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Author Topic: The Train Shed Project - Marton Hinmarche  (Read 159546 times)

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Offline bob lawrence

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1905 on: January 23, 2018, 03:25:51 PM »
Not kept fully up to date so donít know if this has already been suggested but any thoughts regarding soldering joins on a curve? Donít know what others think of this but this is what I do.

Offline 25901JFM

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1906 on: January 23, 2018, 04:53:19 PM »
Could the wide joints be down to the cooler weather?  When the railway shed warms up in the spring and summer these joints may well close up.  Its just a thought and I could be way off in my thinking...  I'm not sure what the properties of Peco Rail is like in respect of expansion & contraction in relation to temperature variations.
John

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1907 on: January 23, 2018, 06:43:49 PM »
Having learned the hard way, I now NEVER attach flexitrack directly to the arms of  points as I found it always seems to move. I now use very short pieces of setrack, even cuts up bits, and attach the flexi onto that.

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1908 on: January 23, 2018, 06:47:04 PM »
Having learned the hard way, I now NEVER attach flexitrack directly to the arms of  points as I found it always seems to move. I now use very short pieces of setrack, even cuts up bits, and attach the flexi onto that.

That is an excellent tip, Mike. I wish I had known that before. I will try it when I relay the Down line through Cant Cove station.

Online Innovationgame

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1909 on: January 23, 2018, 06:59:08 PM »
Having learned the hard way, I now NEVER attach flexitrack directly to the arms of  points as I found it always seems to move. I now use very short pieces of setrack, even cuts up bits, and attach the flexi onto that.
An excellent idea.  But will Set Track interface with code 55?
With kind regards
Laurence
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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1910 on: January 23, 2018, 07:01:34 PM »
Ah yes, different track heights......

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1911 on: January 23, 2018, 07:15:29 PM »
Ah yes, different track heights......

I also use Code 55, too, but on a cardboard strip base. The height distances can easily be accommodated with a cardboard strip which will be hidden by the ballast, later. (As mine is.)

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1912 on: January 23, 2018, 07:30:07 PM »
Perhaps I could remove the cork underlay from the Set Track sections.
With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
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Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1913 on: January 23, 2018, 07:52:28 PM »
Perhaps I could remove the cork underlay from the Set Track sections.

That might work, Laurence. I do have cork underlay under other sections, like under the goods yard and the fiddle yard.

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1914 on: January 23, 2018, 07:56:04 PM »
First thing this morning, I ran four timetable sub-cycles, including one with 6417 running the branch goods.  I have to say that, apart from 6417, which still has several stretches of track where it performs a momentary stall, everything else seems to work OK.  The temperature was a little higher this morning and 9744 was no problem at all.  I am persisting with some timetable running every day, where possible, to keep the locos Ďwarmí so to speak.

After the gym, I had some U3A chores to do and it wasnít until later this afternoon that I arrived back in the Train Shed.  I ran the last two sub-cycles of the second full cycle and only 6417 gave its usual coughs and splutters.  It seems to have fits at points and rail joints, but also at other locations as well.  9744 runs on the same track without any problem, although it did have a couple of derailment incidents, possible cause by bad re-railing in the hidden loops.  This is because I currently effect run-arounds by manually lifting the locos and putting them back on the track at the other end of the train.

After the running session, I addressed the stonework on the Gatsby Tunnel complex.  The 300 gsm card I had ordered arrived today.  Unfortunately, I had trouble getting the printer to accept it, but eventually I set the printer to Ď150 Ė 220 gsm cardí  and that seemed to do the trick.  The main problem was that it took about five minutes for the Scalescenes PDF file to be processed by my computer and the printer software, so it took a long time to find a workable solution.  I have used the Scalescenes Random Rubble file to print the stonework for the wall adjacent to the branch.  I cut the card to size and tried sticking it with dilute PVA, but I had to resort to neat PVA to get it to stick properly.  I used a watercolour brush to spread the PVA to prevent any lumps appearing.



I donít think the final result looks too bad, although I will need to overhang some vegetation around the tops of the walls to hide the joins.

With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
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Offline jpendle

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1915 on: January 23, 2018, 10:43:18 PM »
FYI there is 'Settrack' available in code 55.

Also I use Code 55 Flex and do not have any issues with it moving. I pin the track using the pilot holes drilled out from the bottom. Once ballasted and glued then the track won't move. Biggest issue is cutting the ends to length when curving the track. I start by very roughly bending the track to the shape of the curve, I then trim the ends to make them parallel. Then I fix the track in place with rail joiners and pins. I check the joins and if necessary lift the track and trim it again.

I'm lucky in that I'm not doing any sharp curves on my layout, so I use a SCARM track plan, printed out full size, and lay the track on top of that. Once track laying is done, I cut away the track diagram.

Regards,

John P

Offline Ian Bowden

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1916 on: January 24, 2018, 09:31:44 AM »
Iím not sure whether I would be able to construct all the concentric loops satisfactorily and I would need to find out about adapting the points to DCC.

The points wouldn't be a problem as you just swap the normal joiners for insulated ones on the Y arms.
HOWEVER Kato points are much bigger than Peco ones, and when you join two up the distance between the tracks is greater than with Peco i.e the two lines are further apart.
The Kato curves use larger radii too, so would take up much more space.
It isn't practical to use Kato for exactly the same track plan/board size as with Peco.
Doing straights with Kato and everything else with Peco isn't practical either as you would have to use loads of special pieces of adaptor track.

Had I known about Kato when I started Wookery I would have used it, and I too have considered changing over from Peco recently after some "issues" but it just couldn't be done. I lifted track and sorted out the problems instead. By and large it all runs okay now.
You don't need any adaptor track to connect peco to Kato the adaptor track available is for tomix to kato. All you need is to use normal track joiners and support the peco track with some shims - cork tiles are about the right thickness

Offline Black Sheep

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1917 on: January 24, 2018, 10:25:05 AM »

After the running session, I addressed the stonework on the Gatsby Tunnel complex.  The 300 gsm card I had ordered arrived today.  Unfortunately, I had trouble getting the printer to accept it, but eventually I set the printer to Ď150 Ė 220 gsm cardí  and that seemed to do the trick.  The main problem was that it took about five minutes for the Scalescenes PDF file to be processed by my computer and the printer software, so it took a long time to find a workable solution.  I have used the Scalescenes Random Rubble file to print the stonework for the wall adjacent to the branch.  I cut the card to size and tried sticking it with dilute PVA, but I had to resort to neat PVA to get it to stick properly.  I used a watercolour brush to spread the PVA to prevent any lumps appearing.



I donít think the final result looks too bad, although I will need to overhang some vegetation around the tops of the walls to hide the joins.


I hear good things about UHU, the none-smelly version apparently is less stringy according to metcalfe.

would a couple of buttresses along the wall help hide the joins and give a bit of visual interest to the structure?

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1918 on: January 24, 2018, 02:44:16 PM »
Yes, a buttress or two might be a useful addition.  Thank you.
With kind regards
Laurence
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Offline keithbythe sea

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1919 on: January 24, 2018, 05:17:01 PM »
Looking good Laurence.

I agree with the buttress suggestion, and some coping along the left wall (similar to that on the wall on the extreme right of the photo) would add a good finishing touch.

 

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