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Author Topic: Rail Joiners  (Read 3697 times)

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Offline rg1

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Rail Joiners
« on: December 31, 2011, 05:39:52 PM »
This may sound like a stupid question but do I need specific type/size fishplates for Peco code 55 track or will normal ones (SL-310) do?

Thanks
Rob
The pen is mightier than the sword (and easier to write with!)

Offline Donkey

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Re: Rail Joiners
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2011, 07:06:56 PM »
Hi Rob, normal Peco  :NGAUGE: fishplates are correct for code 55. Feel free to ask any questions on here as the members are a great bunch and very helpful.  ;D

 :NGaugersRule:

Donkey

Offline rg1

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Re: Rail Joiners
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2011, 07:17:19 PM »
Thought as much but better to be safe than sorry.

Thanks & A happy New Year to you :beers:
The pen is mightier than the sword (and easier to write with!)

Offline poliss

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Re: Rail Joiners
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2011, 07:25:30 PM »
Yep, it says on the packet, suitable for both code 80 and 55.
Useless for Atlas code 55 though.

Offline rg1

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Re: Rail Joiners
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2011, 07:49:52 PM »
Yep, it says on the packet, suitable for both code 80 and 55.
Useless for Atlas code 55 though.

I ordered 30yds of 55 flexi which arrived today so just wanted to make sure about the fishplates before ordering any.
The pen is mightier than the sword (and easier to write with!)

Offline Donkey

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Re: Rail Joiners
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2011, 07:58:46 PM »
Happy New Year to you too  :beers:. Sounds like you are going to have a busy one with all of that track lol. :)

Offline Kudi

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Re: Rail Joiners
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2012, 10:44:54 AM »
I have just started using Peco code 55, and I was surprised to see that the Peco joiners (both plastic and metal) appear to be easier to slide onto code 55 than onto code 80. Anybody else notice this?
BR 1950s freelance

Offline edwin_m

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Re: Rail Joiners
« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2012, 11:41:03 AM »
I've not noticed much difference, but possibly something to do with the rail needing filing underneath and above its foot before attaching the joiner, to remove any "burr" from left over when it was cut.  I have found this even on pre-cut rails from Peco (points and end of flexitrack lengths) and depending on how you do it, it is probably worse for stuff you cut yourself. 

Offline Kudi

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Re: Rail Joiners
« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2012, 11:50:57 AM »
Edwin:

There is a fine groove between the "real" bottom of the rail and the "visible" bottom. I have found - particularly with code 55 turnouts - that there is often excess plastic in that groove, which prevents you from sliding the joiners into the correct position. The tip of a modeler's knife is usually pointy enough to pick out the plastic residue and fold it back to the nearest sleeper, where you can cut it off.
BR 1950s freelance

Offline AndyGif

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Re: Rail Joiners
« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2012, 11:51:03 AM »
Now comes the thorny issue of do you solder the joints as well?

Some would advocate yes if your happy with the track as layed, as they are  just a push fit they might not maintain good contacted over time.

Personally, I only solder the ones where i put the feed wires on.
if i suspect a loose one i might just give it a gently squeeze on to the rail with either tips of my xuron track cutter or small pair of side cutters. but thats just me.....


Offline Kudi

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Re: Rail Joiners
« Reply #10 on: July 20, 2012, 12:01:44 PM »
Good one, Andy!

I always solder joints between flex track and turnouts/crossing, but not between two turnouts or crossings. However, I feed power to every turnout/crossing separately.
BR 1950s freelance

Offline edwin_m

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Re: Rail Joiners
« Reply #11 on: July 20, 2012, 12:27:23 PM »
I solder each rail to a brass screw at the end of each baseboard, but other joints are unsoldered and at least one per board has a bit of slack to allow for expansion of the rails (which someone suggested is actually the board changing size, but it comes to the same thing!).  In hidden areas I remove the last few sleepers at each join and here I solder the joiner to one rail only, so it can't work itself along the rail.  However I also solder a separate dropper wire to each separate rail so the joiners aren't needed to conduct power. 

Offline edwin_m

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Re: Rail Joiners
« Reply #12 on: July 20, 2012, 12:29:15 PM »
There is a fine groove between the "real" bottom of the rail and the "visible" bottom. I have found - particularly with code 55 turnouts - that there is often excess plastic in that groove, which prevents you from sliding the joiners into the correct position. The tip of a modeler's knife is usually pointy enough to pick out the plastic residue and fold it back to the nearest sleeper, where you can cut it off.

I haven't looked at it closely enough to see whether it is metal or plastic but this is one of the areas I give a touch with the file to help the joiners go on smoothly. 

 

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