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Author Topic: Marton Hinmarche  (Read 288562 times)

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Online degsy_safc

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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #4215 on: May 22, 2020, 03:31:05 PM »
Thanks Mike

I will continue to think on it.  I can buy everything in ply, precision-cut to the exact sizes to get it all to fit perfectly, which is expensive, or I could buy sheeting and timber.  But I don't have a precision saw system, so that would involve a different type of expense.  I need to be able to cut sheets for the tops and timber for the sides, etc, which might involve two different types of saw.  I have a hand-held circular saw, a panel say anda tennon saw, but I don't think I could get the accuracy with them.
Hi Laurence,

A table saw would be nice, Iíve often thought about buying one. But you need to be fully aware of what you are doing with them, how you plan feeding the timber through them and certainly have an exit table so the timber doesnít drop. Thatís when binding occurs and I can tell you that a bit of timber travelling in a direction you donít want it to at Mach 3 is very scary. I personally would not want to pass an 8íx4í sheet of ply or mdf through a table saw - to be fair a decent table saw is a few hundred pounds, would you not be better biting the bullet and paying to get the timbers cut for you  :hmmm:

If you still want to go down the route of cutting the material yourself, The alternative would be a track saw, very similar to your circular saw but designed to run on an aluminium track (mine is a Makita Track saw, I love it) Position the track precisely on your marked lines and a good quality track saw will make a lovely square cut. You need to make sure the blade is square to the track when fitted, especially straight out of the box on first set up. Set the depth of cut about 1mm deeper than the material (donít forget to add the depth of the alu track) and then away you go. You do need a decent enough working space/bench and some sacrificial material on the underside for the blade to score as it passes over your piece. I use a couple of sheets of kingspan under my sheets, cheap enough and last for ages.

A track saw and a Compound mitre saw are perfect for your sheet materials and timber bracings, you could ditch the mitre saw and cut the bracings manually with a handsaw, but the mitre saw is a really good tool to have.

Anyway good luck with whatever you choose.

Cheers Derek
Cheers Derek

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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #4216 on: May 22, 2020, 07:07:19 PM »
Hi Laurence I would stay with plywood but 9mm is good enough, I think 12mm is overkill and heavy. MDF does not accept screws has good as ply, then there is the dust problem and it distorts if it gets damp. Yes table saws are dangerous things, well all saws can be dangerous, not heard of the track saw, now what excuse can I think of to buy one....lol
Lil Chris
My new layout here, Irwell Valley Railway. https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=47127.0

my old layout was East Lancashire Lines.

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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #4217 on: May 22, 2020, 07:24:59 PM »
Laurence

Just another one to throw in your decision process, have you considered any of the baseboard kits advertised in the model press. I donít know what the prices are but could save you a lot of hassle. Maybe worth a quick look.

Stay safe

Mike H 8)

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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #4218 on: May 22, 2020, 07:33:59 PM »
Hi Laurence I would stay with plywood but 9mm is good enough, I think 12mm is overkill and heavy. MDF does not accept screws has good as ply, then there is the dust problem and it distorts if it gets damp. Yes table saws are dangerous things, well all saws can be dangerous, not heard of the track saw, now what excuse can I think of to buy one....lol
Hi Chris - the track saw is the best saw I own, look them up, youíll defo need one  :smiley-laughing:

Cheers Derek
Cheers Derek

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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #4219 on: May 22, 2020, 07:54:56 PM »
Laurence

Just another one to throw in your decision process, have you considered any of the baseboard kits advertised in the model press. I donít know what the prices are but could save you a lot of hassle. Maybe worth a quick look.

Stay safe

Mike H 8)
My current baseboards are from Model RaIway Solutions and are 9mm throughout.  However, 9mm is too thin for track pins without cutting the ends off the pins.  Also, I thought that 12mm would make the whole thing a little stiffer.  I am current;y investigating buying everything ready cut, although it is somewhat expensive.  However, it may be offset by not having to buy new machinery.
With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
Coventry Corporation Transport Society: www.cct-society.org.uk
Hessle: www.hessle.org.uk

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #4220 on: May 22, 2020, 08:01:06 PM »
Friday is our domestic chores day and it seems to come round more and more often.  Eventually, we went out for our morning walk and posted some cards.  Then we returned for a late coffee.  There were still more chores to do and I also re-edited yesterdayís video.  After dinner, I started on garden jobs, including yet more convolvulus weeding.  Yesterday, I managed to string up all the greenhouse tomatoes.



The postman brought me the AD28 battery for my BR Bardic Lamp.



But I was able to get down to the Train Shed in the end.  I tried the battery in the lamp and it fitted, but the lamp required a repair because one of the wires had been pulled out of the battery plug. 



I was able to solder it back again, but the lamp didnít work.  I checked the output voltage of the battery, but it was only 4V, although it should have still worked.  I suspect it is a very old battery.  I checked the continuity through the lamp, but it registered open circuit.  I couldnít work out how to get the bulb out, so I finished up dismantling the whole thing. 



During the dismantling process, I discovered the on-off mechanism, but that didnít help.  I think I can now reassemble the lamp and fit the new lamp more easily.  Anyway, after that, I turned my attention to 64960 again.  Yesterday, I finished up by giving it a dose of contact cleaner up the driver cavity and left it overnight.  Today, it was still iffy so I disabled the acceleration and set the top speed from 50 to 100.  I left it running for a couple of hours and then gave it some more attention.  Iím pleased to be able to report that it is now much better.  I canít say that the operation of the drivers is absolutely perfect, but here it is in Black Horse Cutting,



Tomorrow, I may turn my attention to 38XX class, 3846.  I am still mulling over the ramifications of baseboard construction.
With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
Coventry Corporation Transport Society: www.cct-society.org.uk
Hessle: www.hessle.org.uk

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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #4221 on: May 22, 2020, 08:04:52 PM »
My current baseboards are from Model RaIway Solutions and are 9mm throughout.  However, 9mm is too thin for track pins without cutting the ends off the pins.  Also, I thought that 12mm would make the whole thing a little stiffer.  I am current;y investigating buying everything ready cut, although it is somewhat expensive.  However, it may be offset by not having to buy new machinery.
Hi  Laurence,

Iíve just used 9mm ply and have fastened my track with the SL-14 track pins, like you said I also cut the ends off. I used a 0.5mm drill bit in a pin vice to open up the Pin holes on the code 55 track but didnít drill into the ply.

What I did learn, is that I should have used a 0.7mm drill bit for the holes to make the placing of the pins in the holes a bit easier - the pin shank diameter is 0.7mm. I found that it was sometimes difficult to get the pin through the 0.5mm hole and on a coupe of occasions the pin went in on an angle and didnít Go in vertically - when this happened, I removed the pin and put it in a different sleeper.

The benefit of cutting the SL-14ís is that very few actually bent when I was hammering them in and they do get a good grip even though I trimmed off roughly a third.

Cheers Derek

Cheers Derek

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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #4222 on: May 22, 2020, 10:42:30 PM »
My current baseboards are from Model RaIway Solutions and are 9mm throughout.  However, 9mm is too thin for track pins without cutting the ends off the pins.  Also, I thought that 12mm would make the whole thing a little stiffer.  I am current;y investigating buying everything ready cut, although it is somewhat expensive.  However, it may be offset by not having to buy new machinery.
Hi  Laurence,

Iíve just used 9mm ply and have fastened my track with the SL-14 track pins, like you said I also cut the ends off. I used a 0.5mm drill bit in a pin vice to open up the Pin holes on the code 55 track but didnít drill into the ply.

What I did learn, is that I should have used a 0.7mm drill bit for the holes to make the placing of the pins in the holes a bit easier - the pin shank diameter is 0.7mm. I found that it was sometimes difficult to get the pin through the 0.5mm hole and on a coupe of occasions the pin went in on an angle and didnít Go in vertically - when this happened, I removed the pin and put it in a different sleeper.

The benefit of cutting the SL-14ís is that very few actually bent when I was hammering them in and they do get a good grip even though I trimmed off roughly a third.

Cheers Derek

When using 9mm ply I install the pins to full depth, then on the underside of the board I remove the excess length with a slitting disk.

You can always remove the pins after ballasting, if solid enough or glue the track down then remove the pins

Stay safe

Mike H  8)

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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #4223 on: Yesterday at 07:32:28 AM »
Thanks again everyone, for your advice.  Up until now, I have cut the track pins under the board using a fairly chunky pair of wire cutters that I used to use in my electonics days (a long time ago now).  Incidentally, I also use the same snips for snipping off the excess length of point motor operating rods.  With my present setup, I have to crawl under the boards to do it but, with any new layout, I will be able to simply up end the board.  However, I would rather not have to do it if I can help it.  I'm still rather taken with the idea of 12mm ply because of the extra stiffness and 1200mm by 600mm boards shouldn't be too heavy.  The cost difference between 9mm ply and 12mm ply is quite small.  I'll continue to mull on everything for a little longer.
With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
Coventry Corporation Transport Society: www.cct-society.org.uk
Hessle: www.hessle.org.uk

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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #4224 on: Yesterday at 07:11:57 PM »
Today was our day for walking into Hessle to pick up our order from the butchers.  After we returned, we had coffee and then I set about some garden tasks.  First I dug a hole in a large, dense patch of Lily-of-the-Valley where I wanted to transplant a corkscrew hazel that we had mis-planted.  That was followed, naturally, by digging up the hazel and replanting it.  I had to give the hole several litres of water because we still have had no rain.  We did get 1mm early yesterday morning, but that only brings the total for the month to 5.2mm.  Considering that we only had 4.2mm last month, I think we really do have desert conditions here.  We have had about 30mm in the last three months, which is about a quarter of what we would normally expect, even in this dry part of the country.  I will need to have a major watering session again tonight.

I did some other maintenance jobs, which took us up to dinnertime.  In the afternoon, I visited the Train Shed and checked that 64960 was still running sweetly, which it was so I turned my attention to 3846.  When I put it on the mainline, it was really rough, so I turned its top voltage up from 40 to 100.  It soon loosened up, but had a couple of episodes where it just stopped and refused to run.  In each case, I lifted it and checked.  When I put it back on the track it ran again.  On the second occasion I noticed that the tender appeared to be rather hot, which is where the motor is.  After that, I reduced its speed to normal and then it ran faultlessly.  Here it is passing Burnham Rocks.



I decided that, because the Union Mills locos had been playing up a bit lately, I would return 64960 and 3846 to their original Loco IDs and assign the backup IDs to the two Union Mills locos.  Weíll see how the two rejuvenated locos get on next time they run with their original trains.

Talking about rejuvenation, I have a Kensington Tracking Ball which I have used for several years because I find it much easier to use than a mouse because I donít have to keep chasing it around the desk. 



However, of late, the right mouse button has been playing up and, yesterday, it stopped working all together.  I was reluctant to order another immediately because they are quite expensive.  So I ordered an inexpensive wireless mouse to be going on with.  But, this afternoon, I thought I would have a go at repairing the tracking ball.  It has very tiny socket screws but, fortunately, I have a rather handy driver set that I bought two or three years ago so that I could work on my locos.



Here you can see the driver with four of the tiny screws.



There was a fifth screw, but it was hidden beneath a non-slip strip, and didnít come completely out of the base.  But I managed to get the top off.



Then I gave the body a dust and the switches a spray with good old-fashioned contact cleaner.



Itís the same can that I use to spray up the driver orifice of any loco that appears to have pickup problems.  It took a little while for the contact cleaner to work, but then I was able to re-assemble the tracking ball and, although the right mouse button is still a little dickie at times, it seems to have done the job.  I hope it will settle down like my locos do after similar treatment.
With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #4225 on: Yesterday at 09:23:25 PM »
Quote
I have a Kensington Tracking Ball which I have used for several years because I find it much easier to use than a mouse because I donít have to keep chasing it around the desk. 
I tried one of them,but spent more time chasing the ball around the floor  so ive resorted back to

never understood why they never became more popular. its the best thing microsoft have ever released
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 09:26:18 PM by themadhippy »

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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #4226 on: Today at 06:42:07 AM »
Quote
I have a Kensington Tracking Ball which I have used for several years because I find it much easier to use than a mouse because I donít have to keep chasing it around the desk. 
I tried one of them,but spent more time chasing the ball around the floor  so ive resorted back to

never understood why they never became more popular. its the best thing microsoft have ever released
Which isn't saying much, then. :D
With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
Coventry Corporation Transport Society: www.cct-society.org.uk
Hessle: www.hessle.org.uk

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: Marton Hinmarche
« Reply #4227 on: Today at 06:12:46 PM »
Today, we planned to go for a walk early and then visit the plant centre again to buy some more plants for Celiaís hanging baskets.  However, at 6.15, when I got to the washing machine, which we set for overnight to use cheap electricity, disaster struck.  The machine was indicating that it hadnít started, but obviously it had because the washing was stuck to the drum, caused by the action of the spin.  However, the door was locked and I couldnít get the washing out.  But worse was to follow.  After turning it off and then fiddling a bit with the settings, the door eventually unlocked and I was able to remove the washing, which was soaking wet.  However, I thought I would test the machine on the rinse cycle.  It worked OK until it got to the spin and then it just stopped.  When I pressed the touch pad to unlock the door, there was a bright blue flash and a loud bang.  It took out the mains and all the computers, etc died.  I managed to get the power back on again, but the washing machine was, obviously, well and truly dead.

Eventually we discovered that it was still under the two-year manufacturerís warranty and, after a lot of faffing about, I managed to book a repair engineer, although not until a week tomorrow.  So our plans were somewhat frustrated.  In the end, we went off to the plant centre because, by then, it was almost ten oíclock.  When we returned, we had coffee and then a late, but not very long walk before dinnertime.

In the afternoon, I barrowed compost and banked all the maincrop potatoes.  I did get down to the Train Shed in the end and ran the next operating cycle.  3846 emerged from Oakwood Tunnel with the coal train, just like it used to in the old days.



Then 9744 appeared with the branch passenger from Shipton, just like it used to before the arrival of the small prairies.



Here it is Ďat homeí at Platform 4, with 6417 standing over at Platform 2 with its ĎBí set.



Also, standing in the goods loop, waiting for the completion of goods loading and unloading, was J39, 64960, just like it used to.



So all three of the locos that were relegated for poor performance are now fully recommissioned again.  However, there was a strange occurrence right at the death.  9744 uncoupled beautifully from its train and made its way into the headshunt of the Norton run-around.  But I couldnít stop it.  It just wouldnít respond to the controller.  I picked it up and put it on the mainline, but it was still wanting to accelerate to full speed.  It seemed that it had forgotten its new loco ID, so I put it on the program track and tried to read its ID, but to no avail.  I tried to reprogram it back to Loco 17, which is what it should have been, but without any success.  I took 5572 and placed that on the program track, but I couldnít read its ID either.  In the end, I switched off the controller and then switched it back on again.  Then, 5572 indicated that its ID was 19, which is what it should have been.  So I checked 9744 and it then read the correct ID of 17.  So the controller must have gone doolally and needed rebooting.  After that, 9744 behaved properly again.

So, all in all, it was a bit of an unusual day.
With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
Coventry Corporation Transport Society: www.cct-society.org.uk
Hessle: www.hessle.org.uk

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Re: Marton Hinmarchem
« Reply #4228 on: Today at 06:34:09 PM »
Laurence

Not been a good couple of days for you with technology, first mouse trouble, then washing machine and finally a locomotive that tryís escaping.

Unfortunately we all take these gadgets for granted until the day they donít work.

Hope you soon get sorted, nothing worse that not having a washing machine for a few days.

Stay safe

Mike H  8)


 

 

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