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Author Topic: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)  (Read 56380 times)

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Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #150 on: July 17, 2016, 09:22:20 PM »
One day one of my layout building sessions will go to plan, but not yet.  The intention for this weekend as mentioned above was to build up the baseboard to around trackbed level with cork sheet, blend in the edges, fill the gaps and do a very small amount of landscaping with DAS modelling clay, then start ballasting.  I got as far as sticking down some cork sheets, then found that my DAS clay has turned into a small housebrick. So that was that.

The cork sheet is actually about 1mm higher than the trackbed with bothered me until I looked at some photos and realised that the track on these funny little Borders branches is not so much raised above the ground as sunk into it.  I don't know whether they were built like that or whether the lightly constructed trackbed just subsided over the years, but a 1mm step between trackbed and the land either side of it looks as though it should be about right.

Meanwhile, thanks to the enormous kindness of @richard9002 for sending me the Scotsgap drawings, I now have yet another half-completed card building to add to the collection.  I changed a few things, working from photos of the slightly smaller stations at Meldon and Angerton.  Construction is as for the signalbox, with spare windows and doors left over from various Metcalfe kits.  It sits a lot squarer than my previous attempt at building a station, although as I type this I have just noticed a really annoying gap where the waiting room attaches to the station house.  It will have a drainpipe there whether the prototype did or not.

To my surprise I have realised I do not have many more buildings to construct, just the low relief terraces which are a straight kitbuild, and a small weighbridge office.  All my buildings still need plenty of work but at least I can now play about with positioning and look at starting work on the station platform, which I could not do until I had the outline of the station building.


Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #151 on: July 17, 2016, 10:46:17 PM »
That's good news, indeed. The buildings are coming along very well.

Offline cornish yorkie

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #152 on: July 17, 2016, 11:31:52 PM »
 :hellosign: excellent modelling, looking really nice, thanks for the updates
regards Derek.

Offline richard9002

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #153 on: July 20, 2016, 02:16:26 PM »
Just happy to help another N Gauger! Good to see the buildings developing. Look forward to seeing the finished article eventually  :thumbsup:
Any opinion expressed above is mine and mine alone. Unless you happen to agree. Then they're your's too.

Offline Tractor37

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #154 on: July 20, 2016, 09:07:11 PM »
Hi there.
Just read through your thread and have to say there is some nice modelling going on here squire.
Shall be checking back regularly with this one.
Keep up the good work.
Jas...  :beers:

Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #155 on: July 21, 2016, 10:07:06 PM »
Redutex - hmm.  I ordered a sheet of "uneven" slate roofing as it was the only kind in stock.  I have used it for the roof of the pub but there are a few problems.  Firstly that the slates are not in a straight line.  I know it says uneven on the packet: but slate is a pretty durable material and tends to stay straight, apart from individual slates dropping out of position when the fixing nails rust through. It doesn't go wonky. Secondly, the horizontal lines are a lot more pronounced than the vertical ones, so from normal viewing distance the building looks as though it has been roofed with overlapping wooden planks. On the positive side it is nice and easy to use, just make the roof from card, cut the Redutex to shape, peel off the backing paper and stick it on.  I managed to get one of the roof panels on upside down and was able to peel it off and restick it.  I'll use it for the station building, but probably go back to the Ratio sheets for the terraced houses and shop, so that they all look the same.  In my imaginary Longframlington, the terraces and shop would all have been built around the time the railway was constructed: the pub was a converted house that was there a long time before the railway.

Visible in the background are the cork sheets I have used to build up the land either side of the railway, blended in to the trackbed with DAS clay.  Ballasting next...




Offline kirky

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #156 on: July 22, 2016, 07:06:13 AM »
Hi Richard
I see what you mean by the pronounced horizontal lines. I had to zoom right in to see the vertical line. That's a shame. I wonder if that is why slaters don't overlap their tile sheet, to avoid that horizontal line? I didn't really notice the wonkiness though.

All in all, it looks really good.

Cheers
Kirky
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Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #157 on: July 22, 2016, 11:04:10 AM »
I like the idea of using cork sheeting to build up the ground to sleeper height before ballasting. I think I will try something similar to build up the trackbed to just below normal sleeper height before ballasting.

Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #158 on: July 24, 2016, 06:35:27 PM »
A useful weekend's work for once.  I had to stay in all day Saturday waiting for a telephone call, so I thought Imight as well do something useful. First job was to start ballasting the pointwork at the station throat: I then had to wait for the glue to dry throughly before I could start cleaning it up, so I got on with other more interesting stuff.

I thought it was about time I had a station platform, constructed from a mixture of 1/16 and 1/8 inch balsa in my usual fashion.  I will use Metcalfe card for the stone facings, and play about with various materials to get the correct fine gravel effect for the top.  The North British Railway was much too tight-fisted to spend money on anything fancy like paving slabs.  I also decided to move the cattle dock to the end of the long goods siding as there wasn't really enough space where I had originally planned it.I could do with the entire trackplan being shifted about an inch towards the front of the layout but it's a bit late for that now. With the platforms done I was able to build up the ground on the station board using cork sheet as for the other board.



Then some more buildings.  I knocked up the two Metcalfe kits for the low relief terraces - a bit annoyed to find all the doors different colours, and no plain unpainted ones included in the kit. I don't really like those arched doorways either, much too posh for an old pit village, so further surgery may be needed. I decided to use the Redutex for the roofs seeing as I have paid for it.  I also finished off the corner shop (including roof) so I have some idea now of what my street scene will look like.  Next step is to cut back the pavements in front of the buildings which are more Regent Street than small Northumbrian village, then lay down some kerbstones and build up the road surface between them. The buildings seem to disguise the end of the scenic section quite nicely.



I still have quite a lot of ballasting to do, but once that is finished and I have the layout running properly again (ha ha) I will need to start looking at some profiled plywood sheets around the edges of the layout, and then a backscene board behind that.  The "country" end will feature a garden by the station house, and probably a couple of large trees to hide the corner. The centre section (between the platform and houses) looks a bit bare and I haven't yet decided on scenic treatment for this bit - nothing fancy as there isn't a lot of space to play with.

Starting to feel quite pleased with this little layout now it is looking more railway-like, but it doesn't yet have that Northumbrian feel to it.  Stone walls and distant moorland should make a difference.





Offline kirky

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #159 on: July 24, 2016, 07:47:56 PM »
Nice work Richad, thanks for sharing.

Kirky
Northallerton will make its next public appearance at the LINCOLN MODEL RAILWAY CLUB ANNUAL EXHIBITION Feb 29th -1st Mar 2020



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Offline Roy L S

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #160 on: July 24, 2016, 07:57:16 PM »
Excellent work.

I have a feeling that we will be watching a truly excellent layout develop over forthcoming weeks and months, I shall return to this thread with great interest.

Roy

Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #161 on: July 24, 2016, 08:12:52 PM »
Sitting here looking at those low relief terraces and the more I look at them the less I like them.  The "stone" walls are totally different to the other houses and shop, which admittedly look more like weathered brick than stone. Two choices I think - either try to "wrap" them with stone effect building paper (filling in those arches at the same time) or start again, this time using the Metcalfe fronts and sides as a template to make new ones in card. I might go for the latter as the roofs are fractionally short as well. Not one of Metcalfe's better efforts IMHO.

Online port perran

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #162 on: July 24, 2016, 08:23:47 PM »
I think they look OK and I don't think you should worry too much.. However, my comment with too many Metcalfe buildings is that a layout starts to look a bit samey ie all the buildings look rather similar whereas in real life , that is often not the case.
A bit of variety would give a more individual feel to the layout.
Having said that however, this looks like a really excellent start.
Keep the pictures coming.
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline kirky

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #163 on: July 24, 2016, 08:42:27 PM »
I know I would feel the same Richard. Once a niggle catches your eye, you can't ever get used to it until you change it.
I've done that several times on Northallerton. Having sad that, there are many many botches that I let go.
It's your layout Richard, do what you like.

Cheers
Kirky
Northallerton will make its next public appearance at the LINCOLN MODEL RAILWAY CLUB ANNUAL EXHIBITION Feb 29th -1st Mar 2020



Layout: Northallerton: http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=1671.msg16930#msg16930

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Cleveland Model Railway club website: www.clevelandmrc.club

Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #164 on: July 24, 2016, 08:46:32 PM »
I think they look OK and I don't think you should worry too much.. However, my comment with too many Metcalfe buildings is that a layout starts to look a bit samey ie all the buildings look rather similar whereas in real life , that is often not the case.
A bit of variety would give a more individual feel to the layout.
Having said that however, this looks like a really excellent start.
Keep the pictures coming.

I know what you mean, but in this case this little block of buildings (apart from the pub) would all have been built around the same time, probably by the same builders to house railway staff. It's amazing how many people even a small branch line would have employed in the Victorian era. So I actually want them to look that way, hence my annoyance at multi-coloured front doors. If I was modelling modern era each house would be different, bay windows, double glazing, fake stone cladding, loft extensions, you name it. But back in the early sixties things were a bit less varied, judging from old photos (I'm not quite old enough to remember :) )

 

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