10:39:31 PM »
It might seem that I'm banging on about this but with a bit of practice you can achieve so much with these cutters.

For instance, you can vary the depth of cut, as you know, but if you do a run at one depth then re-run a separate set of cuts (different colour on your drawing) at another depth without taking the styrene sheet out of the cutter you can make your own features such as dressed stone, roofing slates, etc. that will line up perfectly with your first cuts.

Example:

Main cuts done at blade depth 10 (pressure 33), minor feature cuts at depth 5 (pressure 20). 20 thou styrene. (Balustrades by Caldercraft - 8p each.... bloody expensive :o)


Incidentally, these were made entirely on the silhouette too.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2020, 10:43:56 PM by Vigo »
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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #3940 on: February 17, 2020, 06:30:48 AM »
Incidentally, these were made entirely on the silhouette too.
Wow!
With kind regards
Laurence
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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #3941 on: February 17, 2020, 05:10:25 PM »
Laurence, Wow! was my response, also!

Leon
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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #3942 on: February 17, 2020, 06:30:31 PM »
Last night, I discovered the error in my Silhouette design that caused the mis-alignment of the upper windows at the back of the house.  So I corrected it and made a new cut of the back of the house.  Today was table tennis day, of course, but I managed a short visit to the Train Shed before we set off.  In this morningís session, I dismantled what I had done with the back wall and tried to use some of the new pieces to make it better, so to speak.  However, in the end, it proved impossible to make-do-and-mend, so I cemented the new thin sections together and started again.  I cut a new cover layer and managed to get the frames back.  However, when I came to refit the glazing sheet, it had completely disappeared.

In the afternoon, I took a spare piece of glazing sheet down to the Train Shed and cut it to size, fitting it to the back of the frames.  Then I spent some time hanging curtains and then fitting the curtains sheet to the glazing sheet.  After that I covered the end walls with dressed stone and, at that point, I found the missing glazing sheet.  Because plastics sheets pick up static electricity, it had stuck itself to the back of the dressed stone paper.  Unfortunately, because I didnít know it was there, I managed to cut it in half when I cut the dressed stone for the end wall.  I was now ready to start assembling the main house.  First, I attached the end well spacer to the base sheet and then fixed the end walls to it.



The really fiddly bit came when I tried to fit the front and back walls, but I got them pretty well right in the end.  Then, another fiddly bit, I fitted the ceiling panel.



So now I am ready to assemble the chimney stacks and fit them to the inside of the side walls, after which I will be able to think about adding the roof.  Once I have completed the main house, I will be able to start on the rear extension.  I can wait until I have finished the main house because the rear extension it is only a two-storey one and so I donít need to think about integrating the roof sections.  When it is finished, I can simply fix it to the blank part of rear wall.

I have decided that my next couple of projects for the Silhouette will be a row of low relief shops for the other side of the High Street and a row of cottages for the station side of the High Street.
With kind regards
Laurence
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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #3943 on: February 18, 2020, 06:58:46 PM »
Today was a slightly unusual day.  It is half term and our granddaughter is a teacher, so Celia thought it would be a good opportunity to take her on a shopping trip to York.  The consequence of that was that, instead of going to the gym, I settled for a trip to J Sainsbury followed by some time in the Train Shed.  I also spent quite a bit of time rejigging the design the row of shops, until I was satisfied that it was OK.  However, before I went off to J Sainsbury, I made a visit to the Train Shed and assembled the first chimneystack.  After I returned from the supermarket, I had coffee and did some more work on the design of the shops.  This involved several brief visits to the Train Shed to check the dimensions of my existing buildings, because I didnít want to deviate too much from the size of properties already installed on the layout.

After dinner, I had a serious session in the Train Shed and began by assembling the second chimneystack.  Here they both are after assembly.



However, when I came to fit them to the Creamery House, it became apparent that I had made them twice as long as they should have been, twenty four feet high instead of twelve.  That left me with a dilemma: should I recut the sheet all over again, or try to cut the existing ones down to size?  I decided that there was nothing to lose by trying to cut them in half and so I tried, first with a razor blade, which wasnít very rewarding, followed by using a razor saw.  The latter worked, after a fashion although, at the death, the chimneystack collapsed.  However, all was not lost.  I realised that I could use the two halves of the doctored chimneystack by trimming up the ends and reassembling them.  Iím pleased to say that it worked and I was able to add the cover layers.



I fixed them to the inside of the gable ends but, because the join was part paper and part Plasticard, I opted to use a little Speedbond on the paper together with Liquid Poly on the Plasticard.  That certainly did the job.  So the next operation was to fix the roof support between the two chimneystacks.  However, somehow, the roof support had disappeared.

Now I keep all the parts for the model in a flat tin, but the roof support wasnít there.  I searched everywhere, but all in vain.  So, in the end, I measured up a piece of unused Plasticard and cut a new one.  Unfortunately, because I cut it 1mm short (56mm instead of 57mm), the gable ends are leaning inwards a little, but when I fit the roof, that should sort it out.  Hereís the main part of the house with the chimneystacks and roof support fitted.



I took the liberty of taking another picture from the back because I donít think I have shown you the back since the curtains were fitted.



The large blank area of wall at the back is where the rear, two-storey extension will fit.  Tomorrow, I hope to be able to add the slates to the roof sections and fit the roof.  It will then begin to look more like the finished article then.
With kind regards
Laurence
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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #3944 on: February 19, 2020, 05:35:16 PM »
Today was a normal gym day and I managed a session in the Train Shed before we set off.  However, before I went to the Train Shed, I did a lot more work on the design of the row of shops.  I kept finding mistakes and had to continually go back and recheck everything.  But I think Iíve got everything in the right place now.  But, before I finished, I realised that I could not get everything onto a single sheet of Plasticard.  I had hoped to be able to continue with using 10 thou Plasticard for the window sections but, with the duplicates to make the sections double thickness, they only filled just over half of a sheet.  If it had been just under half a sheet, that wouldnít have been a problem because I cut have cut two sets.

So, now, I have a choice to make.  I could reduce the row to three shops and use 20 thou Plasticard for the non-windows sections, as I did with the Creamery House, but that would leave me with an end chimney, which I donít really want.  Alternatively, I could cut everything using 20 thou Plasticard, so there would be no need for duplicates, but that would make the windows much more difficult to cut out.  Another option would be to cut the window sections on 10 thou Plasticard and the non-windows sections using 20 thou Plasticard, hoping to use the rest of the sheet for a slightly smaller model.  A fourth possibility might be to slightly reduce the height of the buildings to squeeze two rows of shops into a single card.  The Juryís out.

Things were a lot simpler when I arrived at the Train Shed.  Well, simpler but fraught with more mistakes.  I cut out the roof panels and added the slate cover layers.  However, I made a hash of it twice with the front roof section and again once with the rear roof section.  The problems stemmed from the fact that I am using self-adhesive labels for the cover layers and they grab the Plasticard suddenly and firmly so, if the alignment is out a bit, it is virtually impossible to get them off again without damaging them.  But I persevered and managed to fit both roof sections.



After dinner, it came on to drizzle, so working in the garden was a non-starter.  The postman brought me the Evergreen styrene guttering and drainpipes that were recommended, so I will be in a position to backfit those to the farmhouse, before fitting them to the Creamery House.  I did some more work on the design of the shops and then went to the Train Shed again.  I managed to fit the self-adhesive ridge tiles, after a fashion.



I havenít fitted the chimney capping stones yet because I will leave them until I am in a position to fit the ones to the rear extension as well, which will mean I can drill and paint them all at the same time.  Then I set about assembling the side walls of the rear extension.  I fitted the window frames and glazing panel, and then made and hung the curtains, finally assembling the whole.  However, I now realise that I missed the vital step of adding the covering layer to the outside sections.  So I will have to see if I can dismantle them both again tomorrow without too much damage.  Otherwise, I will have to recut them on the Silhouette and start again (Arghhh!).  Anyway, hereís what I managed to achieve.



If I have to start again with the rear extension, I may cut my losses and add those sections to the sheet with the row of shops.
With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
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